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Comment: Re:Windows !!! (Score 1) 86

by hairyfeet (#49556793) Attached to: Buggy Win 95 Code Almost Wrecked Stuxnet Campaign

How many vulnerabilities is there in Ubuntu 6? Debian Sid? Windows XP is FIFTEEN YEARS OLD and was designed to run on a Pentium II 400MHz with 128MB of RAM. If they are too damned cheap to upgrade or replace a PC that is a decade plus old why should that be MSFT's problem? Apple doesn't support the G3s and G4s either but you don't see anybody trying to claim that as any "proof" of anything.

As for your other point its nothing but moving the goalposts and therefor meaningless, because we both know if the numbers were reversed the FOSSies wouldn't be arguing about what "level" the vulnerability is, which just FYI means exactly jack and shit as we have seen with tricks like the "WTF" virus you can use a low level vulnerability (in that case unprivileged user ID spoofing allowing the attacker to send a message) to then effect a higher level attack (user thinks message is legit, clicks on link provided which takes user to a page filled with zero day attacks) so the idea of "levels" really doesn't mean shit anymore.

Comment: Re:A first step (Score 1) 273

by mrchaotica (#49550687) Attached to: Tesla To Announce Battery-Based Energy Storage For Homes

We use electric heating--which is expensive, and while our neighborhood will be getting natural gas in the next few months, it makes no economic sense for us to replace our central heating system with gas. (The payoff exceeds the lifespan of the HVAC already installed.)

Resistive heating or a heat pump? If the former, I suspect that replacing your AC with a heat pump would save you a lot of money. I would even go so far to say that if your HVAC is old then it would make sense to upgrade (because you'd have to replace the AC eventually anyway, and the marginal cost is small), and if your HVAC is new then whoever had it replaced last time was an idiot for not upgrading to a heat pump then.

Comment: Re:This never works (Score 3, Insightful) 284

by hairyfeet (#49548885) Attached to: Microsoft, Chip Makers Working On Hardware DRM For Windows 10 PCs

What he is talking about is DIVX (all caps), named to make people think of the OTHER DivX , which was an attempt at "DRM in a box" that went over about as well as a loud ripping fart in an elevator.

I predict other than the *philes (the same folks that bought Beta, Laserdisc, and anything else that claimed to be "better" than the rest) 4K is gonna flop as bad as 3D TV, the reasons why are numerous, 1.- DVD is "good enough" for the majority, which is why after all these years BD is still not a blip compared to the massive DVD install base, 2.- The bandwidth in the USA to stream 4K without getting capped? EXTREMELY rare, most folks would be lucky to be able to watch 2 vids before they get capped, 3.- The not insignificant investment from users that really like what 1080p looks like now, and 4.- The fact it won't work with anything they already have, thus causing the "I gotta buy the Beatles albums again" syndrome which in a "jobless recovery" isn't gonna fly.

Considering the majority of PCs still don't come with BD? I'm really not worried about 4K DRM, it'll be another WMA, only bitch is the wasted die space used by your GPU and/or board for this shit you'll never use. Damn, now I'm gonna have to grab that R9 270x before they have time to add that shit.

Comment: Re:Instead... (Score 1) 355

I'm not actually experiencing what you're saying. Where I've seen sites use Bootstrap, or use one of the new Wordpress themes etc, they've actually been pretty usable on a mobile device.

The real problems are getting to be the non-WWW stuff people forget about, like responsive HTML emails.

Comment: Re: SystemD added? (Score 3, Insightful) 459

by hairyfeet (#49547115) Attached to: Ubuntu 15.04 Released, First Version To Feature systemd

Uhhhh...yeah dude? The post he is referring to used "compartmentalized", "intrinsic" and "homogeneous" in less than 3 sentences....normal folks and IT guys? yeah they don't talk like that. So the poster is either 1.- A shill, or 2.- Works in PR or marketing, because those guys DO talk like that.

Frankly I was shocked he didn't roll out "synergy" but I think they wised onto it thanks to Dilbert ragging on it so many times.

Comment: Re:systemd is a bad joke (Score 1) 459

by squiggleslash (#49547063) Attached to: Ubuntu 15.04 Released, First Version To Feature systemd

Ask Linux Torvalds what he thought of what people in operating system design (namely, Andrew Tanenbaum, who famously called Linux "obsolete") thought.

I think Linus (not Linux) Torvalds is actually an operating system designer. He's also one of many who disagrees with Tanenbaum. Neither of which has anything to do with anything at this point, he's not the one designing the whole of Ubuntu or Fedora, his work is on a small part of it that doesn't handle the userland start up process.

The people who are designing Ubuntu, Fedora, etc, are saying init, both in its bad System V version, and in its "Scales for everything you need a 386 to do" BSD variant, is not up to the job in a world that has USB, Bluetooth, e-SATA, et al, in it. I think they're right, personally. And to be honest, I think they've been right since the early 1990s, when Internet service protocols were kinda grafted on, moved to inetd, augmented by Sun RPC services, NFS, blah, etc, and the phenomenon of a Unix system that wouldn't boot up due to anything other than hardware failure or disk corruption suddenly became very real and very common.

"We" haven't done much about it since then largely due to a combination of inertia and the fact an average Unix admin was skilled in shell scripting. The latter hasn't been true, however, for a good ten years, which is why Apple has LaunchD, and why Ubuntu also threw out init in favor of modern alternatives, initially Upstart, and now SystemD.

Comment: Re:So, where's IBM in all of this? (Score 1) 76

by squiggleslash (#49546993) Attached to: Amazon's Profits Are Floating On a Cloud (Computing)

No idea, but just because you don't see their name on the product doesn't mean it's not their's. In the past they've been very big on data centers, leasing the equipment and supporting it. You wouldn't know that just because Amazon's name is on the product, any more than you would know IBM's hardware powered Ford's data centers when you bought your Ford Escort.

Comment: Re:It is a cycle. (Score 1) 76

by squiggleslash (#49546877) Attached to: Amazon's Profits Are Floating On a Cloud (Computing)

I'm not seeing that. There was a gradual move to decentralization that peaked in the late eighties/early nineties, but then it's been gradual centralization, partially due to ubiquitous office networking (early nineties), and then due to ubiquitous Internet connectivity (mid nineties on.)

There may have been slight ripples during that time that affected the acceleration of the curve, but the broad curve itself was never interrupted.

My history would show:

1950s-1970s: Era of the highly centralized mainframe, with minis used in occasional scientific applications.
1970s-1980s: Increasing use of minicomputers, plus rise of the micro, some of which made their way into businesses. It's slightly less centralized but users are still sharing common computer resources.
1980s-late 1980s: Rise of the home/micro and PC, almost all applications local save for occasional use of Terminal emulators to access "legacy" applications on a central mainframe or minicomputer. Most new development is of decentralized, disconnected, tools.
Late 1980s-1995: Rise of the network. Client-server application development starts to take off. Development in business starts to be for partially distributed, but partially centralized, applications.
1995-2005: Rise of the Internet and associated standards. Businesses start to move all their core applications to the web, leaving a handful of Office type apps as the sole remaining decentralized stuff.
2005+: Rise of the cloud. Driven by a combination of mature web standards, the explosion of interest in non-PC devices, the increasing use and popularization of hosting services, and businesses that run data centers finding they're both hellishly expensive (yet unavoidable) and inevitably end up with huge amounts of unused capacity, there's a huge movement to move core business applications to services like AWS.

If there's a move against the grain (either towards centralization before the late 1980s, or away from centralization after 1995) I missed it.

Don't be fooled, if you have been, by the occasional post-1994 move towards more client devices, frequently out of control of IT (such as the BYOD movement), those initiatives only work because the core business applications are centralized and accessible using standard clients.

Comment: Re:Instead... (Score 1) 355

Every other new site I see developed these days tends to be written using Bootstrap. Older sites have the entirely reasonable excuse that overhauling an existing design takes time. But I'm seeing older sites switch over to newer technologies. Newer default Wordpress themes are also generally responsive by default, and I assume the same is true of other CMS systems.

Bootstrap isn't perfect but it's pretty good at making it easy to set up a professional looking website that happens to be responsive too.

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