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Comment: Whats the alternative then? (Score 1) 291

by MrBandersnatch (#48468315) Attached to: Is Ruby On Rails Losing Steam?

I still would find myself hard pressed to select a language and framework that would get a vanilla CRUD based site or backend up and running as quickly as one can with RoR.

Python/Django is heading there but I find Python to be less productive as a language and I've shot myself in the foot a few times due to whitespace issues (especially when refactoring). MS languages are a no-no until they bite the bullet and officially support *nix based system; Java ... shoot me; Scala .. shoot me twice! (and then once more for mercy), Go just doesn't have the productivity benefits, although I'd stand being convinced there; nodejs ... good in the early stages but I find that maintainability suffers as applications scale; PHP/Laravel ... well again, maybe, I've not really looked.

I actually do not like Rails I should also mention - rather than refine the framework it has become a bloated mixed bag of goodies much like the paradigms it replaced, so I would be genuinely interested in opinions on the alternatives.

Comment: I'm a Ruby guy but... (Score 4, Insightful) 466

sorry there is no one-size fits all solution. The *closest* is Javascript and client-side development isn't that painfull these days but its still Javscript and WILL bite you on the ass.

So I'd say it boils down to either Python or Ruby + Javascript and if I'm honest, I'd say Python has the edge in terms of general applicability. I *personally* prefer the Ruby language, but that's not what you're asking. Breaking it down:

Server side, backend = Python+Django OR Ruby+Rails if you want to get stuff done and stay sane. Ruby should be considered Linux only server side, but then server-side should be considered *nix only. Node works but...its javascript.
Server side Scripting = Python/Ruby are both sensible choices. I prefer Ruby as a language but Python is a safer choice given the library support and performance. The exception is server/cloud management for which Ruby still has an edge (debatable, I know).
GUI/Desktop Clients, Python + QT. Great combination. Its possible to use QT with Ruby, it just doesnt feel right though.
OSX/IoS/Android - Ruby/Rubymotion. Really, really nice if you're developing for the Apple side. Android support is early days.
Browser - Javascript + Framework + UI components of choice. Learn javascript, one framework and one set of UI components and you're set. Well, until you need something a bit different....but its Javascript.

BTW I said I'm a Ruby guy but I've 10 years of Python experience. If the project is suitable though I'm more productive with Ruby (with 18 months experience) but it really is a case of the right tool for the right job.

Comment: Re:Guys seriously please dont hate us! (Score 5, Informative) 698

by MrBandersnatch (#45713885) Attached to: NSA Says It Foiled Plot To Destroy US Economy Through Malware

I thought it was odd too untli I read the article and realised they were not talking about a real threat, they were talking about an analysts scenario. To quote:

"One of our analysts actually saw that the nation state had the intention to develop and to deliver — to actually use this capability — to destroy computers."

So basically this is a fear-mongering story since if the country in question had had the intention and capability to deploy such an attack, it would have been SUCCESSFUL. Only a small proportion on PCs would have been "fixed" if they had "worked with computer manufacturers".

They really do think everyone is stupid don't they?

Comment: Culture of fear? (Score 1) 240

by MrBandersnatch (#44265631) Attached to: Maybe Steve Ballmer Doesn't Deserve the Hate

I *hear* that MS has a culture of fear, where lower levels are basically expected to kowtow to the management line. A company without dissent and an environment where employees can air and discuss their opinions is VERY bad since decision making then lays in the hands of the select few, and when mistakes are being made, people are prevented from even pointing out those mistakes.

So far we've seen the disasters of Surface pro, Windows 8 metro, XBone, and I'm sure there are others I'm missing. That a company could have such a litany of product disasters suggests that the culture doesn't exist where *innovative & good* products can be made anymore (MS does have good products but these tend to be either their mainstays e.g. office, rebadged hardware).

The blame for this *has* to rest at the top.

"In the face of entropy and nothingness, you kind of have to pretend it's not there if you want to keep writing good code." -- Karl Lehenbauer

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