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Comment: Don't like it but... (Score 1) 788

by MrWa (#27496977) Attached to: Obama Administration Defends Warrantless Wiretapping
Sure, it's one thing to take a position when campaigning but now that he is in office and this decision was made you need to ask yourself if a) you think Obama is the same as Bush or b) after taking ownership of the problem they found something that, if released during a trial, actually would be a problem larger than defending the companies that cooperated?

Comment: Re:about (Score 2, Funny) 605

by MrWa (#27195733) Attached to: My longest stretch without sleep (catnaps count) ...
In college I got paid an extraordinarily small amount of money to participate in a sleep deprivation test. 72 hrs without sleep, stimulants supplied as needed. At the end of the 72 hrs, I was then connected to a bundle of monitoring wires, hit with more stimulants and placed in a sensory deprivation tank. I do not know how long I was in the tank, I do not remember being removed from the tank. I also never found out what they were trying to prove! It was most definitely not worth the money.

Hi. I would like to apologize for everyone that read this post. As the administrator of said sleep deprivation test it was a mistake to allow the participant to access to the internet while still inside the sensory deprivation tank. Please do not inform Tehrasha that he was never removed from the tank.

Thank you.

Software

+ - Organizing your files

Submitted by
Thor
Thor writes "Over the years, a significant number of files have accumulated on my hard drive. I am not a very organized person, and this has naturally materialized itself in how these files have been (dis)organized. I have a 'Backup' folder. I have a 'Backup' folder inside of the 'Backup' folder. I have a 'Stuff' folder with an older 'Stuff' folder inside of it. My desktop is completely cluttered with icons, which will eventually end up in the 'Stuff' folder. You get the picture.

I presume that other people have the same problem. Further, I optimistically presume that they must have solved it in some glorious way that I am tragically unaware of. What I'm (presumably) looking for is some piece of software that will do the grunt work of sorting through my files, perhaps by following some sort of ruleset, placing them in categorized folders. Perhaps some kind of Bayesian filtering with a training window popping up when I drop new files on my desktop?

NOTE: I am a fan of Linux, but due to various circumstances, I use Windows XP as my desktop OS."
PlayStation (Games)

LittleBigPlanet Goes Gold, Trophies Leaked 51

Posted by Soulskill
from the big-little-project dept.
Upcoming world creation game LittleBigPlanet has gone gold, and will be officially released on Oct. 21st in the US. The game will come out exclusively for the PS3, in part due to the fact that it fills up a Blu-ray disc. The list of trophies was leaked alongside the announcement. Groups of students at Parsons will be using a 24-hour period this weekend to create levels for the game. Gamespy has a collection of videos and previews for LittleBigPlanet. To protect users' creations, it will feature an in-game copyright system.
Government

Appeals Court Rules US Can Block Mad Cow Testing 455

Posted by kdawson
from the please-pass-the-lentils dept.
fahrbot-bot tips a story of mad cow disease, a private meat packer that wants to test all of its beef for the disease, and the USDA, which controls access to the test kits and just won an appeals court ruling that the government has the authority to block testing above and beyond the 1% the agency performs. Creekstone Farms Premium Beef sought to test 100% of its beef, in order to reassure its export markets, especially Japan and South Korea, that its beef is safe. Large meat packers opposed any such private testing, because they feared they would be forced into 100% testing and would have to raise prices. The appeals court ruled, 2 to 1, that under a 1913 law, test kits that are used only after an animal is killed still constitute "diagnosis" and "treatment" — this for a disease that has no treatment and is 100% fatal — and therefore fall under the USDA's authority to regulate.
Google

Outages Leave Google Apps Admins In the Hotseat 260

Posted by kdawson
from the clouds-in-my-coffee dept.
snydeq writes "This week's Google outages left several Google Apps admins in the lurch — and many of them are second-guessing their advocacy for making the switch to hosted apps, InfoWorld reports. The outages, which affected both Gmail and Apps, 'could serve as a deterrent to some IT and business managers who might not be ready to ditch conventional software packages that are installed on their servers,' according to the article. 'If we began to experience a similar outage more than about two or three business hours per quarter, we'd probably make Google Apps and Gmail a backup solution to a locally hosted mail system, if we used it at all,' said one Apps admin. 'And it would likely be years before we'd try a cloud-based collaborative system again from any vendor.' Coupled with recent Apple and Amazon cloud issues, these Google outages are being viewed by some as big wins for Microsoft."
Data Storage

Western Digital Working On a 20,000 RPM Drive 194

Posted by kdawson
from the positively-supersonic dept.
MrKaos writes "Western Digital seems to be preparing for the onslaught of solid-state drives set to impact its market by developing a 20,000 rpm hard drive. Similar to the VelociRaptor line of drives, the new drives are speculated to be offering lower capacity as a tradeoff for faster seek and write times." This report out of Taipei is the only word on the rumored WD 20K drive. It's said to be a 2.5" drive in a 3.5" enclosure, for efficiency of cooling — the arrangement the Register enjoyed poking fun at when the 10K drive was upgraded last month.
Music

Internet Radio's "Last Stand" 316

Posted by kdawson
from the see-i-told-you-there-was-a-wolf dept.
We've been discussing the plight of Internet radio for some time, as the Copyright Royalty Board imposed royalties that industry observers predicted would prove lethal to the nascent industry. We discussed Web radio's day of silence in protest, which won the industry a reprieve, and the futile efforts to find relief in Congress. Now it's looking as if the last act is indeed close. Death Metal Maniac sends along this Washington Post story with extensive quotes from Pandora CEO Tim Westergren, who said: "The moment we think this problem in Washington is not going to get solved, we have to pull the plug because all we're doing is wasting money... We're funded by venture capital. They're not going to chase a company whose business model has been broken." The article estimates that XM Satellite Radio will pay "about 1.6 cents per hour per listener when the new rates are fully adapted in 2010. By contrast, Web radio outlets will pay 2.91 cents per hour per listener." That's 70% of projected revenue for Pandora; smaller players estimate the hit at 100% to 300% of revenue.

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