Slashdot is powered by your submissions, so send in your scoop

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment Re:Tell me... (Score 4, Informative) 172 172

Given that the new terms are voluntary and limited to just KU, this will likely be fine for everyone. What the above summary missed was that the new payment terms only apply to the books authors put into Kindle unlimited, and not to the entire Kindle Store. http://the-digital-reader.com/... Amazon made the change to encourage authors to submit longer works to KU. The old terms were based on per ebook read, not page. That favored short works over longer works.

Submission + - How to set up a Pirate eBook Store in Google Play Books->

Nate the greatest writes: Most ebook pirates simply upload ebooks to a one of many pirate sites, but the entrepreneurial ones have opened storefronts in Google Play Books. They invent an author's name, and then upload dozens if not hundreds of pirated ebooks under that name, The names can range from Devad Akbak to Ispanyolca, but the really clever pirates choose a legit sounding name like Bestsellers — Books USA Press or Fort Press and then start selling ebooks.

Thanks to Google's indifference, the pirates can continue to sell ebooks no matter how many times copyright holders might complain. If Google takes a pirated ebook down in response to a DMCA notice, the pirates simply upload another copy of the same title.

Link to Original Source

Submission + - Amazon's Manhattan Retail Store is Actually an Office, Not a Store->

Nate the greatest writes: It looks like all that talk last month of Amazon opening a brick and mortar store in New York City may be coming to naught. A new report reveals that Amazon is renting 470,000 sq. ft of office space in Manhattan at 7 West 34th St. That's a huge amount of space which will take up the entirety of the 12-story building. That's far more space than Amazon would need for a store (it's 3 times the size of a Walmart store), so it looks like those rumors about Amazon opening a brick and mortar store are still rumors.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - Amazon Wants to Crowd Source Your Next Kindle eBook->

Nate the greatest writes: Can a crowd of booklovers collectively pick a book which is worth reading? Amazon wants to find out. The retailer is about to launch a new program which will have indie authors submit their new unpublished work for readers to rate and discuss. The best books will be picked up by Amazon under a publishing contract with strangely limited terms: Amazon is asking for digital and audio rights, but not paper.

The program is so new that it doesn't even have a name, but it is already drawing the attention of some indie authors, including one that said she would be "all over it with a stand-alone just to generate more name exposure, which could lead to sales of my other books."

Link to Original Source

Submission + - Consumers Aren't Paying for Online Content->

Nate the greatest writes: If you only download free apps, you're not alone. A new survey from the UK shows that, with the majority of internet users get their content for free rather than paying for it. A third of the 1,000 respondents in the survey reported downloading free apps, while only 8% had bought apps. Over a quarter are streaming video online, but only 9% are buying said apps.And 24% were streaming music while only 4% paid for the service.

All in all this does not look good for anyone trying to sell content online, but there are a couple exceptions. The pollsters found that people were buying ebooks and music in greater numbers than those paying for streaming services.That suggests that consumers have transferred their buying habits fro books and CDs to ebooks and MP3s , and that makes sense. The streaming services are like broadcast TV and radio, which a lot of consumers are used to getting for free (BBC fees notwithstanding), while consumers are used to buying books and CDs.

Link to Original Source

Submission + - Japanese Publishers Lash Out at Amazon's Policies->

Nate the greatest writes: Amazon is in a bitter contract fight Hachette in the US and Bonnier in Germany, and now it seems the retail giant is also in conflict with publishers in the land of the rising sun. Amazon has launched a new rating system in Japan which gives publishers with larger ebook catalogs (and publishers that pay higher fees) preference, leading some to complain that Amazon is using its market power to blackmail publishers. Where have we heard that complaint before?

The retailer is also being boycotted by a handful of Japanese publishers which disagree with Amazon offering a rewards program to students. The retailer gives students 10 percent of a book's price as points which can be used to buy more books. This skirts Japanese fixed price book laws, and so several smaller publishers pulled their books from Amazon in protest in May.

I know that businesses are out to make money and not friends, but Amazon sure is a lightning rod for conflicts, isn't it?

Link to Original Source

Submission + - Would you buy a waterproof eReader or Tablet?->

Nate the greatest writes: Following only a couple months after a TechCrunch review of a waterproof Kindle Paperwhite, new leaks have revealed that Kobo is working on a waterproof ereader. The new Kobo Aura H2O is expected to go up for pre-order at the beginning of next month for $179, and while that's a high price it's not bad when you consider what you get with it.The Aura H2O will come certified to meet the IP67 standard, meaning that it will be dustproof and able to withstand being dunked in a meter of water for up to 30 minutes. The leaked specs tell us that it will have a larger screen than that waterproof Kindle — a 6.8" display, in fact. That's going to make the Aura H2O the best as well as one of the biggest ereaders on the market.

Would you buy one? I wouldn't. I don't have a problem with my electronics getting wet so i don't see a need to pay extra, and even if I did I wouldn't want a device which was tied to Kobo. If I were going to get a waterproof gadget it would probably be a tablet like the Xperia Z2 tablet from Sony. I might also pay for Waterfi to waterpoof a tablet as an aftermarket mod, but as I see it an ereader just isn't worth it.

Link to Original Source

Submission + - Do readers absorb less on Kindles than on paper? Not necessarily

An anonymous reader writes: eBooks are great and wonderful, but as The Guardian reports they might not be as good for readers paper books. Results from a new study shows that test subjects who read a story on a Kindle had trouble recalling the right order of the plot points. Out of 50 test subjects,half read a 28-page story on the Kindle, while half read the same story on paper. The Kindle group scored about the same on comprehension as the control group, but when they were asked to put the plot points in the proper order the Kindle group was about twice as likely to put them in the wrong order.

So is this bad news for ebooks? Have we reached the limits of their usefulness? Not necessarily.

While there is evidence that enhanced ebooks don't enhance education, an older study from 2012 has shown that students who study with an e-textbook on an ebook reader actually scored as well or higher on tests than a control group who did not. While that doesn't prove the newer study wrong, it does suggest that further study is required.

Comment Re:I'm not sure these buttons belong to the Wash P (Score 1) 136 136

I don't think it's co-owned. Read the article I linked to. Also, I can't find any other affiliate links to Amazon, so there is no evidence to support the idea that "whenever a title is mentioned, link to the appropriate Amazon page". If that were the case then song titles would also link there.

Line Printer paper is strongest at the perforations.

Working...