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Comment: Re:Already has (Score 1) 153

by MrKaos (#49781855) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Will Technology Disrupt the Song?

What I mean is that, for example, often one line ends and the next begins too fast for any normal person to breathe. Rap has some extreme examples of this. I recall a live performance by Eminem a few years ago where he sang most of each line but then had someone else cover the last couple of words so that he could get enough oxygen for the next line.

Maybe the guy was too out of shape to produce a performance? I remember seeing System of a Down not so long ago, when I thought it was dubious they could deliver however they delivered a massive unstoppable two hour set. There is no way a person can deliver those performances if they aren't at the top of their game physically and mentally.

Comment: Re:Already has (Score 1) 153

by MrKaos (#49781783) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Will Technology Disrupt the Song?

Even autotune is mostly used to correct singers who can't hold a specific pitch, not to extend their vocal range or otherwise make it something that can't be sung.

Correcting a singer who can't hold a specific pitch is expanding their vocal range! Maybe from zero to something, but still.

What about in a live setting if the singer is tired or sick and needs help delivering a 'usual' performance as opposed to trying to record a performance that just isn't there? Isn't that what they were made for initially?

Comment: Re:Already has (Score 1, Flamebait) 153

by MrKaos (#49780681) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Will Technology Disrupt the Song?

A lot of post 1990 stuff is very hard to do live, if not impossible.

Later we got auto-tune. That lets people do ridiculous things with their voices, because they can hit notes effortlessly and it becomes more like playing an instrument than actually singing. Add the loudness war in and you get lots of distortion and ringing added into the vocal mix. Real time effects are standard too.

Some great points - which '90's music do you mean?

I'm the lead vocalist in a band and we just recorded an album. I can't stand auto tunas personally and forbid them in the studio - even for back-up singers. Everyone has to be physically fit and my mates tell me I can sing high enough to sound like a chick - if I want to. We have used technology to drive the recording process pretty hard to achieve dynamic range in the recordings for precisely the reasons you cite. I'm so happy people are starting to realize it!!!

Technology has changed the way we record songs because all of the restrictions you had are gone. Our song structure is completely free and we do anything from jazz an pop to blistering heavy metal simply because we can. Having said that we push musically to the creative limits because the technology is stable enough to perform reliably enough for us to take those risks and reproduce it live on instruments.

I don't know if that means if the song structure has changed because of technology or if it means we can finally do what we want musically because the technology can keep up with the structures we want to make. I think it's natural for music to change and now that there is enough CPU time to support it our plans become more ambitious.

Comment: Re:it depends (Score 1) 104

by MrKaos (#49771719) Attached to: Tech Bubble? What Tech Bubble?

I'm convinced that humanity is on the verge of some spectacular innovations

If only the old people died? Am I right?

No, you're not right at all. It's certainly not the message I intend to convey at all. What I'm saying is that the sheer bulk of intrenched capital is the political inertia that has to be overcome.

You start off with 'the previous generation created great things' but then go off on some weirdo tangent that everything has stagnated. That is not true.

Well I'm open to you telling me what radical world changing innovations have occurred from 1965-2015.

You are just being bigoted.

I am not being bigoted. Did you read my comment in full? I said And that's not to say some Baby Boomers aren't capable of 21st century thinking, it's just that there isn't enough of them to make a political difference.

I completely value the wisdom of the older generations and hope that our culture hasn't grown to be so short sighted that it will ignore it.

Comment: Re:How is this tech related? (Score 1) 154

by MrKaos (#49771545) Attached to: EU Drops Plans For Safer Pesticides After Pressure From US

The TPP has serious technology implication in the means of enforcing IP provisions and other areas in addition to environmental issues.

This has nothing to do with TPP. TPP is the "Trans Pacific Partnership". Get out your globe and look at the big blue thing between America and Europe. That is the Atlantic Ocean, not the Pacific. This is about TTIP, not TPP.

From the *second sentence* in the wiki for the TTIP: The American government considers the TTIP a companion agreement to the Trans-Pacific Partnership..

Seriously is there any reason to be so fucking narky when you haven't even researched the sources of information available from a 30 second google search.

Comment: Re:How is this tech related? (Score 4, Insightful) 154

by MrKaos (#49768579) Attached to: EU Drops Plans For Safer Pesticides After Pressure From US

I respectfully disagree. This is an environmental issue. It is an important one but I do not feel it belongs an a tech news aggregator.

The TPP has serious technology implication in the means of enforcing IP provisions and other areas in addition to environmental issues. The main problem is though no one knows what is in it because the negotiations and text are being done in secret so, mainly, it's a structural issue of how law will be framed.

It's the deal to end all deals, where each country gets to sign away it's sovereignty. So, yeah, it's stuff that matters and completely appropriate to discuss.

GUI

Microsoft Tries Another Icon Theme For Windows 10 233

Posted by Soulskill
from the not-solid-color-rectangles dept.
jones_supa writes: Back in February, users decried the new icon look in Windows 10. In response to that feedback, Microsoft has implemented a new icon pack in build 10125, which was leaked early but expected to arrive soon for Technical Preview testers. Screenshots show what the final version of the OS could look like when it goes live this summer. The new icons go all-in on a flat approach, following the same design cues as the rest of the operating system, but the "pixel art" style has been abandoned. Once again, Softpedia asked for user experiences, and this time the comments have been mostly positive.

Comment: it depends (Score 4, Interesting) 104

by MrKaos (#49767825) Attached to: Tech Bubble? What Tech Bubble?

Consider that venture capitalists invest in the exit, not in you having a great time building a great idea into a great company with great people.

Then consider 1915-1965 had innovations like penicillin, the auto mobile, aircraft, the space race, and that 1965-2015 has had the IC and internet as really defining innovations then from that perspective the rate of innovations is on the decline.

All the new "inventions" I can think of that are available to the masses are all designed to improve something that already exists to get people to consume more efficiently. I think this is directly attributable to patent and copyright laws preventing long term economic growth that comes from innovating new things which is the longer term fall out from activities conducted by the music industry and patent trolls. IT is just the most obvious sufferer.

Until the X and Y generations (or N-generation for those born *after* the invention of the internet) start taking political power from the Baby Boomer's we are going to be stuck in 1950's thinking. And that's not to say some Baby Boomers aren't capable of 21st century thinking, it's just that there isn't enough of them to make a political difference.

I'm convinced that humanity is on the verge of some spectacular innovations, like long carbon nano-tubes, genetic and nano engineering. However all of these ideas pale in comparison to the idea that we can change something as simple as the laws that maintain the status quo.

So this cycle of bubble and burst will continue whilst the engines of innovation are suppressed. Who knows when it will burst or deflate - just be ready when it does.

Comment: Re:Short version ... (Score 2) 99

But make no mistake about it, these people aren't going to obey the law unless until they find themselves under threat of being in a cell themselves. And then they'll just pretend to obey the law.

No, they won't. What they will do is prosecute the people who expose them under new anti-whistle blower provisions in the law. Then put those people in jail for daring to defend their country from domestic enemies spreading corruption through the system. If people can't realise the benefits of living with the rule of law, knowing that it applies to everyone, then eventually no one respects the law.

Law enforcement now believes they can do anything they want to achieve their ends. Because they're idiots who don't know or care about the law.

The people rolling out these laws aren't idiots. They know exactly what they are doing and what they want to achieve. We, however, have no idea what the end-game is.

Comment: Re:TIL about wiretapping without wires (Score 3, Interesting) 99

I always assumed that the exception to anti-wiretapping laws for pen registers was some kind of case law.

I speaking from readings of Australian law as it seems we are on the leading edge of destroying the freedom and point of western democracies, however my understanding of the parallel US Act is that this right would have been repealed in the Patriot Act or another act shortly after that one. Specifically US law should now allow for wire-taps/voice-mail/sms and email surveillance without an 'interception warrant' regardless of any case law before 2001. I don't know for sure, but I'd be very surprised if US law doesn't allow the same. Of course it was only meant for Intelligence agencies to us against terrorist operations.

It seems because we don't have a bill of rights like the US or UK the laws get framed here, tested, passed and then the US/UK take out the unconstitutional bits and pass that. I note that the fucked laws passed here because the population are largely apathetic, then they seem to make it to the US/UK lawmakers roughly a year later.

Practical people would be more practical if they would take a little more time for dreaming. -- J. P. McEvoy

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