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Submission + - Google brings the Dead Sea scrolls to the digital age ( 5

skade88 writes: Google has been working to bring many old manuscripts to the internet in high resolutions for all to see.

From the Google Press Release:
'A little over a year ago, we helped put online five manuscripts of the Dead Sea Scrolls—ancient documents that include the oldest known biblical manuscripts in existence. Written more than 2,000 years ago on pieces of parchment and papyrus, they were preserved by the hot, dry desert climate and the darkness of the caves in which they were hidden. The Scrolls are possibly the most important archaeological discovery of the 20th century.

Today, we’re helping put more of these ancient treasures online. The Israel Antiquities Authority is launching the Leon Levy Dead Sea Scrolls Digital Library, an online collection of some 5,000 images of scroll fragments, at a quality never seen before. The texts include one of the earliest known copies of the Book of Deuteronomy, which includes the Ten Commandments; part of Chapter 1 of the Book of Genesis, which describes the creation of the world; and hundreds more 2,000-year-old texts, shedding light on the time when Jesus lived and preached, and on the history of Judaism.'


Submission + - Spider that Builds It's Own Spider Decoys Discovered (

OakDragon writes: "A newly discovered species of spider — apparently of the genus Cyclosa — has been discovered in the Peruvian Amazon. The spider builds an elaborate decoy out of web, twigs, and other scraps, that appears to be a much larger spider. The spider will even cause the decoy to move, marionette-style, by shaking the web."

Submission + - Alan Alda Challenges Scientists to Explain: What Is Time? (

sciencehabit writes: What is time? And how would you explain it to an 11-year-old? That's the question actor Alan Alda has posed to scientists in the second Flame Challenge—so named because the question in last year's competition was, "What is a flame?" The challenge aims to spur scientists to think about how they can better communicate with the public. Scientists have until 1 March to submit their answers, which will be judged by 11-year-olds around the world. Organizers will announce the winner at the World Science Festival in New York City on 1 June.

Submission + - The CTO of the CIA speaks about his top tech priorities (

mattydread23 writes: "In a rare public appearance yesterday, Gus Hunt, the chief technology officer of the CIA, spoke about some of the top challenges he faces running tech in the ultimate lockdown environment. Among the revelations: 99.9% of the devices supported are wireline PCs as wireless simply isn't secure enough. He also talked about how CIA analysts can combine "applets" into applications then re-upload them to a central repository for others to use."

Submission + - Multiple Joomla Sites Serving Malware (

hypnosec writes: Reports are flowing in that a number of Joomla sites are involved in distribution of malware through the use of an exploit kit known to deploy fake AV software. According to Internet Storm Center, Joomla and WordPress sites are targeted and malicious iFrames are being hosted. Servers hosting such sites are not being targeted through any specific vulnerability but, some kind of tool is being used to fire a bunch of exploits with a hope that something hits the bull’s-eye. The URLs ending with /nighttrend.cgi?8 have been known to serve such malware. A couple of IP addresses and have been also identified as culprits as of now.

Submission + - Google's Second Brain: How the Knowledge Graph Changes Search (

waderoush writes: "Last spring Google introduced its English-speaking users to the Knowledge Graph, a vast semantic graph of real-world entities and properties born from the Freebase project at Metaweb Technologies (which Google acquired in 2010). This month Google began showing Knowledge Graph results to speakers of seven other languages. Though the project has received little coverage, the consequences could be as far-reaching as previous overhauls to Google’s infrastructure, such as the introduction of universal search back in 2007. That’s because the Knowledge Graph plugs a big hole in Google’s technology: the lack of a common-sense understanding of the things in its Web index. Despite all the statistical magic that made Google’s keyword-based retrieval techniques so effective, ‘We didn’t ever represent the real world properly in the computer,’ says Google senior vice president of engineering Amit Singhal. He says the Knowledge Graph represents a ‘baby step’ toward future computer systems that can intuit what humans are searching for and respond with exact answers, rather than the classic ten blue links. ‘Now, when you encounter encounters the letters T-A-J-M-A-H-A-L on any Web page, the computers suddenly start understanding that this document is about the monument, and this one is about the musician, and this one is about a restaurant,’ Singhal says. ‘That ‘aboutness’ is foundational to building the search of tomorrow.’"

Submission + - Intel unveils 22nm SoC transistors, while TSMC and GloFo plan risky process jump (

MrSeb writes: "Transistor announcements aren’t the sexiest occasions on the block, but Intel’s 22nm SoC unveil is important for a host of reasons. As process nodes shrink and more components move on-die, the characteristics of each new node have become particularly important. 22nm isn’t a new node for Intel; it debuted the technology last year with Ivy Bridge, but SoCs are more complex than CPU designs and create their own set of challenges. Like its 22nm Ivy Bridge CPUs, the upcoming 22nm SoCs rely on Intel’s Tri-Gate implementation of FinFET technology. According to Intel engineer Mark Bohr, the 3D transistor structure is the principle reason why the company’s 22nm technology is as strong as it is. Other evidence backs up this point. Earlier this year, we brought you news that Nvidia was deeply concerned about manufacturing economics and the relative strength of TSMC’s sub-28nm planar roadmap. Morris Chang, TSMC’s CEO, has since admitted that such concerns are valid, given that performance and power are only expected to increase by 20-25% as compared to 28nm. The challenge for both TSMC and GlobalFoundries is going to be how to match the performance of Intel’s 22nm technology with their own 28nm products. 20nm looks like it won’t be able to do so, which is why both companies are emphasizing their plans to move to 16nm/14nm ahead of schedule. There’s some variation on which node comes next; both GlobalFoundries and Intel are talking up 14nm; TSMC is implying a quick jump to 16nm. Will it work? Unknown. TSMC and GlobalFoundries both have excellent engineers, but FinFET is a difficult technology to deploy. Ramping it up more quickly than expected while simultaneously bringing up a new process may be more difficult than either company anticipates."

Submission + - How NASA uses GPUs to build vivid flight simulators (

skade88 writes: NASA has used flight simulators for years to train pilots. While most pilots starting their careers have 20/13 vision, most flight sims have output suited for people with 20/40 vision. A team at the NASA Ames research center has designed a new flight sim that is suited for 20/10 vision. This new Human Eye Limited display features 9 projectors (4096×2160) providing a resolution of 36 times that of normal HD TVs. It is a pretty amazing setup, I can't wait to get one at home. I think I have my old F-17A flight sim game from Microprose and my old 486 to run it on. those Pixels will be so high-def it will be crazy! :D

Submission + - LuminAR Bulb Transforms Any Surface Into a Touch Screen (

Zothecula writes: We've all seen gigantic touch screens on the news or in movies, but what if you could achieve the same type of interface by simply replacing the bulb in your desk lamp? That's the idea behind the LuminAR, developed by a team led by Natan Linder at the MIT Media Lab's Fluid Interfaces Group. It combines a Pico-projector, camera, and wireless computer to project interactive images onto any surface – and is small enough to screw into a standard light fixture.

Submission + - That was fast, Leahy scuttles his warrantless e-mail surveillance bill (

Presto Vivace writes: "Under the right conditions, online activism can be very effective. Leahy scuttles his warrantless e-mail surveillance bill

Sen. Patrick Leahy has abandoned his controversial proposal that would grant government agencies more surveillance power — including warrantless access to Americans' e-mail accounts — than they possess under current law.



Submission + - IBM to kill the Lotus brand (

harrymcc writes: "In the pre-Microsoft Office era, Lotus was the biggest name in productivity software — mostly for the 1-2-3 spreadsheet, but also for a bevy of other applications, including innovative stuff such as Magellan. IBM bought out Lotus in 1995, but has kept the brand alive, mostly on its Notes and Domino workgroup products. But now Big Blue says it'll be removing the Lotus name from the next versions. I wasn't even positive that the Lotus branding was still around — but I'm wistful to see it going away, and wrote about it over at"

Submission + - Warrantless Searches: Why Your Digital Privacy Is At Risk In The Senate (

An anonymous reader writes: A new Senate proposal, touted as a measure to protect American's email privacy, was quietly changed to allow the federal government to read your emails without a warrant, according to CNET. The vote on the bill is scheduled for next week. If the vote passes, it could deal a huge blow to your digital privacy.

The bill, sponsored by chairman of the Senate Judiciary committee Patrick Leahy, would allow more than 22 agencies, including the FBI, SEC and FCC, to access the emails, Google Docs, Facebook posts, Twitter messages and more of all Americans — all without a warrant. Even scarier, the FBI and Department of Homeland Security would be able to access all of your internet accounts without notifying the owner of the accounts or a judge.


Submission + - Firefox 17 Launches with Click-to-Play Plugin Blocks

An anonymous reader writes: As expected, Mozilla on Tuesday officially launched Firefox 17 for Windows, Mac, and Linux. The biggest addition in this release is click-to-play plugins, announced back in October. In short, the addition means Mozilla will now prompt Firefox users on Windows with old versions of Adobe Reader, Adobe Flash, and Microsoft Silverlight (more will be added eventually).

Submission + - Static electricity nanogenerator converts friction into battery charging power (

An anonymous reader writes: Researchers at Georgia Tech have been developing an alternative method of harnessing energy from our movement that relies on static electricity and friction. A system has been developed whereby two layers of differing materials can be brought into contact and produce enough energy through friction to power lights or even charge a cell phone battery. One of those layers is made from polyethylene terephthalate plastic. The other is a sheet of metal. Both surfaces have a nanoscale structure printed on them to increase their surface area and therefore the energy generation potential. It is thought a 5cm2 patch could produce enough energy to charge a cell phone battery. And the movement required? Anything from simply breathing through a brisk walk or a session at the gym.

C'est magnifique, mais ce n'est pas l'Informatique. -- Bosquet [on seeing the IBM 4341]