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Comment: Why do they need to unlock it? (Score 5, Informative) 465

by Mr. Sketch (#46416287) Attached to: Apple Refuses To Unlock Bequeathed iPad

Did she bequeath the iPad or the apps/data on the iPad and the iTunes account to go with it? I'm pretty sure that even if the device is locked, that you can still do a factory reset on it and then have access to the iPad. Granted you would lose all the apps and data on the device, but you would still have the device to use as you wish.

If she bequeathed the iTunes account, then the account email and password should have been in the will or related documents, if not, then it's reasonable to assume she just left the hardware which you can reset and then have full use of.

Comment: 45% of all internet subscribers? (Score 1) 160

Since it's unlikely to get 45% of all internet subscribers, consider a reasonable subset of them such as just America/Europe subscribers. However, if it were $50 and I had access to every movie/TV show ever made, I'd pay that every month, and they would probably only need the America/Europe market. Maybe an extra $20/mo for access to 'new releases' provided they were available on the standard plan after maybe 60 (90?) days. They could even do an extra 'HD' surcharge of $20-$30/mo I used to pay more than that for cable and only got access to whatever the channels were running at that time (maybe time-shifted with a DVR, but still required them to run it at some point while my DVR was recording and still had to deal with commercials). I would definitely pay that for access to everything that I could easily search and select from a list and instantly start watching something.

Netflix Instant is nice and all, but it doesn't have the best selection. I've found most of the streaming sites (Netflix Instant, Hulu Plus, and Amazon Prime), all have about the same stuff. I stream a lot from home, but we always run the risk that the streaming provider could drop a show I like at any point. I think paying a premium to ensure it's always available and that everything ever made is available, is worth it.

Obviously, this is an amazing idea that would revolutionize media content for this new internet age, which means it will never happen.

Comment: Define: 'My Media' (Score 1) 187

by Mr. Sketch (#45727773) Attached to: How much of your media do you store locally?

If I have Netflix streaming, I can watch thousands of movies and TV shows that are not stored locally, so are those 'mine'?

If so, then I have about 0.0000000000001% of my media stored locally since the vast majority of it is accessed on the cloud.

In terms of media that I watch, I stream about 1000 shows or movies for every 1 that might watch from a local collection (if ever).

Crime

TSA Union Calls For Armed Guards At Every Checkpoint 603

Posted by timothy
from the more-effective-than-at-the-post-office dept.
Hugh Pickens DOT Com writes "Brian Tumulty writes at USA Today that the union representing airport screeners for the Transportation Security Administration says Friday's fatal shooting of an agent at Los Angeles International Airport highlights the need for armed security officers at every airport checkpoint. The screeners, who earn up to $30,000 annually, have not requested to carry guns themselves, but they do want an armed security officer present at every checkpoint says J. David Cox Sr., president of the American Federation of Government Employees, which represents the screeners. "Every local airport has its own security arrangement with local police to some type of contract security force," says Cox. "There is no standardization throughout the country. Every airport operates differently. Obviously at L.A. there were a fair number of local police officers there." Congress may investigate the issue but Sen. Tom Carper, the chairman of the Senate Homeland Security Committee, says that "there will be an appropriate time — after all the facts have been gathered and thoughtfully analyzed —to review existing policy and procedure to see what, if anything, can be learned from this unfortunate incident to help prevent future tragedies." TSA officials say that they don't anticipate a change in the agency security posture at the moment, but "passengers may see an increased presence of local law enforcement officers throughout the country.""
Mozilla

Cisco Releases Open Source "Binary Module" For H.264 In WebRTC 95

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the bait-and-switch dept.
SD-Arcadia writes "Mozilla Blog: 'Cisco has announced today that they are going to release a gratis, high quality, open source H.264 implementation — along with gratis binary modules compiled from that source and hosted by Cisco for download. This move enables any open source project to incorporate Cisco's H.264 module without paying MEPG LA license fees. Of course, this is not a not a complete solution. In a perfect world, codecs, like other basic Internet technologies such as TCP/IP, HTTP, and HTML, would be fully open and free for anyone to modify, recompile, and redistribute without license agreements or fees. Mozilla is fully committed to working towards that better future. To that end, we are developing Daala, a fully open next generation codec. Daala is still under development, but our goal is to leapfrog H.265 and VP9, building a codec that will be both higher-quality and free of encumbrances.'"

Comment: I/O Bandwidth (Score 3, Interesting) 84

by Mr. Sketch (#45018233) Attached to: Software Rendering Engine GPU-Accelerated By WebCL

Many 3D engines are carefully tuned to the limited bandwidth to the GPU cards that provides them just enough bandwidth per frame to transfer the necessary geometry/textures/etc for that frame. The results, of course, stay on the GPU card and are just outputted to the frame buffer. Now, in addition to that existing overhead, the engine writer would now have to transfer back the results/frame buffer back to the CPU to process, generate an image, that is then passed back to the GPU to be displayed as an image? Or am I missing something?

While I'm sure it would allow customized algorithms, they would have to be rather unique to not be handled by the current state of geometry/vertex/fragment shaders. Are they thinking some of non-triangular geometry?

Maybe there is a way to send the result of the maths directly to the frame buffer while it's on the GPU?

Comment: Re:How Blackberry could remain relevant (Score 1) 278

by Mr. Sketch (#44998821) Attached to: How BlackBerry Blew It

Samsung did this already. It's called Knox. As most Android vendors have discovered, competing with Samsung is a losing proposition.

True, but if anyone could compete with Samsung in the mindshare of the enterprise, it would be Blackberry. Samsung is pouring tons of money into building their mindshare and awareness in the enterprise space, something that Blackberry already has.

If that could easily be done, they would have done it for BB 10. And honestly, can you name one BlackBerry app worth having that doesn't exist on Android already? Ironically, BB did build Android compatibility into BB 10... but it apparently hasn't made the platform any more popular.

Yes, I was thinking later that this was more optional and extraneous. It would depend on how many enterprise apps were already custom made for Blackberry, not for games or other novelties that are Blackberry-only.

Comment: How Blackberry could remain relevant (Score 3, Interesting) 278

by Mr. Sketch (#44996481) Attached to: How BlackBerry Blew It

Blackberry could succeed on their name, if they tweaked their brand a little and adopt a more 'Samsung' approach. Their name is already synonymous with enterprise level email, service and solutions, so capitalize on that, just with a different platform.

  • 1. Create an enterprise hardened version of Android
  • 2. Integrate with their existing Blackberry Enterprise Server (and of course other email providers, but provide a good business case for using their services like uptime, security, no NSA snooping, etc
  • 3. Provide a compatibility layer/VM for existing Blackberry apps on their devices

This would provide end users with a standard Android platform just with more security features (maybe fingerprint, retina scan, whatever, and market it for security conscious individuals), and it would provide enterprises with a trusted platform.

Individuals will still get an Android platform with all those apps, and Businesses will get a platform that plugin into a standard Android ecosystem.

Anyways, those are my thoughts about how they could still make it work

BTW, Blackberry, if you're looking for a new CEO or VP-level manager to implement this solution, I'm available.

Security

WeChat IM Application Could Disclose Your Password To Attackers 49

Posted by Soulskill
from the conveniently-facilitates-account-sharing dept.
New submitter soulflyz writes "Security researchers found some security issues in WeChat, a popular instant messaging application developed by the Chinese company Tencet. By exploiting these vulnerabilities, any other application installed on the user's phone can force WeChat to send the user's password hash (in plain MD5 format) to an external web server, controlled by the attacker. Android versions of WeChat up to 4.5.1 are confirmed to be vulnerable, but similar issues could interest also other versions of the application. According to recent statistics, WeChat should have about 300 million registered users."

It is the quality rather than the quantity that matters. - Lucius Annaeus Seneca (4 B.C. - A.D. 65)

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