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Comment: Re:And this is why Linux will never win the deskto (Score 1) 529

by MouseR (#48189485) Attached to: Debian's Systemd Adoption Inspires Threat of Fork

Actually I can relate. Got my fiancee off Windows and into Ubuntu (latest stable at the time). Initial install was a nightmare to get a bootable installer but once the hurdle gone, installed just fine. Then it was the carrousel of packages, getting het what she needed. Mandarin music player, OpenOffice (the easiest one to get IMO) and other things so she could enjoy a virus-free setup. It just meant days of screwing with a system she just wanted to USE. Not build.

She eventually got a Mac Mini because of house influence. She's been quite happy with it so far. Her last gripe is her Android phone not satisfying. I'm trying not to push her but... this is also an iOS house...

Medicine

3-D Printed "Iron Man" Prosthetic Hands Now Available For Kids 64

Posted by timothy
from the in-time-for-hallowe'en-even dept.
PC World (drawing on an article from 3DPrint.com) notes that inventor Pat Starace has released his plans for a 3-D printable prosthetic hand designed to appeal both to kids who need it and their parents (who can't all afford the cost of conventional prostheses). The hand "has the familiar gold-and-crimson color scheme favored by Ol' Shellhead, and it's designed with housings for a working gyroscope, magnetometer, accelerometer, and other "cool sensors", as well as a battery housing and room for a low-power Bluetooth chip and charging port." It takes about 48 hours in printing time (and "a lot" of support material), but the result is inexpensive and functional.

Comment: Re:yeah, going with not creepy. (Score 1) 130

The idea is that in times of crisis, communications typically break down with over-flooded infrastructures.

This enables quick low-threshold OK-notification that propagate your status without you having to load an entire journal history on login nor requiring potentially more expensive (bandwidth-wise) form of communications like emails.

Transportation

Michigan About To Ban Tesla Sales 292

Posted by samzenpus
from the not-in-my-neighborhood dept.
cartechboy writes It's a story we've come to see quite often: a state trying to ban Tesla's direct sales model. It seems something sneaky just happened in Michigan where Tesla sales are about to be banned. Bill HB 5606 originally intended to offer added protection to franchised dealers and consumers from price gouging by carmakers, and was passed by the Michigan House in September without any anti-Tesla language. However, once it hit the Senate wording was changed that might imply the legality of a manufacturer-owned dealership was removed. The modified bill was passed unanimously by the Senate on October 2, and then sent back to the House that day where it passed with only a single dissenting vote. The bill was modified without any opportunity for public comment. Michigan Governor Rick Snyder has less than a week to sign the bill into law. Of course, Tesla's already fighting this legislation.
Java

Adobe: Click-to-Play Would Have Avoided Flood of Java Zero-days 111

Posted by Soulskill
from the of-pots-and-kettles dept.
mask.of.sanity writes: Oracle could have saved mountains of cash and bad press if Click-to-Play was enabled before Java was hosed by an armada of zero day vulnerabilities, Adobe security boss Brad Arkin says. The simple fix introduced into browsers over the last year stopped the then zero day blitzkrieg in its tracks by forcing users to click a button to enable Java.
Cloud

Department of Defense May Give Private Cloud Vendors Access To Top Secret Data 60

Posted by Soulskill
from the what-could-possibly-go-wrong dept.
An anonymous reader sends news that the U.S. Department of Defense is pondering methods to store its most sensitive data in the cloud. The DoD issued an information request (PDF) to see whether the commercial marketplace can provide remote computing services for Level 5 and Level 6 workloads, which include restricted military data. "The DoD anticipates that the infrastructure will range from configurations featuring between 10,000 and 200,000 virtual machines. Any vendors selected to the scheme would be subject to an accreditation process and to security screening, and the DoD is employing the Federal Risk and Authorization Management Program to establish screening procedures for authorized cloud vendors, and to generate procedures for continuous monitoring and auditing."

Life would be so much easier if we could just look at the source code. -- Dave Olson

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