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Comment: Re:it depends (Score 1) 96

by MrKaos (#49771719) Attached to: Tech Bubble? What Tech Bubble?

I'm convinced that humanity is on the verge of some spectacular innovations

If only the old people died? Am I right?

No, you're not right at all. It's certainly not the message I intend to convey at all. What I'm saying is that the sheer bulk of intrenched capital is the political inertia that has to be overcome.

You start off with 'the previous generation created great things' but then go off on some weirdo tangent that everything has stagnated. That is not true.

Well I'm open to you telling me what radical world changing innovations have occurred from 1965-2015.

You are just being bigoted.

I am not being bigoted. Did you read my comment in full? I said And that's not to say some Baby Boomers aren't capable of 21st century thinking, it's just that there isn't enough of them to make a political difference.

I completely value the wisdom of the older generations and hope that our culture hasn't grown to be so short sighted that it will ignore it.

Comment: Re:How is this tech related? (Score 1) 146

by MrKaos (#49771545) Attached to: EU Drops Plans For Safer Pesticides After Pressure From US

The TPP has serious technology implication in the means of enforcing IP provisions and other areas in addition to environmental issues.

This has nothing to do with TPP. TPP is the "Trans Pacific Partnership". Get out your globe and look at the big blue thing between America and Europe. That is the Atlantic Ocean, not the Pacific. This is about TTIP, not TPP.

From the *second sentence* in the wiki for the TTIP: The American government considers the TTIP a companion agreement to the Trans-Pacific Partnership..

Seriously is there any reason to be so fucking narky when you haven't even researched the sources of information available from a 30 second google search.

Comment: Re:How is this tech related? (Score 4, Insightful) 146

by MrKaos (#49768579) Attached to: EU Drops Plans For Safer Pesticides After Pressure From US

I respectfully disagree. This is an environmental issue. It is an important one but I do not feel it belongs an a tech news aggregator.

The TPP has serious technology implication in the means of enforcing IP provisions and other areas in addition to environmental issues. The main problem is though no one knows what is in it because the negotiations and text are being done in secret so, mainly, it's a structural issue of how law will be framed.

It's the deal to end all deals, where each country gets to sign away it's sovereignty. So, yeah, it's stuff that matters and completely appropriate to discuss.

GUI

Microsoft Tries Another Icon Theme For Windows 10 210

Posted by Soulskill
from the not-solid-color-rectangles dept.
jones_supa writes: Back in February, users decried the new icon look in Windows 10. In response to that feedback, Microsoft has implemented a new icon pack in build 10125, which was leaked early but expected to arrive soon for Technical Preview testers. Screenshots show what the final version of the OS could look like when it goes live this summer. The new icons go all-in on a flat approach, following the same design cues as the rest of the operating system, but the "pixel art" style has been abandoned. Once again, Softpedia asked for user experiences, and this time the comments have been mostly positive.

Comment: it depends (Score 4, Interesting) 96

by MrKaos (#49767825) Attached to: Tech Bubble? What Tech Bubble?

Consider that venture capitalists invest in the exit, not in you having a great time building a great idea into a great company with great people.

Then consider 1915-1965 had innovations like penicillin, the auto mobile, aircraft, the space race, and that 1965-2015 has had the IC and internet as really defining innovations then from that perspective the rate of innovations is on the decline.

All the new "inventions" I can think of that are available to the masses are all designed to improve something that already exists to get people to consume more efficiently. I think this is directly attributable to patent and copyright laws preventing long term economic growth that comes from innovating new things which is the longer term fall out from activities conducted by the music industry and patent trolls. IT is just the most obvious sufferer.

Until the X and Y generations (or N-generation for those born *after* the invention of the internet) start taking political power from the Baby Boomer's we are going to be stuck in 1950's thinking. And that's not to say some Baby Boomers aren't capable of 21st century thinking, it's just that there isn't enough of them to make a political difference.

I'm convinced that humanity is on the verge of some spectacular innovations, like long carbon nano-tubes, genetic and nano engineering. However all of these ideas pale in comparison to the idea that we can change something as simple as the laws that maintain the status quo.

So this cycle of bubble and burst will continue whilst the engines of innovation are suppressed. Who knows when it will burst or deflate - just be ready when it does.

Comment: Re:Short version ... (Score 2) 93

But make no mistake about it, these people aren't going to obey the law unless until they find themselves under threat of being in a cell themselves. And then they'll just pretend to obey the law.

No, they won't. What they will do is prosecute the people who expose them under new anti-whistle blower provisions in the law. Then put those people in jail for daring to defend their country from domestic enemies spreading corruption through the system. If people can't realise the benefits of living with the rule of law, knowing that it applies to everyone, then eventually no one respects the law.

Law enforcement now believes they can do anything they want to achieve their ends. Because they're idiots who don't know or care about the law.

The people rolling out these laws aren't idiots. They know exactly what they are doing and what they want to achieve. We, however, have no idea what the end-game is.

Comment: Re:TIL about wiretapping without wires (Score 3, Interesting) 93

I always assumed that the exception to anti-wiretapping laws for pen registers was some kind of case law.

I speaking from readings of Australian law as it seems we are on the leading edge of destroying the freedom and point of western democracies, however my understanding of the parallel US Act is that this right would have been repealed in the Patriot Act or another act shortly after that one. Specifically US law should now allow for wire-taps/voice-mail/sms and email surveillance without an 'interception warrant' regardless of any case law before 2001. I don't know for sure, but I'd be very surprised if US law doesn't allow the same. Of course it was only meant for Intelligence agencies to us against terrorist operations.

It seems because we don't have a bill of rights like the US or UK the laws get framed here, tested, passed and then the US/UK take out the unconstitutional bits and pass that. I note that the fucked laws passed here because the population are largely apathetic, then they seem to make it to the US/UK lawmakers roughly a year later.

Comment: Re:Are they LEOs (Score 4, Insightful) 93

At a 2008 "distressed investors" forum, Ron Bloom, appointed Senior Counselor to President Obama for Manufacturing Policy in September 2009, said:

"Generally speaking, we get the joke. We know that the free market is nonsense. We know that the whole point is to game the system, to beat the market. Or at least find someone who will pay you a lot of money, 'cause they're convinced that there is a free lunch. We know this is largely about power, that it's an adults-only, no-limit game. We kind of agree with Mao, that political power comes largely from the barrel of a gun."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v...

Moderated funny, of course because if you don't laugh about it, you'll cry. Big belly laughs instead of uncontrolled sobbing at realising that freedom and democracy were stolen right out from under our noses.

Isn't this the thing the Second amendment was supposed to prevent? By all rights the US Government should be afraid of the American people, however this kind of thing shows they're not. Not that I have anything against firearm ownership however, I think more people should be armed with pens - they're more powerful tool where the state is concerned.

Comment: Re:give us your data (Score 1) 45

by MrKaos (#49748411) Attached to: Rate These 53 Sub-$200 Hacker SBCs, Win 1 of 20

There was no backpeddling. Nothing you've said or pointed out changes that using a throwaway email address makes the information they get useless for identity theft.

A throwaway email address has no impact on the value of the physical, real world address data, it is irrelevant because the real world data does not change often.

The physical address remains the same and it remains a vector for ID theft to anyone creative enough to exploit it. Notice I said "vector" as in one piece of information, not everything. You say you should mock me but your lack of imagination to figure out how it is done is mockable.

Caution isn't paranoia and my point is that you are giving away your address details because you might win a prize. That doesn't change the fact that that information remains a vector for id theft when your original point was about email addresses.

If you don't think it's that bad releasing that information then include your real name, address and the other details in your response with a disposable email address and I'll show you what I can do with that information. I'll guarantee you might win a prize from supplying me with your real name and address.

Comment: Re:give us your data (Score 1) 45

by MrKaos (#49743441) Attached to: Rate These 53 Sub-$200 Hacker SBCs, Win 1 of 20

Knowing a particular email address is associated with a particular interest (e.g. SBCs) on the other hand is not part of public record and something worth a small amount to advertisers for actually knowing, but isn't a slippery slope to identity theft.

My point is every puzzle has a entry point.

Your point Mr A.C was that it was an email address when, in fact, it was a whole lot more. So just stop back-peddling because you are just wasting everybody's time, including your own.

Comment: Re:give us your data (Score 4, Informative) 45

by MrKaos (#49741819) Attached to: Rate These 53 Sub-$200 Hacker SBCs, Win 1 of 20

I would mock your inability to come up with the idea of creating a one-time-use email address but based on your post I probably couldn't make it pedestrian enough for you to understand.

It took me less than 30 seconds to uncover that the survey is asking for the following data:

  • Name
  • Company
  • Address
  • Address 2
  • City/Town
  • State/Province
  • ZIP/Postal Code
  • Country
  • Email Address
  • Phone Number

I would mock your inability to click a link and *read* it, your inability to understand that you can only claim a prize by providing the correct information to these question but it is clear that you are ignorant.

As for being 'one of those people' the answer is yes. I am 'one of those people who avoid creating vectors for identity theft'. Perhaps, one day, you'll be one of those people who whine and moan about the problems being a victim of ID theft has brought you however since you are ignorant the thinking would probably hurt you.

Memory fault - where am I?

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