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Submission + - The pathologies of social media .. (

nickweller writes: 'The narcissism of the rhetoric of empowerment, lifestyle choices, and freedom thinly masks the deeper feelings of inadequacy, guilt, and irrelevancy. Social media is a mirror of all this, a non-place for non-people arguing in exaggerated emotional hysteria about often important issues, but whose arguing is driven by psychological deformation'.

Submission + - SPAM: Buskers\' Rights: Know the Laws of Street Performing

alanwest775 writes: A recently circulated video of Andrew Kalleen being arrested for busking in the New York City subway system has caused a lot of concern in the music/busking community.

You can watch the video here.

Andrew was armed with the correct citation showing the MTAâ(TM)s rules that permitted him to play; however, despite his repeated attempts to get the arresting officer to understand the law, the officer arrested Kalleen.

There\'s a lot of ignorance out there, folksâ"a lot of people who want to tell you âoeYOU CANT DO THAT!â when, in fact, you can.

This video is proof that you can be armed with the right information, be completely on the side of the law and still be denied your right to play. It\'s best to be fully informed, and then, wherever you are, carry a copy of the relevant law with you.

Busking, also known as street performaning, has a long and storied past, enriching our culture since time began (although there were fewer street corners back then). As cities got more crowded and security measures more enhanced, and certainly after 9/11, more regulations have been implemented and enforced.

Unless there are strict anti-busking laws in your area, it\'s usually OK to start performing on public property as long as you\'re not obstructing people or creating a nuisance. If you\'re asked or told to leave, and you donâ(TM)t know the law, the best practice is to just leave.

On private property, however (including many open-air markets and fairs), you should always get permission first. It\'s always best to check the ordinances of the towns in which youâ(TM)d like to perform and then print out whichever rules and regulations protect you. Be forewarned that many places require permits , and many of them require auditions to obtain permits. Some only host auditions only once a year.
â London\'s Underground has a limited number of licenses and requires auditions, which take place once each year.
â Un-amplified busking in New York City is allowed almost everywhere in the city, except within 50 feet of monuments. Performing on a subway platform is protected by the First Amendment, but not if you step onto a train.
â Chicago requires a permit for every public performance, and there are designated hours and noise limitations.
â Boston requires an audition, a criminal background check and liability insurance in order to play in some parts of the city.

Kudos to AidanKS; be sure to check out his post, which has more city-specific information.

Got a permit to play on the streets? That\'s great, but it\'s not good enough to play in most subway/metro stations. Almost every one of these has its own rules and regulations. If you look online, you can find info pertaining to live performances. Here are a few links to visit:

NY MBTA Subway Performers Program
San Francisco BART
DC Metro, section 100.10

There are organizations popping up all around the world to connect buskers and help share information, including and

Knowledge is power. Be prepared to combat ignorance, and go forth and engage in your chosen âoefree speech activity.â You can make the world a brighter place.

Singer-songwriter Laura Zucker wins over audiences with a hard-won perspective and a positive spin. The imagery of her songs and stories ring so true you might think sheâ(TM)s read your diaryâ"and youâ(TM)ll find yourself humming her melodies for days. Sheâ(TM)s a two-time finalist in the Kerrville Folk Festival New Folk competition in Texas, winner of the 2013 West Coast Songwriters Association Best Song of the Year and has received numerous accolades and awards from the organizations around the world. She has released four CDs of original songs with the latest, Life Wide Open, released in late 2013. Find tour dates, music and more at

Link to Original Source
The Internet

Submission + - The Year the Internet Split in Half (

Velcroman1 writes: If there's one thing 2011 will be remembered for, it'll be the year the Internet split in half. In one corner, we have the traditional web, the one you've known and loved since the 90s. In the other corner, there's the "app" or mobile Internet. It's the one ushered in by the iPhone, and it grew to record levels last year with help from Android, iPads, and tablets. And increasingly, there's different stuff on them.

"There's definitely a big rift between traditional Internet content accessed via a web browser and mobile applications on smartphones and tablets," Engadget editor-in-chief Tim Stevens said. "Five to 10 years ago people were getting excited about new websites. Now it's all about new apps." As a result, software developers and content producers are splitting their workload. Sometimes they release stuff on one or the other platform, but not always both. They publish on the Internet — but not every version of the Internet.

Comment When there is financial incentive (Score 2) 84

People get creative. In this case, the sale of the drugs provides the incentive and the network throughout a non-cellular covered area is the resulting creativity. WE (the technically oriented community) should be doing this as well with 802.11 networks. I imagine a day where everywhere you go, you can stay connected for general (non-secure) data transfer / searches, etc.

Submission + - SPAM: Solar-Powered Airplane Completes First Ever Flight

liqs8143 writes: "Solar Impulse, a fully solar-powered airplane has completed the world's first international solar-powered flight. After a flight lasting 12 hours 59 minutes at an altitude of 12,400 feet, using no fuel and propelled by solar energy alone, Solar Impulse HB-SIA landed safely in Brussels, Switzerland.

After the landing, plane's co-founder Bertrand Piccard said:

Our goal is to create a revolution in the minds of the people . . . to promote solar energies — not necessarily a revolution in aviation.

Compared with 2003, energy efficiency has increased from 16 to 22 percent. And the cells are now half as thick.

The project has a total cost of $88 million which is funded by mostly-Swiss partners and public donations."

Link to Original Source

Submission + - The World's Largest Water Pump in New Orleans (

hasanabbas1987 writes: "When nature strikes, man always look for alternatives to fight back, failing on most occasions though. This time when nature showed its anger in the Mississippi River, man again decided to act, this time they have decided to build the world’s largest water pump in New Orleans. This monster pump is powered by a 5,000 horsepower diesel engine which moves a giant four blade propeller 150 times in a minute. As a result 150,000 gallons of water is moved every second (15 Olympic size swimming pools every minute)."

Submission + - Europe Defends 'Stupid' Galileo Satellite (

mvar writes: Following the dismissal of OHB-System's CEO Berry Smutny who, according to a Wikileaks cable, had stated that "Galileo is a stupid idea that primarily serves French interests" , Antonio Tajani Vice President of the European Commission has stated once again that "The Galileo project is going ahead, the commission has decided on this" and that "[Galileo] will improve the lives of citizens in sectors such as transport, agriculture, energy and combatting illegal immigration". Tajani also dismissed the Wikileaks report saying that he had met Smutny before the leak and that he had stated that he believed in Galileo.
Open Source

Submission + - Interesting Twist in the openSUSE Board Elections (

An anonymous reader writes: OpenSUSE packager Nelson Marques invokes Nietzsche, Stallman, and Gandhi in defense of Sirko Kemter , the member who was expelled from the community by the board earlier.

Submission + - Portal 2 For PS3 To Include Cross-Platform Support (

Blacklaw writes: Valve has confirmed plans to resurrect something which hasn't been attempted for quite some time in a mainstream game: cross-platform multiplayer gaming, due to hit the PlayStation 3 and PC in the company's first-person puzzle title Portal 2.
In even better news, those who buy Portal 2 for the PS3 — which Valve's Gabe Newell claims will "be the best console version of the product" — will be able to link their PlayStation Network accounts with their Steam accounts and unlock a free, full copy of the game for PC or Mac.

The Internet

Submission + - What happens when mom unplugs teens for 6 months? (

suraj.sun writes: Susan Maushart lived out every parent's fantasy: She unplugged her teenagers. For six months, she took away the Internet, TV, iPods, cell phones and video games. The result of what she grandly calls "The Experiment" was more OMG than LOL — and nothing less than an immersion in RL (real life).

As Maushart explains in a book released in the U.S. this week called "The Winter of Our Disconnect", she and her kids rediscovered small pleasures — like board games, books, lazy Sundays, old photos, family meals and listening to music together instead of everyone plugging into their own iPods.

Maushart wrote that her kids "awoke slowly from the state of cognitus interruptus that had characterized many of their waking hours to become more focused logical thinkers." Maushart decided to unplug the family because the kids — ages 14, 15 and 18 when she started The Experiment — didn't just "use media," as she put it. They "inhabited" media. "They don't remember a time before e-mail, or instant messaging, or Google," she wrote

Yahoo News:


Submission + - New camera adds a zoom to the "human eye" (

An anonymous reader writes: Researchers have created a camera that mimics the human eye, but has the added feature of zooming . The "eyeball camera" — more officially dubbed a curvilinear camera — was created by scientists from Northwestern University and the University of Illinois in the US. One version is the size of a coin and cheap to make, but takes crisp images at up to 3.5x optical zoom. Other variations could allow for an even greater zoom, the researchers said.

Scientist Says NASA Must Study Space Sex 389

Velcroman1 writes "NASA has always been tight lipped on the subject of sex in space — which makes people all the more curious. How would it work? Has anyone done it before? Can a child be conceived in zero-G? With few animal tests (and virtually no human testing), there's been next to no scientific analysis of the issue. Until now. The Journal of Cosmology has published a special issue detailing the mission to Mars, which touches all the bases. In a chapter titled Sex on Mars, Dr. Rhawn Joseph from the Brain Research Laboratory in California discusses everything from the social conditions that would push astronauts to have sex to the possibility of the first child being born on another planet. Such an infant would be the first real Martian — at least by nationality, the researcher pointed out. 'On Mars, the light's going to be different, the gravity will be different, it's a completely different atmosphere,' he said. 'So if you put an infant on Mars, they would adapt to varying degrees of the new environment. And after several generations, you'd have a new species,' he said."

Comment Re:Loan from government? (Score 2, Informative) 392

When a utiltiy builds a nuclear power plant, they are not only funding the cost of the plant itself, they are also funding 100% of your fuel cost up front plus containment and future disposal costs. See for the basis for some realistic cost estimates.

While it is cheaper for the consumer in the long run to run nuclear, there is a huge up front cost associated. Most banks will not accept the risks without an expensive reward. Governments can finance these types of needed infrastructure loans at a much better rate and reap the rewards (cheaper energy for the masses). If given the choice for the utilities to use an expensive bank loan or a cheap government loan, I am going to hope they choose cheap government loan. All of the costs of producing power are passed on to the customer in the rates paid by the customer. Utilities are regulated entities, and as such, are entitled to recoup the cost of providing service to the customer in the rate charged.

Neckties strangle clear thinking. -- Lin Yutang