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Comment: Re:Not a good week... (Score 5, Interesting) 445

by Motard (#48283071) Attached to: Virgin Galactic SpaceShipTwo Crashes

The benefits of every technical achievement went to the rich people first. From the toilet, to electric lighting, the automobile, the iPhone, etc. Every one.

Even military advances. Thanks God that it turned out, starting in the 1600-1700s that private enterprise - working independently of the aristocracies - led to wealth generation outside of the political structure. This gave societies as a whole the power to increasingly influence governments, leading to popular revolutions in America and France, and the neutering of royal power in England.

Comment: Re:And so therefor it follows and I quote (Score 1) 353

by Motard (#48230967) Attached to: Italian Supreme Court Bans the 'Microsoft Tax'

Walk into a store and buy a fully assembled name brand (Dell, HP, etc) PC, complete with warranty and guarantees, without ANY software preinstalled. You can't. Your analogy fails.

If enough people wanted to do that, you could. But virtually nobody does. The demand is not there. The Italian legal system thinks too highly of itself.

Comment: Re:Pipe Dreams (Score 1) 203

by Motard (#48083681) Attached to: A Production-Ready Flying Car Is Coming This Month

If this thing can drive on roads in Slovakia, that's plenty good enough for me at this point. After all, even if I had the money, pilot skills and desire for such a thing, I certainly wouldn't be the market for the first version.

I'd just like to see someone, somewhere give it a go. And on the surface, the claimed specs of this thing would be adequate to be potentially useful - presuming it's not all bullshit.

That's what I want to know at this point. Do the range and speed numbers even pass a cursory BS test?

It was kinda like stuffing the wrong card in a computer, when you're stickin' those artificial stimulants in your arm. -- Dion, noted computer scientist

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