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Comment: Re:Jerri (Score 5, Insightful) 532

this is on Obama's watch and he has been totally negligent.

Because we are TEAM AMERICA: WORLD POLICE!

Its because hes a coward and would rather let the menace rage out of control than take it on.

Indeed, instead of containing them we should just go in guns blazing, because that's always the best way to counter problematic ideologies. It always works out so well. It's also easy for the armchair general to send soldiers to die for whatever cause they deem worthy.

Comment: Re:How is a HDD firmware written? (Score 1) 323

by Microlith (#49159721) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: How Does One Verify Hard Drive Firmware?

There is even a specific firmware update command in the ATA spec, but many vendors use their own just because.

Not "just because," but because the standard Download Microcode command is PIO and happens completely synchronously. This can cause Windows to BSOD if it happens to hit a page fault during the update.

Vendors typically implement an NCQ, DMA-capable process that is asynchronous so you can update from within the OS without issue.

Comment: Re:how ? (Score 1) 323

by Microlith (#49159655) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: How Does One Verify Hard Drive Firmware?

Many hard drives have a secondary TTL level serial port that you can use to load new firmware on a bricked drive.

That depends on how the vendor utilized the serial port and how they do their boot sequence. If it's anything above baseline chip support, you might not be able to do anything useful with it.

Comment: Re:Lawyers rejoice!! (Score 5, Insightful) 114

by Microlith (#49113829) Attached to: Lenovo Hit With Lawsuit Over Superfish Adware

Home customers get to see different ads on their screen besides Google's own Adsense garbage. BFD!

Yeah it's a BFD, Lenovo took money to install an application that deliberately reduced end user security for the sake of inserting ads into their browsing activities! Not only is it completely bereft of ethics and respect for their customers, it's actively dangerous.

They shouldn't just be hit via a class action suit (assuming Lenovo isn't sticking a "binding arbitration" clause to defeat the ability for consumers to seek recourse) but Federal prosecution under one of the many computer security laws that would string up anyone else.

Comment: Re:You are more Free than they let on (Score 1) 201

by Microlith (#49083823) Attached to: After 30 Years of the Free Software Foundation, Where Do We Stand?

Tablets are still a grey area and you can't point to a single person who had action taken against them... if anything were tried at this point they would fall undertake same ruling.

Due to the way the DMCA is written, jailbreaking is presumed illegal unless the LoC gives an exemption. An exemption was explicitly requested for tablets and was denied via tortured logic. Consoles were covered too. Phones were retained, but cellphone unlocking was covered under the tortured legalese as well, and made illegal (thus the Congressional rush to make it legal.)

anyone jailbreaking is probably downloading torrents already, so why does legality matter again?

Because it shouldn't be a federal crime to use your device as you see fit, regardless of whether they'll actually prosecute. This notion that people using their devices freely is somehow inherently associated with criminality is part of a shitty, insulting mindset.

Metaphorically speaking that is always true of a device you have physical control of.

Yes, metaphorically speaking. Practically speaking, they're making a pretty direct statement that you are not in control, they are.

The state in many cases says choices should not be made by those not capable of making them.

Holy shit, when they do this it's due to mental impairment, not lack of education!

Similarly I am fine with device makers adding enough security so someone skilled enough to deal with the repercussions of removing them can do whatever they like, which is the world we live in today.

Except this isn't similar! The device vendor arbitrarily declares themselves the authority and fight against you to enforce it. And no amount of competency or education will convince them to give you control - they have reserved it for themselves.

Comment: Re:When you don't know what you are doing (Score 1) 201

by Microlith (#49083791) Attached to: After 30 Years of the Free Software Foundation, Where Do We Stand?

Car makers in no way support custom ECUs in the same way phone makers do not support jailbreaking or rooting.

Car vendors don't weld the hood shut or put other things into the engine to prevent you from making that modification.

It's pretty equivalent to jailbreaking that you have the literal keys because you have physical control of the device.

Jailbreaking would be akin to having to saw open the hood or find a way to trick the vendor-controlled hood lock to unlatch and let you in. And Ford/GM would be petitioning the Library of Congress to disallow a DMCA exemption.

Comment: Re:When you don't know what you are doing (Score 1) 201

by Microlith (#49083653) Attached to: After 30 Years of the Free Software Foundation, Where Do We Stand?

A better one would be doing something like altering an ECU in a car and then changing parameters without understanding what you are doing, and blowing an engine...

And yet there are 3rd party kits to modify the ECUs (or outright replace) of a lot of vehicles.

Of course, doing that would void your warranty if they could show the modified ECU caused the failure, which I am entirely OK with. Vendors should put the keys in your hand, but if you turn that lock you take your fate in your own hands.

Comment: Re:You are more Free than they let on (Score 1) 201

by Microlith (#49083597) Attached to: After 30 Years of the Free Software Foundation, Where Do We Stand?

But you ARE legally able to Free any device. Jailbreaking was explicitly declared legal to do, and indeed plenty of people do so.

Except on tablets, where it's still illegal. And Apple will be right behind you to close that hole and petition the Library of Congress to make jailbreaking of your handset illegal.

But you ARE legally able to Free any device. Jailbreaking was explicitly declared legal to do, and indeed plenty of people do so.

Devices do not need to be inherently insecure, they should be secure by default. But said security needs to put the keys in the hands of the user, which so few modern devices do. So if you turn off the security or break it, you can't effectively re-secure it on your terms.

just don't see where it's realistic or even a good idea to hold every product to that standard.

Is it realistic to hold every device to a standard that, if they're online, they're secure? Then it should also be reasonable for the user to be able to make decisions about that security, even if that decision is "leave it as-is."

Comment: Re:fvwm is what I use, anyway (Score 1) 755

by Microlith (#49064723) Attached to: Removing Libsystemd0 From a Live-running Debian System

dislike all the procs running

Oh no, there are processes running!

mem wasted

Exactly how is it wasted?

I always laugh when people look at my display. I use a red/orange color to highlight the active window and grey for the inactive ones. there is no trash icon, no iconbox, no drag/drop. a short menu appears when you click into space (no clients under) and then pick which foreground rxvt opens up (all with black bg's).

So basically, you'd be happy with a modern-day amber phosphor display?

I've been using this layout for literally over 25 yrs (starting with twm and using mwm for a short while, when motif was still popular).

Ah, so you're getting old and resistant to change, particularly when it's change that doesn't suit you.

we should NOT have to flip over backwards to remove a stupid should-not-be-there-anyway daemon and its evil libs.

So don't use the systems that do use those EBIL DEBIL'S LIBS. Go fund the development of a platform that conforms to your wishes. Don't bitch when others move on and do different things.

Comment: Re:Pointless (Score 2) 755

by Microlith (#49064709) Attached to: Removing Libsystemd0 From a Live-running Debian System

No they aren't.

Rather, the anti-systemd crowd is making up stories about the advocates, slinging vitriol and hatred, and engaging in pretty much any sort of abuse they can engage in towards the systemd developers.

I have seen few rational, logical, unemotional criticisms of systemd and lots and logs of reactionary bullshit.

Comment: Re:Pointless (Score 1) 755

by Microlith (#49064687) Attached to: Removing Libsystemd0 From a Live-running Debian System

start by getting rid of Stallman

What would this accomplish, other than be a silly attempt at silencing someone you don't like?

write some damned drivers

Go tell the hardware vendors to do that.

make an easy to use system that doesn't require 5 hours of Googling on how to get a laptop soundcard to work.

Funny, I haven't had issues with sound in ages. Perhaps you haven't used Linux in the past 10 years?

Comment: Re:Choice is good. (Score 1) 755

by Microlith (#49064675) Attached to: Removing Libsystemd0 From a Live-running Debian System

that's precisely why i actually worked hard and risked destroying my business by losing access to all data on a critical business laptop

No offense, but while I've watched many of your projects with interest, if you "risked destroying [your] business because of losing access to data on a single laptop, you just might deserve to go out of business due to sheer stupidity. Both in lack of redundancy and doing whatever it was you were doing on what is effectively a "production" system.

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