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Comment: Re:Its in the best interest of users (Score 3, Informative) 130

by NevDull (#37833626) Attached to: Concerns Over Google Modifying SSL Behavior

First of all, any well-architected clustered app spends more time waiting for I/O at the web tier than it uses CPU, so the 2% "penalty" is on an underutilized resource anyway. Second, terminating SSL at your load balancers is standard practice, be they Amazon ELB SSL termination, F5 BigIPs, or reverse proxies. Again, all otherwise I/O-bound implementations which can spare the CPU.

The fact that SSL obscures the requested URI from intermediaries seems in-line with the goals of Wikipedia for free information sharing -- with SSL operating properly, an intermediary may be able to tell that you were on Wikipedia, but not what you were looking at.

SSL/TLS and/or its successors everywhere is in everyone's interest if maintaining privacy from ubiquitous snooping is a concern.

Comment: Re:Is it Twelvember yet? (Score 1, Insightful) 341

by NevDull (#35479158) Attached to: Happy Pi Day

It's simple to say that it's a matter of being difficult, but for most purposes of person-to-person communication, isn't the month often more relevant than the day of month when conveying information?

"Which year?" is solved for most purposes by assuming the current year and getting a sense of tense for correction.

"Which month?" gives me an idea of the sense of urgency for paying attention to your story. If something's happening this month or next, or happened last month, it's likely more significant than if you start out telling me December when the current month is March.

"Which day?" without the month ends up making one scramble for context.

While YYYY-MM-DD makes sense for those of us who get the importance of sorting, for people, "March 14, 2011" conveys information in what I think to be descending order of importance for people, and to then transcribe it as 3/14/2011 isn't so damn evil...

Comment: Re:just wondering (Score 2, Insightful) 151

by NevDull (#34300106) Attached to: Sculptor Gives a Hint For CIA's Kryptos

This is the same reason Lost appealed to the masses, but not the thinking folk -- if you can throw arbitrary impossible bullshit in to "explain" something, it's not really an explanation. It became more like a bunch of kids playing Cops and Robbers with the one kid who decides he's got an alien spacecraft with a freeze ray that he can use at any point to immobilize his enemies. Call it a black swan if you want, but it certainly affects how interesting a story is.

Comment: Re:Not all bad points (Score 1) 864

by NevDull (#33952690) Attached to: Steve Jobs Lashes Out At Android

Multiple markets being available doesn't mean that multiple markets will survive.

Apple's free to open an Android App Market, with Apple-reviewed apps, and taking a cut for the value they add.
Ultimately, it could become the most popular Android App Market, and a de facto monopoly instead of a de jure one.

That's what open is really about.

Android provides an ecosystem. iDevice provides a homogeneous, crafted population. One evolves by natural selection, the other is a product of intelligent design. Unlike the Flying Spaghetti Monster, Steve will die some day. Then what happens? Android may take longer to "get it right", but just like with biological evolution, rapid uncontrolled iteration will ultimately lead to the fittest solutions.

Motorola, HTC, and Samsung are upping each others' game by competing based upon the value they add with their handset and OS customizations. Sure, right now they're bending over more for the carrier than the end-user, but all it'll take is one viable and open service provider to blow that open.

Comment: What does this say about secrets? (Score 1) 185

by NevDull (#33174810) Attached to: Saudi Says RIM Deal Reached; BlackBerry OK, If We Can Read the Messages

All of this hubbub comes around the time of the big Wikileaks document release.

What does it say about us that not only do our governments want to keep secrets "safe" from us, but that for us to be able to keep secrets is dangerous.

The only difference is that they presume themselves innocent, and presume us guilty.

Comment: Re:a better question (Score 1) 706

by NevDull (#31864942) Attached to: Should Kids Be Bribed To Do Well In School?

I was responding to the way that you rephrased the OP, and inquiring because parents who use the term "the best way to raise my children" usually hide behind their ignorance.

The last line wasn't a content-free one-liner. Your response shows that you've thought it out. You know the goal, and aren't hiding behind "I know best how to raise my children". It's only meaningless for you because you've really thought through the goals.

The number of computer scientists in a room is inversely proportional to the number of bugs in their code.

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