Please create an account to participate in the Slashdot moderation system


Forgot your password?
Slashdot Deals: Deal of the Day - Pay What You Want for the Learn to Code Bundle, includes AngularJS, Python, HTML5, Ruby, and more. ×

Submission + - SPAM: Wearables take to the sky with easyJet smart uniforms

stephendavion writes: easyJet has unveiled its 2016 uniforms that feature in-built sensors and LED lights. The garments will be used by engineers, crew and pilots, and will feature a set of microphones so staff can communicate with each other. Cabin crew's uniforms will also be fitted with LED lights on the shoulders that continuously display the flight's number and destination.

Submission + - Prison Hack Show Attorney-Client Privilege Violation (

Advocatus Diaboli writes: "An enormous cache of phone records obtained by The Intercept reveals a major breach of security at Securus Technologies, a leading provider of phone services inside the nation’s prisons and jails. The materials — leaked via SecureDrop by an anonymous hacker who believes that Securus is violating the constitutional rights of inmates — comprise over 70 million records of phone calls, placed by prisoners to at least 37 states, in addition to links to downloadable recordings of the calls. The calls span a nearly two-and-a-half year period, beginning in December 2011 and ending in the spring of 2014."

"Particularly notable within the vast trove of phone records are what appear to be at least 14,000 recorded conversations between inmates and attorneys, a strong indication that at least some of the recordings are likely confidential and privileged legal communications — calls that never should have been recorded in the first place. The recording of legally protected attorney-client communications — and the storage of those recordings — potentially offends constitutional protections, including the right to effective assistance of counsel and of access to the courts."

Submission + - Getting Started with GNU Radio (

An anonymous reader writes: Software Defined Radio must be hard to create, right? Tools like GNU Radio and GNU Radio Companion make it much easier to build radios that can tune AM, FM, and even many digital modes. Of course, you need some kind of radio hardware, right? Not exactly. Hackaday has one of their video hands on tutorials about how to use GNU Radio with no extra hardware (or, optionally, a sound card that you probably already have). The catch? Well, you can't do real radio that way, but you can learn the basics and do audio DSP. The next installment promises to use some real SDR hardware and build an actual radio. But if you ever wanted to see if it was worth buying SDR hardware, this is a good way to see how you like working with GNU Radio before you spend any money.

Comment Re:Damn it! (Score 1) 142

It's subconscious and there's nothing to be done about it - it's an instantaneous judgement.

Only if you believe that the object in question is actually "better". For example, when I see someone with "Beats" headphones on, I instantly judge them to be trend-following sheeple, not somehow superior. Others may consider Beats to be good headphones, but I'm not one of them.

Marvelous! The super-user's going to boot me! What a finely tuned response to the situation!