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Comment: Some answers to the know-it-all comments: (Score 4, Informative) 246

by CFD339 (#48641533) Attached to: 65,000 Complaints Later, Microsoft Files Suit Against Tech Support Scammers
MS didn't sue earlier because it's really hard to find a legal entity to sue. When you get one of these calls, the thing calling you is not directly attached to a land line. It's a software pbx system that may be running on a compromised machine in some part of the world. The call only gets connected to the person you talk to after you connect and the system determines you may be a real person willing to talk to someone. The calls get routed through compromised voip service providers, compromised pbx systems, or termination lines leased with false id and credit cards. By the time the provider knows what's happening, tens of thousands of calls have been made and the front end system just moves to another provider. As to "opting out" -- only legitimate telemarketing organizations bother with do not call lists. These asshats just random dial. It's cheaper.

To figure out who to sue, you have to participate in the scam long enough to have an actual transaction processed and then follow the money -- but that's not so simple now. Most of these particular kinds of scams don't accept payment at the telecenter you're talking to. They just install the ransomware on the pc. Then once you're already compromised you have to pay someone else -- through a web site, a wire payment, or some other mechanism that's much easier to hide than just a credit card transaction.

Comment: Re:How about someone who groks the math, comment? (Score 1) 197

by CFD339 (#48636971) Attached to: Quantum Physics Just Got Less Complicated
Thanks, but the only person to quote for that one (including the poor grammar) is me. I'm glad you enjoyed it. As I just said to someone else who disagrees, "If you put some steel across a span with lots of triangle shapes to it, intuitively you may look at it and say "should hold". I'd probably walk across it willingly. I would not, however, want to count on driving trucks over it regularly without someone with engineering training and rigor applying math and proven science to the problem first."

Comment: The difference between obvious and proven... (Score 1) 197

by CFD339 (#48636951) Attached to: Quantum Physics Just Got Less Complicated
If you put some steel across a span with lots of triangle shapes to it, intuitively you may look at it and say "should hold". I'd probably walk across it willingly. I would not, however, want to count on driving trucks over it regularly without someone with engineering training and rigor applying math and proven science to the problem first.

Comment: How about someone who groks the math, comment? (Score 4, Insightful) 197

by CFD339 (#48634957) Attached to: Quantum Physics Just Got Less Complicated
I'd love to read a real comment (yeah, I know, it's almost like I'm new here) from someone who is actually capable of understanding the math here. It would be great to see a reasonable discussion on the actual implications here.

As to people saying "that's obvious" -- what you can intuit and what you can prove are not the same thing. The only thing prove by a "that's obvious" comment is that the person posting it doesn't have a clue.

Comment: Re: Standard M.O. (Score 1) 148

by xmundt (#48527675) Attached to: How the NSA Is Spying On Everyone: More Revelations

The Grand Jury does not make a determination of the defendant's guilt or innocence. All it does is determine if they should go to trial. Since too often they are the prosecutor's hand puppets, the NYC and Ferguson Grand Jury results simply mean that the Prosecutor's office decided to give the cops a pass. If you think it was because they were not guilty....well...faith, even misguided, is a wonderful thing to see

Comment: Re:People are the problem (Score 4, Interesting) 82

by CFD339 (#48266731) Attached to: "Ambulance Drone" Prototype Unveiled In Holland
actually, many many people are saved by AEDs every day. I've seen it done. In one case at my daughter's school a kid's grandfather dropped during a drama production. A student ran and got the AED our department had placed in the school, a parent used it on the floor of the auditorium. The man WALKED to the ambulance when it arrived a few minutes later.

Comment: Re:8.0 percent? (Score 2) 82

by CFD339 (#48266719) Attached to: "Ambulance Drone" Prototype Unveiled In Holland
But an automatic defibrillator will not shock an arrested rhythm. The machine can only shock specific kinds of fibrillation -- where the heart is fluttering in a disorganized way that doesn't pump blood the way it should. A fully arrested heart wouldn't be detected by the machine. You'd need a trained medic to manually shock in those cases.

Comment: Re:Thunderbird too (Score 4, Informative) 112

by McDutchie (#47939479) Attached to: An Open Source Pitfall? Mozilla Labs Closed, Quietly
Thunderbird is not dead at all, it's just been relegated to community maintenance mode (like SeaMonkey has always been). There was a lot of press blather about how that amounted to the "death" of Thunderbird, meanwhile its users are happily downloading security updates with the occasional new feature, and continuing to use a relatively stable program. Considering what they're doing to Firefox, I think this is a good thing.

Comment: Re:No point encrypting if you're the only one... (Score 1) 108

And yet, as I point out, Apple has done it with iMessage. A lot of sites encrypt their traffic with SSL.

Both of these are surely compromised by the NSA by now. Certainly SSL is.

I think the real problem is one of standards.

That is a really good point. The move to closed systems is a disease that is killing the internet.

Comment: Re:No point encrypting if you're the only one... (Score 2) 108

This argument hasn't changed in twenty years, in spite of massive improvements in ease of use. Apparently, it's impossible to make it "easy enough" for the average user. I think this means ease of use actually has very little to do with the problem. The problem is with the average user's priorities. People value convenience more highly than privacy, and as long as people don't change those values, encryption will never take on. Typically people will only change their priorities under threat of dire and immediate consequences for them personally. Everyone will lock their door so they don't get burglarised. But email privacy is too abstract and invisible still. It's going to take some huge cases of identity theft, with real monetary loss, to get people to change â" and then people will probably sooner abandon email than use email encryption. Finally, the kind of convenience that you propose necessarily will render the whole thing insecure. Letting strangers (like Google) manage your private keys defeats the whole purpose.

Comment: Re:Microsoft Opened Themselves Up for Lawsuits (Score 2) 345

by McDutchie (#46910719) Attached to: Why Microsoft Shouldn't Patch the XP Internet Explorer Flaw

Oh and don't forget which OS it was that gave us heartbleed. Was it Windows? No no no no, was it OSX? No no nooo no, was it Linux? yeah yeah yeah yeah!

How does this utter shit get modded up to +4? Heartbleed is an OpenSSL bug. It's got jack to do with Linux (or any other OS). That is just the worst in the parent message. Everything else is misleading as well.

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