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Submission + - Google's Director of Regime Change (

Memroid writes: 'It has been revealed today, thanks to Edward Snowden, that Google and other US tech companies received millions of dollars from the NSA [...] Documents published last year by WikiLeaks obtained from the US intelligence contractor Stratfor, show that in 2011 Jared Cohen, then (as he is now) Director of Google Ideas, was off running secret missions to the edge of Iran in Azerbaijan. In these internal emails, Fred Burton, Stratfor’s Vice President for Intelligence and a former senior State Department official, describes Google as follows:

"Google is getting WH [White House] and State Dept support and air cover. In reality they are doing things the CIA cannot do... [Cohen] is going to get himself kidnapped or killed. Might be the best thing to happen to expose Google’s covert role in foaming up-risings, to be blunt. The US Gov’t can then disavow knowledge and Google is left holding the shit-bag."'

Submission + - Hackers Can Control Your Car via a Phone Call

Memroid writes: From the 2011 paper titled Comprehensive Experimental Analyses of Automotive Attack Surfaces, "[...] we can compromise the car’s radio and upload custom firmware via a doctored CD, we can compromise the technicians’ PassThru devices and thereby compromise any car subsequently connected to the PassThru device, and we can call our car’s cellular phone number to obtain full control over the car’s telematics unit over an arbitrary distance. Being able to compromise a car’s ECU is, however, only half the story: The remaining concern is what an attacker is able to do with those capabilities. In fact, we show that a car’s externally facing I/O interfaces can be used post-compromise to remotely trigger or control arbitrary vehicular functions at a distance and to exfiltrate data such as vehicle location and cabin audio."

Submission + - Open Source Health Monitoring 3

Memroid writes: What is stopping us from creating technologies for monitoring our health and hacking the human body? What technologies, products, and projects currently exists to detect problems before they become a problem? Blood pressure tracking, blood analysis, vitamin deficiency detection, etc. could save lives — perhaps your own. Can we move these diagnostic tools out of the hands of the health industry and take ownership of our own well-being? Is it feasible to monitor this information from our own home?

Submission + - NVIDIA Developer Zone Hacked

Memroid writes: During the same day that Yahoo announced that their servers were hacked, NVIDIA is now announcing to their Developer Zone members that they too may have been the target of an attack:

"July 12, 2012
Dear DevZone User,

NVIDIA suspended operations today of the NVIDIA Developer Zone website. We did this in response to attacks on the site by unauthorized third parties who may have gained access to hashed passwords.

We are investigating this matter and working around the clock to ensure that secure operations can be restored.

As a precautionary measure, we strongly recommend that you change any identical passwords that you may be using elsewhere.

NVIDIA does not request sensitive information by email. Do not provide personal, financial or sensitive information (including new passwords) in response to any email purporting to be sent by an NVIDIA employee or representative.

Check back on NVIDIA Developer Zone for updates."

Submission + - Discussing Drugs, a Federal Crime ( 2

Memroid writes: The House Judiciary Committee passed a bill yesterday that would make it a federal crime for U.S. residents to discuss or plan activities on foreign soil that, if carried out in the U.S., would violate the Controlled Substances Act (CSA) — even if the planned activities are legal in the countries where they're carried out.
The Internet

Submission + - The Amazon of Drugs (

Memroid writes: Drug purchasing is becoming more mainstream in the online world with the Silk Road website. The website combines TOR and Bitcoin to creating moderately anonymous purchasing of drugs (assuming you don't purchase them from the DEA). How will websites like this fail? Will the bitcoin companies be prosecuted? From the article:

"The state is the primary source of violence, oppression, theft and all forms of coercion," Silk Road wrote to us. "Stop funding the state with your tax dollars and direct your productive energies into the black market."

Were there fewer fools, knaves would starve. - Anonymous