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Comment: Re:I love you man (Score 1) 305

by Nemesisghost (#49033529) Attached to: Alcohol's Evaporating Health Benefits
As a non-drinking Mormon I can say that the population I belong to is as a whole more healthy than the rest of the population. At one point we had a 10-20% longer life span. We generally have a much lower level of the most common health issues. But you are talking about a highly socializing & very health conscious group of people who abstain from drugs, alcohol, tobacco, tea & coffee.

Comment: Re:Yes. (Score 1) 673

by Nemesisghost (#48885157) Attached to: Should Disney Require Its Employees To Be Vaccinated?
Unless what you do on your off time affects how well you do your job. Think about a drunk who comes to work hung over. If that person is in anyway responsible for other people's safety, then they should be checked to make sure they are 100% capable of performing their job. Are you willing to risk your life & the life of your loved ones by getting on the bus when its driver is clearly hung over?
If the company you work for relies on it's public perception, then yeah, an person who identifies themselves as an employee should be fired or disciplined when they bad mouth their employer. I mean, do you think Samsung was happen when celebrities endorsed their products from an iPhone? And when that occurred, what do you think happened to either the iPhone or the endorsement contracts?
If what you do has absolutely no bearing on how well you do your job or affects your company in any way, then sure it's none of your employer's business. I don't think my employer cares about Lego or video game hobbies.

Comment: Re:password manager (Score 1) 191

by Nemesisghost (#47992129) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: How To Keep Students' Passwords Secure?
I've not heard of Lastpass. But when I was looking for a password generator I found KeePass & use that. I then have a cloud drive I keep the DB stored on & install the app on w/e device I need/want to access the accounts stored within on. And while I've not done this myself, I have see KeePass auto enter Username/Password into a website. I just copy/paste them manually, and the apps erase the clipboard after 30sec for the more security conscience.
Using a password manager of any sort allows you to have long random passwords and not have to actually remember any of them, unless you secure access to them with another password. Considering the issues that have been highlighted where having multiple significant accounts tied to the same username & password, I would highly recommend everybody use some sort of a password manager besides a web browser password storage.

Comment: Re:Why? (Score 1) 120

by Nemesisghost (#47766563) Attached to: Predictive Modeling To Increase Responsivity of Streamed Games
Actually, the scenario I was describing is one that would benefit most multiplayer games, even locally rendered ones. With multiplayer games you aren't just rendering 1 scene & responding to the inputs from the one viewing the scene, but several players' inputs all at once, then have to make sure that the scene for all those players are correct. You can see the problems lag introduces when you do a large portion of the calculations on the server(as to prevent or deter cheating) in games like FFXIV(Google "FFXIV Titan Extreme Lag Issue" to see what I mean). Even when nobody has crippling lag issues, it's still evident when you see your entire party burst move at the last second to avoid a killing blow, when you know that they would have moved at the same time & speed you did. And this is a game where not only is the scene rendered locally, but all the primitives are available from local sources as well.
Using these predictive algorithms for player input & scene construction, would allow you to ship several scenes to each player, showing not only their immediate actions but the predicted actions of the other players. By predicting the actions of each player, the server could then more correctly account for those actions even when lag issues might have prevented the player from reacting the mob's attack quickly enough. As it stands right now, due to lag you might not even see the attack happen, even if it has a long cast/charge time, before you are hit with it.

Comment: Re:Why? (Score 1) 120

by Nemesisghost (#47755949) Attached to: Predictive Modeling To Increase Responsivity of Streamed Games
Where I see this as highly beneficial is WebGL based games. You can construct most of each scene on the server, ship it to the browser & have the browser do the final rendering. But to do the scene construction, you'll need to know each player's actions. If you can predict this, then you can ship several different based on your predictive algorithms, then have the browser render the one that closest matches what was actually done. Since DeLorean includes a corrective depth & rotation matrix, you can avoid some of issues with mis-predictions.
I kinda want to see how they implement it so that I could play with it. Plus, I wonder if it could be applied to other branching activities.

Comment: Corporate Culture (Score 5, Interesting) 368

by Nemesisghost (#47655323) Attached to: Comcast Drops Spurious Fees When Customer Reveals Recording
While I haven't worked for a large number of companies(only 4), I can say that corporate culture defines these types of interactions more than any executive degree ever will. When you have a company that is solely focused on profits, you will always end up with situations like this. Yet, when you have a company that values their customers, things like this will very rarely happen. The last company & the one I currently work for are both for profit(one public & one private), but put their customers first over that profit. This happens from the CEO down to those who are the face of the company people by interacting with the "customers". The attitude of service to the customer is ingrained as a part of the culture, and any deviation from this is unacceptable.

Contrast that with the companies I worked early on(a telemarketer & a "small loan" company) and it's night & day. These 2 companies only wanted profit, at the cost of mistreatment of their customers & employees. The attitude was to treat everybody suspiciously, and employment metrics were based on how much money you made the company. I now find it funny to see the excuses they used to justify the "good" work they were engaged in.

This is why people like to shop at mom & pop stores, which usually cost more, than Wal-Mart. The owners of these small shops care more about their customers & making sure that they leave a good impression, than they do the immediate sale. Now this might not be for truly altruistic purposes, as mom & pop shops live and die by word of mouth, but that doesn't mean it isn't appreciated.

Comment: Re:Mexico Vaccinates Better Than The US (Score 4, Interesting) 387

by Nemesisghost (#47241195) Attached to: California Whooping Cough Cases "an Epidemic"

of the 621 people known to have come down with whooping cough in San Diego county, the vast majority (85 percent) were up to date on their immunizations.

Here's the problem with that statistic: If 90% of the people in San Diego county are up to date on their vaccinations, and the per capita of individuals was equal, then you'd end up with about 63 of the 621(or 90%) of whooping cough individuals as having their vaccinations. To truly see how well the whooping cough vaccination is working, you need to compare it to the percentage of total vaccinations. If the % is higher than the vaccinations total, you've got a problem, otherwise we can continue to blame un-vaccinated individuals as the problem.

Comment: Re:If you regulate properly, we'll stop our busine (Score 1) 286

In addition to what spire3661 said, I've not increased the amount of water I'm using because there aren't new ways to use it as there were when the pipes were installed. Even if I added a hot tub or a pool, that would only significantly increase my water usage 1x, then it would go back to levels near what I was at before.

The same cannot be said about our internet usage. New applications have continuously come out that have increased our appetite for data. When I 1st got on the internet, 56k dial up was more than adequate for anything available. Later when I started college, 1.5Mbps was far faster than anything available at the time, and so provided speeds that were generally unnecessary for all but pirating movies. Now, anything less than about 15Mbps won't cut it. And to get that, even in a large city, you are going to pay almost $100/month.

Comment: Re:Who would have guessed? (Score 0) 217

Source or your're a shill.

I'll take you up on that. How's a simple Google search as a citation? The ads are all for "organic pesticides". Followed by several articles & websites either offering advice in what can be used(one of which is to use tobacco water, which generally has the same effect as how this pesticide is used) or explaining how these methods are just as bad or worse than regular pesticides.

The thing I learned by going over several of the articles turned up by this search is that the difference between an "organic" farm & a non-organic one isn't that there are no pesticides or that they aren't a factory farm, but that they only use naturally occurring and often unregulated pesticides, frequently at much higher application levels. Even worse, is that some of the pesticides & pesticide methods have much the same effect as synthetic ones, mainly because the base compounds are related(like using tobacco water versus neonicotinoids, as both are based on nicotine-like chemicals). What I see is no different than homeopathic remedies vs traditional medicine.

Comment: Re:Lock-in? (Score 3, Insightful) 589

But that's just it. For an organization to have to report that something is broken means it's not worth the cost, even if that cost is free. In addition, bug reporting is fine when you are a technical person. But think about those who actually make the decisions, they usually aren't technical and will be unwilling to report that something is broken beyond the guy who convinced them to use a broken product. And that phone call/meeting will end up with the decision maker demanding that they spend the money so at least he can have something that works, if not the entire organization.

Most public domain software is free, at least at first glance.

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