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Comment: Re:User Beware (Score 1) 349

by Mr. Shotgun (#47385205) Attached to: Qualcomm Takes Down 100+ GitHub Repositories With DMCA Notice

Sadly, I expect this incident to be forgotten over the weekend and cause no harm to GitHub's reputation.

GitHub has it's hand tied as to what it can do in response to DMCA claims because of the safe harbor provisions. They have to treat each claim as valid and take the supposedly infringing content down. I would rather people remember Qualcomm's heavy handed and ridiculously over-broad copyright claims when it comes to selecting products and business partners. I also hope some of the people who were affected by this stunt file a counter notice and take this to court, hopefully exposing these claims as a sham and willful perjury. But that is unlikely to happen because there repositories are most likely independent developers and small businesses who can hardly afford a protracted legal fight.

Comment: Re:I'd love some free Google classes (Score 1) 374

by Mr. Shotgun (#47339323) Attached to: Google Is Offering Free Coding Lessons To Women and Minorities

Google wants employees with above-average skills in their areas of interest, and so they hire plenty of white males since they tend to have them. If you're not in that group, well, it sucks to be you, I guess

/s/white/people who have an interest/g Seriously, when did asian's become white? If anyone showed an interest in what Google, facebook, yahoo is looking for they would have showed up on their radar, melanin rate be damned..

Comment: Re:Destroying evidence should have worse penalty (Score 5, Informative) 269

In general I think that destroying evidence should result in the assumption that they're hiding a worst case scenario

That is exactly what is supposed to happen, it is called spoilation of evidence and is very frowned upon. The penalties are supposed to include inferring that the missing evidence is beneficial to the opposing party and civil and criminal penalties against whomever destroyed the evidence. Though I doubt that will happen in this case.

Comment: Re:It's a 1A issue, not a 2A issue. (Score 1) 354

by Mr. Shotgun (#47161447) Attached to: 3D Printed Gun Maker Cody Wilson Defends Open Source Freedom

Fire in a crowded theater...if you knew the case behind that piece of hackneyed trash you would never dare utter it in polite company again! Mr white has an excellent take down of that piece of claptrap you call a justification here. Short story, it was used to justify the punishment of critics of the government under the espionage act. Three men where sentenced to ten years under those decisions for writing rather mild criticisms of the draft and government. If he were alive today he would of had code pink clapped in irons. And if prison for criticizing the government sounds like the kind of thing you can endorse and stand behind then you do not belong in this country at all. Go be a sycophant somewhere else.

Comment: Re: Irresponsible (Score 1) 354

by Mr. Shotgun (#47161279) Attached to: 3D Printed Gun Maker Cody Wilson Defends Open Source Freedom

The ATF doesn't agree with you. People, not the milita but people, are free to make their own handguns/shotguns/rifles as long as it is not intended for sale. 1st amendment allows Mr Wilson to publish the plans, and the 2nd amendment allows individuals to use those plans to make a weapon. Quite frankly I am not sure how much more settled it could be.

Comment: Re:Duh... (Score 2) 265

by Mr. Shotgun (#47062745) Attached to: IT Pro Gets Prison Time For Sabotaging Ex-Employer's System

Former US District attorney and now defense attorney has several great posts on the first rule of dealing with the police and prosecutors, namely shut up. Anything you may think you can say to help the police can be said with the representation of a lawyer. If, after reading through those examples and explanations, you still wonder why everyone says to shut up then there is no convincing you and you can go on your merry way. May you never have to deal with the police when there are looking to pin someone for a crime and you happen to be in the area.

Comment: Re:Let them legislate all they want (Score 1) 584

So let me get this straight, a LEO's weapon, without the watch and any mechanical safeties engaged will fire like normal weapon aka a gun.

Meanwhile a civilian's weapon without a watch or with a watch with error code 0xDD screaming Abort,Retry, Fail, without mechanical safeties engaged will not fire, aka a club.

Yeah, and people wonder why others are complaining about that

Comment: Re:Isn't this obvious? (Score 1) 584

What's really going on is that pro-gun groups are pretty certain (with good reason!) that these smart guns don't work reliably, and likely never will. Plus there's some concern about backdoors that might allow the guns to be deliberately disabled, which could enable smart gun mandates to easily turn into forcible disarmament.

One concern that I have is regarding Copyright/patents on this smart gun. Considering it is a new direction in firearms it would be naive to assume this weapon does not have any intellectual property restrictions regarding the technology. Coupling the smart gun mandates already proposed in places like California and New Jersey with the defacto monopoly on smart guns that the patent/copyright provides would mean that where the mandate is in place the smart gun manufacturer would have total monopoly on new weapons sales for at least 20 years. Unless of course they chose to license the technology, but they may not as is their right. Still one easily see how IP law and knee jerk feel good legislation can combine to create market monopolies or even destroy potential markets.

Comment: Re:BS (Score 1) 175

by Mr. Shotgun (#46911443) Attached to: Free Can Make You Bleed: the Underresourced Open Source

The best part is that not even two weeks after heartbleed was disclosed, Fire eye announced a vulnerability in IE that affects everything from 6 to the latest release 11. In response to the wide range of the vulnerability several agencies declared IE persona non grata till it is fixed. So much for commercial software being more secure.

Comment: Re:Bu the wasn't fired (Score 1) 1116

by Mr. Shotgun (#46701449) Attached to: Mozilla CEO Firestorm Likely Violated California Law

if the company hires black CEO and customer leave because of that, CEO should step down?

From a pure business perspective, if a significant portion of the customer base leaves, then yes. Luckily in this day and age the percentage of customers that would leave because of a black CEO is negligible. Wouldn't it be nice if the same thing would be true of LGBT CEO's?

Comment: Re:Are programmers really this naive? (Score 2) 465

You can use wikipedia but can't read the damn article?

That natal idea, and one of the themes central to all eleven developers agreeing to travel to Los Angeles for the shoot, was the production and filming of a game jam for a televised audience (or at least a YouTube audience) with the intent to document the ups and downs of actually developing a game

TL?DR? Maker pitched a documentary to the developers, then tried to change it into a reality show

Comment: Re:So what was the problem again? (Score 3, Informative) 465

Basically he went on a game show

From the fucking article:

That natal idea, and one of the themes central to all eleven developers agreeing to travel to Los Angeles for the shoot, was the production and filming of a game jam for a televised audience (or at least a YouTube audience) with the intent to document the ups and downs of actually developing a game

The developers agreed to produce a documentary, it was the sponsors that tried to turn it into a reality show. The only drama they were expecting was game crashes and bug fixes, ordinary issues that occur when developing a game.

Also FTFA:

At some point which remains unclear, the show wholly dipped into a scripted reality slant and became less about making a game, and more about creating drama for sake of the audience, less than one day out of the four blocked off for shooting available to sit down and jam. The rest of the program, as it turned out, was filled with arts and crafts, physical challenges and competitive gaming â" once again, totally unrelated to game development. But that wasnâ(TM)t communicated to anyone, and through Polarisâ(TM) local contacts, the developers were signed up and flown out to Culver City, where they awaited their first hurdle in Makerâ(TM)s legal department.

So not only did the developers initially agree to the documentary format, but when the format was changed no one thought to ask the developers if they were ok with this? I am guessing that if they had known beforehand they would not have come. When they did find out they rejected the initial contract and had reservations about the show. This snowballed because of Matti Leshem's attempts to impose branding restrictions and incite drama where there was none, causing the developers to form ranks and reject the show entirely. They decided they didn't have to stand the shit and instead threw it back in the producers faces. and I really can't blame them. Next time the companies want to make a reality show, tell the actors first.

"But this one goes to eleven." -- Nigel Tufnel

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