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Comment: Cyber Monday? (Score 3, Informative) 120

by Morris Thorpe (#45391263) Attached to: China's "Singles Day" Is the World's Biggest Online Shopping Blitz

Interesting to see the term used here of all places.

Remember when that term was rolled out in 2005 and we laughed? It was a bad marketing term (I mean cyber-anything went out in the 90's) for an obviously-concocted day. The Monday after Thanksgiving was not the busiest online shopping day of the year at the time. http://slashdot.org/story/05/11/29/135240/cyber-monday-doesnt-exist

And here we are, a few years later....

Comment: You can use a workaround (for now) (Score 5, Informative) 141

by Morris Thorpe (#42215075) Attached to: Google Axes Free Google Apps For Businesses

I was able to register for a single-user free account this morning by doing this.

http://www.labnol.org/internet/google-apps-free/26926/

How to Get the Free Edition of Google Apps

Alternatively, here’s a quick and simple workaround that will still let you sign-up for the free edition of Google Apps even though Google has officially retired the free edition – all you need is a free Gmail or Google account.

        Go to appengine.google.com, sign-in with your Google Account and create a new Application. You may fill in any dummy date and click the “Create Application” button.
        Open the “Dashboard” and on the next screen, click the link that says “Application Settings.”
        Scroll down a little (refer to the video tutorial) and choose “Add Domain” to associate a domain with your App Engine application.
        That’s it. Now you should see a special link* to sign-up for the free edition of Google Apps. You may either use your existing domain or buy one through Google Apps.

[*] You have to access this link through App Engine as Google Apps checks the HTTP Referrer information before serving up the sign-up page for the free edition of Google Apps.

Comment: A financial decision presented as ethical (Score 3, Insightful) 224

by Morris Thorpe (#40313987) Attached to: Comcast Refusing To Comply With Piracy Subpoenas

If you get bills through the mail (from Comcast included), then you've been urged to "Go Green!" by going paperless. We know they don't give a crap about saving a few trees. They're trying to reduce their costs (paper, stamps, design, etc.) If emailing statements was more expensive, they would not push us in that direction.

I'm guessing Comcast is doing this exclusively for the same reason (saving money) and covering it up with the same moral wrapping paper.

They're sick bastards but, hey, if it puts a stop to this....

Comment: Sad state of affairs (Score 2) 163

This is sickening. No one in their right mind would argue otherwise. When lawyers make the rules (be it through lobbies or becoming lawmakers themselves), they favor their kind.
We're becoming more and more a society in which the do-nothings make out like bandits. That can't last much longer, can it?

Look at the google ads that came up on this page,

Injury Compensation Claim
How Much Is Your Injury Worth? Free Evaluation With An Attorney!
Get Cash From Lawsuit Now
Don't Wait For Settlement-Get Cash Now-If You Don't Win-You Pay Zero!
Medical Malpractice Case
Pain & Suffering from Your Injury? Talk to a Local Attorney for Free.

Comment: Re:The companies aren't in Detroit. (Score 2) 36

by Morris Thorpe (#39024109) Attached to: Venture Capital in Detroit, Among Other Places (Video)

Agree.
I was interested until I saw they describe themselves as all-digital: "We invest in social media, mobile apps, software, cloud computing, e-commerce, digital advertising & media, marketing technology, and general internet businesses."
In other words, we don't want to create anything. I love Detroit but I don't think it will be reborn in this way.

Two of the companies they've funded say they are "disruptive." I'm not up to date on marketing jargon. What does that even mean?

Comment: Just make it clear: is it an ad or not? (Score 5, Informative) 183

by Morris Thorpe (#38988185) Attached to: How Much Stuff Can Timothy Jam Into His New Hoodie's Pockets? (Video)

Why don't you mark this as a paid advertisement? (or if it really isn't, then make it clear because everyone assumes it is.)

Listen, I have no problem with Slashdot making money. But....you HAVE to know that this kind of thing is going to be flamed. So why not make it clear that a post has been paid for? Sure you'll still get some negative feedback, but I bet it'd be a lot less.

If I were Scottevest, I'd be pretty pissed about the conversation.generated by my ad. Hell, if I were them I'd never have advertised in the first place precisely because of that.
You upset your readers because they feel like they're being sold out - and you make the advertiser look bad. Not a good strategy, IMO.

Comment: This goes beyond terror (Score 4, Interesting) 720

by Morris Thorpe (#38905055) Attached to: Do You Like Online Privacy? You May Be a Terrorist

There's a news story in Ann Arbor in which a pediatrician is accused of peeping involving a minor. Police confiscated his computer based on the investigation. That's great and I'm glad they caught the guy.

But....after analyzing his computer, the cops presented the "evidence" they found.
The detective was (can't find the news story right now, sorry) quoted as listing images, an electronic receipt to a child porn site and....the fact that the doctor deleted cookies and added other privacy measures to his browsing! The quote assumed that he must have been up to no good if he was careful about his privacy.

More telling. Out of the 200-plus comments on the story, none referenced this.

Science

+ - What Makes Spider Webs Tough as Steel->

Submitted by sciencehabit
sciencehabit (1205606) writes "A new analysis reveals the intricacies of spider web design, showing how the unique properties of its silk turn webs into flexible yet strong traps. Compuer simulations reveal that heavy forces spread over the entire net rather than stay local. Real spidersilk can be either stretchy or stiff at different times, which produces threads that flex and then snap in just the right way to avoid wrecking nearby spokes."
Link to Original Source

Comment: In-store exchange: taken away and given back? (Score 1) 214

by Morris Thorpe (#36876018) Attached to: Blockbuster Trying To Woo Disgruntled Netflix Customers

FTFA
>>Both plans come with a 30-day free trial and include "unlimited in-store exchanges of by-mail rentals."

So the in-store exchange is back?
Bastards! I used to be a fairly happy Blockbuster customer until they cancelled in-store exchange. I moved to Netflix and, evidently, I was not alone. At the time, Blockbuster said stores were losing money because of this.
So why did they bring the plan back? Seems to me they tried to see just how much they could get out of their customers and miscalculated. Badly.

Of course, it's not the first time Blockbuster has made a dumb mistake. Remember the "No Late Fees" fiasco?

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