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Comment: XBMC Finally? (Score 1) 138

by Mr. Droopy Drawers (#48564267) Attached to: $35 Quad-core Hacker SBC Offers Raspberry Pi-like Size and I/O
Does this one have enough horsepower to act as a decently performing media center? I'd like to stream Blue Ray mk4s. I love Raspberry Pis in projects such as my animatronic project, Jose' The Tiki Bird. But, it just doesn't have the guts as a media center.

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Is this the one I've been waiting for?

Comment: Raspberry Pi in the Tiki Room (Score 1) 146

by Mr. Droopy Drawers (#48131945) Attached to: Raspberry Pi Sales Approach 4 Million

I bought my RPi as the primary interface for my Tiki Bird. Really enjoyed the project. Lot's of good open source stuff available. WiringPi for GPIO control. Vixen for sequencing. LIRC for infrared control.

I also enjoyed doing autopsy on a Squawkers McCaw. It's incredible the amount of sensing and control they packed into such a cheap toy.

Remember, The Bird is the Word!

Comment: Re:yeah whatever (Score 1) 225

I do agree that malicious extensions could be a problem when allowed via sideloading. However, simply add an option to turn off the blocking from the client. Those that want to sideload can and, by default, others will be blocked. Seems like a logical way of handling this.

I do also like the suggestion of providing a "trusted list" that allows for alternative "App Stores". These options could make these actions more palatable.

Comment: Re:wimp (Score 1) 278

by Mr. Droopy Drawers (#46881879) Attached to: The Ways Programming Is Hard

it's a good example. That's not the last I heard. I'm under NDA. But, I can enumerate the multiple bugs we've seen with chips. Your point is valid. It's more about the human/dollar cost of the bugs. As fab costs have fallen and the more use of FPGAs, the cost of mistakes are lower and, therefore, more bugs have crept in.

Make the bug expensive and more discipline will be given to the problem.

Comment: Re:Work on the basics (Score 1) 387

Wish I had mod points... This is the my primary barrier for learning Python (been doing PERL since '94). I like that it has lots of built-ins for web stuff. But, couldn't they use common practices when it comes to syntax and layout?

JS is the lingua franca for front end web use. I like the comparison to annoying relatives :)

Comment: Re:Freeloaders (Score 1) 120

by Mr. Droopy Drawers (#45964347) Attached to: The Role of Freeloaders In Open Source Communities

Agreed. Seems the author is confused between users and Freeloader, in the traditional sense. The Freeloaders are those that incorporate their code into their product and offer that for sale and don't contribute back to the open-source community.

In a certain product for sale, I know of just under 50 open source components (not including core linux) included. All the licenses are complied with. But, few get patches submitted upstream. Some bug reports though.

Does the community need this kind of freeloader? I think so. But, there should be some community responsibility to contribute financially if you're not contributing code.

Comment: Re:Meaningless values are meaningless. (Score 4, Interesting) 134

by Mr. Droopy Drawers (#45897183) Attached to: China Tops Europe In R&D Intensity

agreed. The method in which this is calculated really isn't described either. Even though I'm in a development role, we're pressured to demonstrate "research" when we're really just assembling code.

US/Europe need to actually produce real stuff. Anything else is just proprietary fodder for others to take.

Comment: Re:Safety Bat (Score 1) 51

by Mr. Droopy Drawers (#42195953) Attached to: Original Batmobile To Be Auctioned For the First Time Ever

Lap seat belts were optional on domestic cars from the early 50's through 1967. In 1968, they became mandatory. 1964 was the first year for required padded dashes. The big 3 offered them across the line much earlier though. Shoulder belts became required in 1971.

IIRC, Tucker released the first padded dash on a domestic car.

Comment: Where is HTC One for Verizon? (Score 1) 209

by Mr. Droopy Drawers (#41606151) Attached to: HTC Profits Drop By 79%

HTC,
I went to the Verizon store to pick up a replacement recently. No HTC One? Really? Why?

How I used to love 'ya. I'm still using my HTC Incredible. It's been, well, pretty incredible. Well, until the latest updates came out. I've had more crashes since the last update than I had over the last 3 years.

My next phone won't be an IPhone. It won't be a Windows phone either. What does that leave me with? Motorola? They break promises with 1yr old phones; Should I look at the new RAZR models? Will they get JellyBean? Who knows?

That leaves Samsung.... Is it really so hard to create an Android phone that we can get excited about?

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