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Drupal Multimedia 130

Posted by samzenpus
from the read-all-about-it dept.
Michael J. Ross writes "Of the leading content management systems used by developers for creating websites, Drupal is highly regarded for many characteristics, including a much smaller initial footprint, compared to Joomla and other CMSs. Yet some developers find this a disadvantage as well, because one of the most common criticisms leveled against Drupal is its lack of built-in support for images and multimedia elements — thereby forcing new Drupal developers to choose from the thousands of contributed Drupal modules those that would be optimal for implementing their websites' multimedia functionality. Aaron Winborn's book Drupal Multimedia is intended as a guide to help such developers." Keep reading for the rest of Michael's review.
Operating Systems

+ - Mac OS X 10.6 Speed Impresses Linux Users->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "The editor at the Linux-focused Phoronix decided to provide many Mac OS X 10.6 benchmarks today that looked at all different aspects of the operating system from synthetic memory tests to ray-tracing performance and gaming on two different Macs. He spotted a few serious performance regressions but found many incredible jumps in performance... Upwards of 50% in some circumstances. Michael Larabel concludes, "We are not Mac junkies at Phoronix. Ummm, hell, we are just performance-enthused Linux fanatics with a love for benchmarking. However, the fact of the matter is, if you are a Mac OS X user and are at all concerned about the performance of your system — whether that means being a benchmarking junkie like us or just looking to squeeze the most potential out of your system whether it be for audio encoding, ray-tracing, image editing, or other computational tasks — Mac OS X 10.6 "Snow Leopard" is a must buy.""
Link to Original Source
Earth

Alaskan Blob Is an Algae Bloom 130

Posted by timothy
from the no-sixes-here-just-a-couple-of-nines dept.
Bryan Gividen writes "Time.com is running a story on the previously unidentified blob floating off of the coast of Alaska. The article states that the blob is an algae bloom — far less sinister (or exciting) than any The Thing or The Blob comparison that was jokingly made. From the article: '"It's sort of like a swimming pool that hasn't been cleaned in a while." The blob, Konar said, is a microalgae made up of 'billions and billions of individuals.'"
Microsoft

Closing Time At Microsoft's Campus Pub 393

Posted by kdawson
from the about-face-saving dept.
theodp writes "Just three days before the Spitfire pub was to open on Microsoft's Entertainment & Devices Division campus, TechFlash reports that Microsoft got cold feet and pulled the plug on the project, leaving the bar's owner and his 22 employees in the lurch. 'I am completely stunned and disappointed by the decision,' said now lease-less owner Jonathan Sposato, who's stuck with space built out as a pub, complete with a giant bar, a fireplace, and eight beer taps. (He says it wouldn't be economically viable to refit it as a restaurant.) Microsoft spokesman Lou Gellos confirmed the company's sudden change of heart: 'The goal was always to create a cool gathering place for employees, but to do so in a manner that's consistent with a business environment. We decided we should do something more appropriate, and that meant not having a pub.' The new pub had been in development for more than a year."
IT

The 100 Degree Data Center 472

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the so-take-off-all-your-clothes dept.
miller60 writes "Are you ready for the 100-degree data center? Rackable Systems has introduced a new enclosure that it says can run high-density racks safely in environments as hot as 104 degrees (40 degrees C), offering customers the option of saving energy in their data center. Most data centers operate in a range between 68 and 74 degrees. Raising the thermostat can lower the power bill, allowing data centers to use less power for cooling. But higher temperatures can be less forgiving in the event of a cooling failure, and not likely to be welcomed by employees working in the data center."
Technology (Apple)

Apple Touch-Screen Netbook? 291

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the heard-this-before dept.
je ne sais quoi writes "The Apple rumor mill is churning today. Reuters and the DOW Jones news wire are reporting that an anonymous source in Taiwan has leaked that Apple has ordered some 10-inch touch-screens from WinTek, the maker of the touch-screen for the iPhone. It looks like an Apple netbook could possibly be in the works for a delivery date in Q3 of this year, in time for back-to-school sales. CNET and Engadget have completely unsubstantiated mock-ups."

Comment: Jambi (Qt for Java) discontinued (Score 4, Informative) 62

by Maxwell42 (#27052453) Attached to: QT 4.5 Released, Plus New IDE and Analysis Tool

And for those like me who were quite excited with the new licensing and wanted to use it with java... Don't think of it...

Qt Jambi - a port of Qt to the Java programming language - has been discontinued in order to focus resources on the Qt cross platform application and UI framework. Qt Jambi will be maintained for one year after the March 2009 release of Qt Jambi 4.5.0_01, and will be made available upon release under the LGPL license

QT Programming Language Support

Mozilla

Firefox 3.2 Plans Include Natural Language, Themes 285

Posted by timothy
from the subject-to-change dept.
Shrike82 writes "Mozilla have described plans for the next version of their popular web browser, Firefox. Mozilla's "Ubiquity project" is set to become a standard feature, allowing "users to type natural language phrases into the browser to perform certain tasks, such as typing 'map 10 Downing Street' to instantly see a Google map of that address, or 'share-on-delicious' to bookmark the site you're currently visiting on the social news site." Also of interest is so-called "lightweight theming" allowing users to customise the browsers design more easily. The launch date is still somewhat unclear, and Mozilla are apparently unsure if version 3.2 will be released at all, apparently considering going straight to Firefox 4."
Handhelds

VMware Promises Multiple OSs On One Cellphone 90

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the just-make-sure-i-can-strip-it-off-if-i-want dept.
superglaze writes to tell us that VMware has announced a large effort behind their Mobile Virtualization Platform, promising the possibility of multiple operating systems on mobile devices. "The company described MVP as a 'thin layer of software' that will be embedded in handsets and 'be optimized to run efficiently on low-power-consuming and memory-constrained mobile phones.' Asked whether MVP would offer something different from the abstraction already provided by mobile Java, VMware's European product director Fredrik Sjostedt told ZDNet UK that MVP would require less recoding. 'If you want to have an application run on a Java-specific appliance, you need to code it for Java,' Sjostedt said. 'What we're introducing with MVP is an [embedded] abstraction layer below that, between the physical hardware and the software layer.'"
Security

The Real Story On WPA's Flaw 67

Posted by kdawson
from the calm-down dept.
Glenn Fleishman writes "The reports earlier today on WPA's TKIP key type being cracked were incorrect. I spoke at length with Erik Tews, the joint author of the paper that discloses a checksum weakness in TKIP that allows individual short packets to be decrypted without revealing the TKIP key. I wrote this up for Ars Technica with quite a bit of background on WEP and WPA. Tews's paper, co-written with Martin Beck, whom he credits as discovering and implementing a working crack (in aircrack-ng as a module), describes a way to use a backwards-compatible part of TKIP to exploit a weakness that remains from WEP. ARP packets and similarly short packets can be decoded. Longer packets are likely still safe, and TKIP hasn't been cracked. Don't believe the hype, but the exploit is still notable."

Comment: Save them again with long lasting solutions (Score 4, Informative) 303

by Maxwell42 (#25662765) Attached to: How To Verify CD-R Data Retention Over Time?

If you consider your data worth it, have enough time and enough money, you should probably re-burn/re-save them to long lasting media.

There was a previous post on askslashdot about this subject.
http://ask.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=08/08/27/2119252

My suggestion was to use Plasmon "Century-Disc" :
http://slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=914095&cid=24784787
(even though I have never tried it myself)

The Internet

Sprint Cuts Cogent Off the Internet 413

Posted by timothy
from the is-that-an-ectomy-or-an-otomy? dept.
superbus1929 writes "I work as a security analyst at an internet security company. While troubleshooting an issue, we learned why our customer couldn't keep his site-to-site VPN going from any location that uses Sprint as its ISP: Sprint has decided not to route traffic to Cogent due to litigation. This has a chilling effect; already, this person I worked with cannot communicate between a few sites of his, and since Sprint is stopping the connections cold (my traceroutes showed as complete, and not as timing out), it means that there is no backup plan; anyone going to Cogent from a Sprint ISP is crap out of luck."
Programming

Practical Reasons To Choose Git Or Subversion? 667

Posted by kdawson
from the while-we're-at-it-do-you-like-vi-or-emacs dept.
markmcb writes "I develop Rails applications and recently followed my lemming herd and made the switch to Git after learning some of the practical advantages Git offers over Subversion. As I'm sure there are many die-hard Subversion fans in the Slashdot audience, I'm curious what your key reasons are for sticking with Subversion. If possible, I'd like reasons that apply to 'most of the time' as opposed to arguments based on obscure features that may get used only a few times ever."

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