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Comment Pre-Pay the Fines (Score 1) 93

I think the banks should pre-pay the eventual millions/billions of dollars they will eventually be fined for whatever nefarious purpose this will be used for. They can write it off their books early, we can avoid lengthy trials and endless bloviating about how "something must be done to rein in the financial system", and we can all just admit that it's going to happen anyway so why not get ahead of the curve?

Comment Can Good Come From This? (Score 1) 396

Is it really likely that something good and beautiful can be created by people working under this kind of regime? A cheaper role of toilet paper that gets to your house really that what some of our smartest people want to devote their lives to? Increasingly we let technology companies drive culture, and I can't help but think that nothing truly beautiful and valuable will come out of people working in conditions like this. It is a lie we tell ourselves as we look at attractive devices and use amazing the case of Amazon and companies like it, these things are born of bad soil. Beyond just not wanting to buy anything through Amazon, I don't want this kind of company in my city (Seattle).

Comment Re:Advertising opportunities (Score 1) 261

Community Voice Mail, the nonprofit I work for, offers free voice mail boxes to more than 40,000 homeless and other "phoneless" people in 39 U.S. cities. We usually only provide the service to people who are seeking assistance from a social service agency; we buy local phone numbers in all these cities, and distribute them through a network of 2,500+ of these agencies. What we've found in 10+ years of doing this is that having a reliable phone number to put on job or housing application is still very important and can help determine whether a person gets their life back on track or not.

A lot of homeless people are using cell phones, mostly likely buying "pay-as-you-go" minutes. Those that find a way to sign up for annual plan without a reliable home address sometimes have problems paying the bills, and this can impact their credit record (which can impact applications for low-income housing, etc.). The cheap plans don't always include voice mail. And then there is the issue of having a reliable place to recharge your phone.

Ditto for email and the Web. There are obviously a lot of free access points, and a lot of information on the Web that can help people help themselves. If every homeless person had an email account, it would make it quite a bit easier to provide them with services (e.g. a broadcast message each week about job/housing opportunities in a particular city). As it is, we do this with voice mail, and it works reasonably well.

We're conducting focus groups and survey research on both topics this summer, with voice mail users in about five cities. Happy to post a follow-up about this when we have our data. (I'll leave the discussion about why and how people are homeless to those with more knowledge than I. I spend all my time trying to give people this voice mail tool so they can become ex-homeless!).

It is your destiny. - Darth Vader