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Comment: Re:Its Fine. (Score 1) 267

.history shows you everything a user types as soon as they type it

What shell are your users using? That's not what I see at all.

Sounds like Korn shell. You probably see Bourne-again shell writing to ${HISTFILE} when it exits, but ksh will continually update .sh_history as commands are entered. This can get a bit awkward if you are using a shared account with more than one person logged on at once.

Comment: Re:Yeah, "disruptive" (Score 3, Funny) 165

by Minwee (#47534303) Attached to: Wikipedia Blocks 'Disruptive' Edits From US Congress

The biography of former U.S. defense secretary Donald Rumsfeld was edited to say that he was an "alien lizard who eats Mexican babies."

Why won't Donald Rumsfeld deny these allegations? We're not saying he is an alien lizard who eats Mexican babies -- In fact, we think he isn't! But I can't help but wonder, since he has failed to deny these horrible allegations, why won't he deny that he is an alien lizard who eats Mexican babies?

Hey, I'm just asking questions.

Comment: Re:Biden is talking coding?? (Score 4, Interesting) 224

by Minwee (#47520943) Attached to: VP Biden Briefs US Governors On H-1B Visas, IT, and Coding

Al Gore, March 8, 1999, interview with CNN’s Wolf Blitzer, "I took the initiative in creating the Internet."

Al Gore, March 8, 1999, about 0.2 seconds later in the same interview "...I took the initiative in moving forward a whole range of initiatives that have proven to be important to our country’s economic growth, environmental protection, improvements in our educational system." Wired magazine yanked that quote out of context and it has never been the same since.

You may want to look up the "High Performance Computing Act of 1991", also known as the "Gore Bill". That's the one which, among other things, funded the National Center for Supercomputing Applications, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and the National Science Foundation, without which we wouldn't have all of the nice toys we enjoy today.

Don't take my word for it. Why not ask Vint Cerf and Bob Kahn, the computer science gurus who did get the Internet up and running? While they had been working on it for some time, the RFCs describing TCP and IP weren't published until 1981, and the "Flag Day" on which the old ARPANET switched to running on Internet Protocol was in 1983.

The internet was up and running before he ever got elected to any office

Al Gore was first elected to the US House of Representatives in 1976 and was pushing the ideas of high speed telecommunications in his first term. Unless you are counting the 57 computers on ARPANET at that time as "The Internet" it looks like you may want to revise that statement.

He kept the tax money flowing to the right rich people and the kept the campaign contributions flowing right back.

That's what tax money does. Taxes pay for things like civilized society, or in this case The Internet. And Al Gore was the guy who paid the bills for the people who created the Internet. He also paid the bills for the initial development of Internet Explorer and letting AOL users onto Usenet, so he does have a lot to make up for, but when he said that he was the man behind much of the US government's support of computing and telecommunication research which led to the modern Internet, he was right.

Comment: Re:Social problem, social solution (Score 1) 98

by Minwee (#47515649) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Linux Login and Resource Management In a Computer Lab?

If they have a good excuse for abusing the systems then discuss it with them, suggest alternatives to running rendering jobs on the lab servers and keeping passwords on sticky notes or whatever else it is that they are doing wrong and then restore their access, trusting that they will know better.

Everybody runs a fork bomb once in their life. A computer lab should be a safe place to make mistakes, not somewhere that any mistakes will make you a pariah.

It's good that we agree on that.

Comment: Social problem, social solution (Score 2) 98

by Minwee (#47510069) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Linux Login and Resource Management In a Computer Lab?

Post a short, general list of rules in several obvious places. Make them reasonable enough to cover most possible user needs but flexible enough to cover things that you haven't thought of yet. Any user who is stupid enough to break the rules by running fork bombs, torrents, mining, hiding stashes of lemur porn or anything else which a child of six could tell you was a bad idea, will have their accounts disabled as soon as they are discovered.

If they have a good excuse for abusing the systems then discuss it with them, suggest alternatives to running rendering jobs on the lab servers and keeping passwords on sticky notes or whatever else it is that they are doing wrong and then restore their access, trusting that they will know better. If you do it right, they may even decide that it is better to ask for permission than forgiveness next time.

If they don't, send a memo to their department head briefly outlining what they did, how it was detected, what action you have taken, and that you won't be reversing this decision until you see a presidential pardon come down from an appropriately high authority. It doesn't matter if they have Really Important Work which needs to be done by the end of the week or not, just cut them off until the proper User Apology and Restoration procedure has been completed.

There you go. This solution is licensed under the WTFPL which is compatible with the Open Source Definition and the Debian Free Software Guidelines so you can use it any way you want. You can even supply your own LART and display it prominently by the door of your office if that helps get the message across.

Put not your trust in money, but put your money in trust.

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