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Comment: Re:We need something... (Score 1) 104

by McLoud (#47388031) Attached to: Famo.us: Do We Really Need Another JavaScript Framework?

What I'd really like is a Javascript-like language - that compiles to efficient Javascript - where I get to structure my application; enforce type constraints at compile-time; provide test-time assertions... etc... and allow me to implement my Javascript application as a collection of independently tested components.

So you want Ceylon then?

Comment: Re:Getters and setters (Score 1) 543

by McLoud (#44302191) Attached to: Visual Studio vs. Eclipse: a Programmer's Comparison

"One full-time Java programmer told me that he hasn’t had to manually type in any setters and getters in years, and he has a template from which all his objects are typed in automatically, thanks to the code snippet tools in his favorite editor (which isn’t Eclipse—he uses IntelliJ). Clearly, methods of automated typing seem to be a favorite among a lot of programmers. So why did Visual Studio remove a feature that facilitated this? Who knows."

Let's not mention the fact that in C# you don't need to manually type in all the getter/setter junk, just public int MyField {get; set;}

These days in java, I just use Lombok. Put an @Data over your class and it generates everything. Pull in extra @EqualsAndHashCode on entity classes so the Equals/HashCode gets generated on proper business fields for database stuff and done. No more getter/setters needed to be typed and Netbeans even recognize the new methods on save

Comment: Re:Appropriate tool use (Score 1) 211

by McLoud (#44182259) Attached to: LibreOffice Calc Set To Get GPU Powered Boost From AMD

When people go wrong using spreadsheets it's usually one of a few ways. The one I see the most is when they take what should be a prototype analysis and turn it into a production tool. If you need to put a bunch of buttons and other interface tools on a spreadsheet THEN you are doing it wrong. The second is when they try to take analyzed data involving more than 3 dimensions. While it can be done it rarely is a good idea.

Excel pivot`s is very good as a pivoting tool, and very few applications do it better, and I don't know of any that do so at excel's price range. Calc's version of it it's crap and kinda hard to setup.

Comment: Re:QT is a flawed implementation of cross platform (Score 1) 81

by McLoud (#43410947) Attached to: Qt 5.1 Adds Android and iOS Support

On Windows there is no standard widget set that everyone uses, an no agreement on how a widget should behave. Every framework has their own. MFC, WinForms, whatever MS Office uses, Wordperfect, etc.

There are standard widgets provided by the OS, and everyone who uses them will produce apps which look the same, absent customization. There are alternatives, but that doesn't change the fact.

Really? So how to I use those nice office widgets like the excel pivot or word rich text editor (since the one I can use in MFC is crap) in my own native MFC application?

Comment: Re:Yes but (Score 1) 437

by McLoud (#39971245) Attached to: Objective-C Comes of Age

Thats like saying that C/C++ adoption on windows is due to vector locking because that's what the API is built on. Due to that, C-like bridges need to be build into other languages so they could talk to the OS
The same can be done to talk to Objective-C

DISCLAIMER: have been dealing with windows api the whole week and is not funny

Comment: Its not the languare only per se (Score 1) 274

by McLoud (#39376697) Attached to: Why New Programming Languages Succeed Or Fail

It's not really just the language. It's the entire programming environment: the language, the library, what system features it allows you to get your hands into and failing that last one, how much the language has "build in" and with how much quality, how much trouble-less it is to run in your target system, how much easy is to build a program around it
The major PITA's I have found with "alternative" languages is when building beyond hello-world/clickety demos. Many languages with their respective build environments fail to provide a good desktop infrastructure to build rich apps. Some fail at the web side of it. Some ain't much good at any of it. For windows desktop apps, if you don't provide support for system widgets, you better have a alternative to the build in rich editor with printing support that can just copy/paste to/from office-like software without much trouble. Many focus too much into the "programming" side of it and relegate the integration with everything else to second plan.

Comment: Re:Oracle and Java (Score 1) 372

by McLoud (#38661630) Attached to: Oracle's Latest Java Moves Draw Industry Ire

In my experience, Microsoft has some of the best backwards compatibility of any vendor out there. Well written C++ and .NET apps on Windows will probably keep working until the heat death of the universe. Meanwhile, Java took a long time to catch on to the fact that the runtime and standard libraries aren't 100% backwards compatible, and that people may actually want to run multiple versions side-by-side. For comparison, every .NET app uses the appropriate runtime automatically.

Java Runtimes are installed side-by-side, even minor versions. And even if you have a grip with a particular installer feature, you can very well get your own folder bundled with the app and it will not touch anything else. Try that with a .NET runtime. I've seen 1.1 .NET apps fail to work properly after a 2.0 .NET runtime got installed in the system, no way to do otherwise that I know, the only solution was remove everything and stall from scratch and stop the damn f* windows update from messing with the SO.

Comment: avant + compiz or kde (Score 1) 357

by McLoud (#38460870) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Assembling a Linux Desktop Environment From Parts?

Last time I used that, I was using compiz, avant-window-manager and gDeslets. I used nautilus as filemanager, but keep in mind this was in the gnome2 days where all you needed was to lauch gnome-settings-daemon and you was set. At this day and age, I use a customized kubuntu, and plasma makes very easy to move stuff around the way I like to do, kwin is working great in 4.7.6 as window manage. The only complaints I got is kopete protocol stability (only recently msn got back to working for me) and lack of a descent SIP phone, so I got to use ekiga for that. I always used thunderbird as mail client and that's unlikely to change since it is mostly desktop-safe, same for chrome (konqueror or rekonq are still too slow;/buggy for general usage)

Thats my 0.02 brazilian cents

A Fortran compiler is the hobgoblin of little minis.

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