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Comment: Nothing new (Score 1) 712

Those kiosks have already been available in Canada at some Tim Hortons branches for years now. At least four or five years ago I used one to order my lunch in advance at a very busy downtown branch of the coffee chain in Toronto and it printed me a receipt, my number was called and I received my order before some people waiting in line.

Comment: Re:And this is why Linux will never win the deskto (Score 1) 555

by MikeBabcock (#48194997) Attached to: Debian's Systemd Adoption Inspires Threat of Fork

Compile any Linux binary as static and it will include everything it needs to run -- although 64-bit binaries won't load on a 32-bit system of course.

In fact just the other day I was on an older system and I couldn't find iperf in its distro so I downloaded the pre-compiled 32-bit binary to do some quick bandwidth testing.

As a company that deals with industrial customers, we have dealt with plenty of Windows software that will not run on anything newer than XP, or sometimes 7, or 98 or 3.1 before those.

The Windows API is not a static target.

Comment: Re:And this is why Linux will never win the deskto (Score 1) 555

by MikeBabcock (#48188909) Attached to: Debian's Systemd Adoption Inspires Threat of Fork

Wait, there's only one Windows? I could've sworn there were at least a half dozen active versions out there with features that aren't all inter-compatible ... just like Linux. They don't even look alike, and it causes fragmentation.

Why is Windows on the desktop? Applications and vendor support (bribed or otherwise) which boils down to "because it has been around longer."

The difference with Linux is you get a choice, and you get to argue, and it makes a difference. There are far more on-line posts about people who do or don't like Windows 8's interface than about systemd, but that isn't the cause of Window's sudden failure on the desktop now is it?

Comment: Re:min install (Score 1) 221

by MikeBabcock (#48007087) Attached to: Outlining Thin Linux

Aside from someone else already pointing out that you want to use different tools, that's exactly my point -- their minimal install is truly minimal -- there's no need to roll your own at all.

My basic install procedure is a CentOS minimal with a quick shell script that installs the packages and configs I need on top of that on a per-client basis.

Comment: Re:min install (Score 1) 221

by MikeBabcock (#48007079) Attached to: Outlining Thin Linux

If you're putting together your own optimized small footprint installs, you're not a sysadmin anymore, you're a distro maker. I spend way too much time actually administering working machines to be bothered to do someone else's job as well.

CentOS does a fantastic job of maintaining their minimal install for me (and anyone else who wishes to use it), what possible advantage is there to me putting together something else (not to mention learning a new filesystem and config layout for no reason).

Facts are stubborn, but statistics are more pliable.

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