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Comment: Re:Candy Corn? Bleh! (Score 0) 267 267

It's the Candy Corn Enigma. There's something about candy corn where, no matter how hard some of us try, we just can't remember how bad tastes each year until we pop one in our mouth. My guess is all the votes are from people who have yet to be "reminded" this year. Not to mention that most of the candy corn you'll ever see is probably left overs from the year(s) before.

Comment: Re:What unlimited wireless? (Score 1) 314 314

All the "unlimited wireless" services I've tried are not worth $60 a year. If the speeds and reliability weren't so vastly inferior to home connections, and companies stopped charging extra for tethering, then I might consider it.

Wouldn't that be an amazing world to live in.

Comment: Re:They know that, but that's not the point (Score 1) 217 217

Harming a company and doing something it doesn't appreciate are two different things. If Mad Catz posted information on how their PS3 controllers worked and how to build your own, Sony might not enjoy that information becoming so easily obtainable and understood, but that doesn't make sharing the information illegal.

Comment: This whole thing is completely absurd to me. (Score 1) 217 217

According to another article on Threat Post, it sounds like Sony is essentially saying that this is a problem because it allows for people to run pirated games to be run on a jailbroken PS3. I may not be a legal expert or have read the Digital Millenium Copyright Act cover to cover, but what's illegal about that? Jailbreaking and Pirating are two completely different things. Trying to nail someone for Jailbreaking on the grounds that it leads to Pirating sounds like more of a PR ploy than a legal action to me.

I understand why they don't like it. I just think its absurd that they're taking any action other than trying to make the system more secure.

And for the record, if you ask me, once you buy something, you should be able to do whatever you want with it so long as you're not directly infringing on copyrights (I know as I write this that that's a pretty muddy statement). But there's a clear difference between buying a car and using it to model, reproduce and sell the patented parts vs everything from giving the car a new paint job to installing a nitrus system and sliding into a smooth Tokyo drift.

Comment: They should be adding buttons, not removing them. (Score 1) 329 329

This really seems like Apple is taking a step backwards to me. While the closed system of the iDevices does provide a relatively bug free experience, there are bugs. And when it doubt, home button. I used to an iPhone user and loved it when I had it, then I switched to Android, which I really love. Recently I got an iPad for work and it has really surprised me how cumbersome it is to use by comparison, largely due to the lack of permanent buttons like Home and Back. I really can't imagine how much more cumbersome it will be to use once the home button is gone. By the way, what's the deal with tech companies starting out as innovative and ending up with their head in their asses? Steve, are you worried that you missed something up there the last go around in the late 90s?

Comment: Re:Thank God! (Score 1) 309 309

I'm sure there aren't any other applications of the technology being used here. Completely useless doing research unless it cures cancer. What a bunch of... Trolls? Let's shut down Google and enter in that Cancer Cure equation. About time that thing got solved. I just love how computers can solve everything on their own. Makes me feel so obsolete.

We have a equal opportunity Calculus class -- it's fully integrated.

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