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Comment: Re:Good news (Score 3, Insightful) 93

by Maxo-Texas (#47425091) Attached to: Single European Copyright Title On the Horizon

So we really need a new name for when a company regularly avoids so much tax that it makes a profit off the tax system and another one for when it regularly pays zero taxes and shifts all of it's profits to another country while also consuming resources in the host company.

I kinda like parasiticorp for the second one.

The first is probably more "Evil scum back leeching bastards" but that seems too mild.

Comment: Re:The goal of 1st world countries (Score 1) 401

by Maxo-Texas (#47402463) Attached to: No Shortage In Tech Workers, Advocacy Groups Say

Right now, 85 people take in the same income as 3.5 billion other human workers.

Extend that trend forward 20 years to world with extensive automation and perhaps 400 people taking in the same income as 7.5 billion other human beings while another 1 billion making "decent" incomes still (the rest of the 3 billionis people being children, disabled, and senior citizens).

For the most part- once the wealth reaches the top- it stops. It doesn't come back down. It's not even spent. It's put into long term bonds. Bonds have to be paid for with taxes. So bonds are really just another way for the wealthiest to extract more income from the rest of society.

How do you run a society without taxing the people who hold all the money?
How do you execute an economy when most of the wealth is all piled up on the opposite side from the consuming part.

In the face of ubiquitous automation, the very concept of money breaks down. Because "money" is just a token representing hours of your life. If no one needs your labor- the hours of your life have no value monetarily.

Which means no food- no entertainment- no medical care-- i.e. nothing to lose.

How do you run a world where 60% of the adult humans have nothing to lose?

North Korea has shown us one way of doing this. The other way is violent bloody revolutions which redistribute the wealth so the game can start over again.

Comment: Re:The goal of 1st world countries (Score 1) 401

by Maxo-Texas (#47398009) Attached to: No Shortage In Tech Workers, Advocacy Groups Say

"So far, neural networks have succeeded in imitating distinct musical styles, but truly original compositions have remained elusive. Miranda is tackling that problem with an orchestra of virtual musicians â" called agents â" that interact to compose original music. "

"The ChaoSynth "soundscapes," often accompanied by Miranda on the piano, have won awards for being "musical" despite the unearthly sound of their individual parts. While pleasing when blended in composition, the everyday sounds fit no known category when isolated. "

Sounds like it still needs work.

Comment: Re:Two sides to every issue (Score 1) 401

by Maxo-Texas (#47397959) Attached to: No Shortage In Tech Workers, Advocacy Groups Say

The thing you need to realize is that they are not rewarded based on your replacement succeeding as well as you.

They are rewarded for saving money. Executive bean counters can literally redefine the goal posts as well and declare success when the project failed by the original criteria.

And finally, they can move on to another job after a fairly short time to take their money saving ideas to the new company.

Comment: Re:Two sides to every issue (Score 2) 401

by Maxo-Texas (#47397945) Attached to: No Shortage In Tech Workers, Advocacy Groups Say

Nope, it's a conspiracy.

Go to youtube.

Search for
"avoid hiring americans"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?...
"Immigration attorneys from Cohen & Grigsby explains how they assist employers in running classified ads with the goal of NOT finding any qualified applicants, and the steps they go through to disqualify even the most qualified Americans in order to secure green cards for H-1b workers. "

And...
Lou Dobbs: Law Firm teaches how to avoid hiring Americans
A law firm is teaching corporations how to get around hiring American workers for jobs so they can import foreign workers under the H1-B visa program. Lawrence M. Lebowitz, the marketing director of the Pittsburgh law firm of Cohen & Grigsby, told executives at its Immigration Law Update Seminar how to advertise...

--

Quote: "Our goal is CLEARLY not to FIND a qualified us workers."

Comment: Re:The goal of 1st world countries (Score 2) 401

by Maxo-Texas (#47397931) Attached to: No Shortage In Tech Workers, Advocacy Groups Say

No things like pastors, editors, dentists, certain lawyers, ad executives, project management, inventors, certain freelance artists, etc.

Of course some creativity won't be worth keeping so it will be designed out when the process is automated.

Example: I was on a project in 2009. Rewrite the purchase order system. It turned out to be hugely complicated because every form on the P.O. form was overloaded and when we finished there were actually 31 ways to create P.O.s. Which meant a big project, budget, etc. And there was a lot of political power in each department that prevented any of us lower than them from changing or simplifying it.

So the executives bought a new PO program that had one way of doing things and said, "This is the only way to do it now". And that was that. All the "creativity" was out- and there was one way to do P.O.'s. It didn't have complete coverage- a few things had to be done manually or as attachments (to explain to approvers what was the PO was for in better detail than supported). But mostly, all the complexity of the system was cut away so it could be replaced with a $5000ish/year product that came off the shelf.

Comment: Re:The goal of 1st world countries (Score 2) 401

by Maxo-Texas (#47397913) Attached to: No Shortage In Tech Workers, Advocacy Groups Say

A robot doesn't replace 1000 workers.

A group of robots supported by a few human workers replace 1000 workers. They cost 1/3 the price, don't make mistakes, don't get sick, etc.

Other machinists don't agree with you on the replacement aspect.
http://www.goiam.org/publicati...

http://motherboard.vice.com/bl...
"That's according to a 2013 Oxford study, which was highlighted in this week's Economist cover story. That study attempted to tally up the number of jobs that were susceptible to automization, and, surprise, a huge number were. Creative and skilled jobs done by humans were the most secureâ"think pastors, editors, and dentistsâ"but just about any rote task at all is now up for automation. Machinists, typists, even retail jobs, are predicted to disappear. "

And that's not even addressing the 3d printing aspects.

When you replace several machinists, you have a few good ones out of the 12 you let go- and you take the one who is willing to work 24/7 for $10 to $15 bucks an hour.

I think they are off on "editing"-- it's partially being automated, partially being crowdsourced, and what's left- they just have stopped doing. I've seen "howlers" in professionally published (not self published) paper and hard back books increasingly over the last 10 years.

Agree with you entirely on the white-collar jobs which are not 90%+ creative. Jobs with less creativity will be combined and the creative parts done by consultants or designed out.

Comment: Re:The goal of 1st world countries (Score 1) 401

by Maxo-Texas (#47397875) Attached to: No Shortage In Tech Workers, Advocacy Groups Say

For example, drug use of course but increasingly also

smoking
drinking alcohol

Less common but more common by the year.
engaging in risky sports.
going on a vacation where you can't be reached by cell phone.
Saying something unpopular that "reflects badly on the company" even tho you did it on your own time.
being unreachable outside of working hours for more than a short period.
taking certain prescription drugs.
not taking certain prescription drugs (blood tests better show their presence).

etc.

I'm sure you can think of more now.

Comment: Re:The goal of 1st world countries (Score 1) 401

by Maxo-Texas (#47397861) Attached to: No Shortage In Tech Workers, Advocacy Groups Say

Interesting.

So do you think that you could replace a good advertising executive with an automated process?

Or a creative lawyer who thinks of new ways to argue existing laws?

Isn't dealing with ever changing exceptions being creative?

----

One thing about the ever changing exceptions is that companies are eliminating those by eliminating options and reducing the domain space (or eliminating it entirely).

For example with customer service menu trees and automated websites (and even automated chatbots).

"Call immediately. Time is running out. We both need to do something monstrous before we die." -- Message from Ralph Steadman to Hunter Thompson

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