Catch up on stories from the past week (and beyond) at the Slashdot story archive

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:Dell, HP, Panasonic (Score 1) 403

by Megol (#49547007) Attached to: We'll Be the Last PC Company Standing, Acer CEO Says

"Personal Computers'", "Micro Computers", "Home Computers" - are all nebulous terms. .i.e the MCA bus and EISA were also in "Personal Computers", and "Business Computers". Some could argue that the IBM PS/2 was the first "true" PC (integrated VGA, mouse, keyboard, plus hard drive and floppy drive).

That makes absolutely no sense.

At one point x86 was part of the "Personal Computer" criteria, then it became anything that would interpret x86 (AMD-64).

Right. I guess you didn't call a 286 a PC? How about a 386 computer?

The step of 80286 to 80386 was much larger than the step to AMD64, but do you refer to a 80386 as "anything that would interpret x86"? Given the rest of the post I guess "yes".

Now ARM devices are "Personal Computers".

'

... I guess your phone is one too then?

Semantic pedantics enjoy pointless arguments have no point of any importance to make.

If a PC runs business software is it still a PC?

Of course. PC doesn't necessarily mean one uses it only for personal tasks.

If you put it on the floor is a desktop? Did you see those pictures of Lady Gaga? (sigh). Oh, and you're grammer is wrong. (I was going to work the word "nowadays", and the phrase "moving forwards", but...)

You are a confused individual. Try not to waste my time the next time, some thinking before writing makes a huge difference.

Comment: Re: Dell, HP, Panasonic (Score 1) 403

by Megol (#49546941) Attached to: We'll Be the Last PC Company Standing, Acer CEO Says

Most times yes. But ISA was what IBM PC compatibles were referred to as earlier when one didn't want to mention IBM... That applied to MCA, EISA, PCI etc. version of the standard.

Nowadays we just say "PC" and all but a small group will complain. Wasn't that the start of this sub-thread by the way?

Comment: Re:Dell, HP, Panasonic (Score 1) 403

by Megol (#49541187) Attached to: We'll Be the Last PC Company Standing, Acer CEO Says

Exactly. Also referred to in the past as the ISA (Industrial Standard Architecture). And even though ISA slots are long gone* PCs still are compatible with the old standard. This to the extent that some bus accesses will be artificially slowed down to conform to AT performance even though that isn't documented.

(* actually there still is remnants of it in the form of the LPC (Low Pin Count) bus)

Comment: Re:Microkernal Boner (Score 1) 225

by Megol (#49493829) Attached to: GNU Hurd 0.6 Released

Windows NT was based on a modified VMS design combined with microkernel ideas. But it never was based on or even inspired by Mach.
And while OS X does use Mach it isn't Mach - it just uses it for some functionality, not as a kernel proper.

Oh and your idea that either of them uses a generic IPC design is wrong too. QNX does though.

Comment: Re:Microkernal Boner (Score 1) 225

by Megol (#49492321) Attached to: GNU Hurd 0.6 Released

Aah, I remember back in the late 80's and early 90's everyone had a boner for microkernels. IBM even gave it a try, attempting to port OS/2 over to a microkernel so they could run it on Intel and PowerPC platforms. At one point, IBM's strategy was that they were going to build OS/2 around a microkernal and then just run THAT on all their hardware, with multi-user and security features added or removed as needed. Well, very long story, very long, they never could get it to work.

Depends on what you mean by that. They couldn't simply port stuff to the new microkernel, AIX, OS/400 etc. wasn't suitable to move to the new kernel. One of the big problems IIRC was endianess.
When the grand unified theo^H^H^H^HOS didn't work out it all fell apart. This in combination with the failure of PPC as a new personal computer platform, the disinterest of others to use the Workplace OS kernel, the failure of Taligent and a lot of other things made sure the project was canceled.

But OS/2 was ported and ran on the microkernel so that part of the project did succeed.

These days you don't see the same hype around microkernals that you did back then. So we should probably warn the HURD team: If your boner for microkernals lasts more than 25 years, you should probably consult a physician.

Any given program will expand to fill available memory.

Working...