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Comment Yeah, so what's up with soda stream? (Score 1) 570

Hmm, I get crappy fake versions of the pop I like after buying some machine and shooting spritz that my grandfather used to have in a fancy glass bottle.

You'd have to drink a *whole lot* of pop to make that worthwhile, and I suspect if you do you could get bulk purchases of coke for even less.

Seriously, how did that become a thing?

Comment Or in other words... (Score 1) 146

> the price they've come up with is eye-popping: $5 billion.

Apple claims to have sold 13 million iPhones on launch weekend. Assuming an average price of $800, that's 10 billion in two days.

So this doesn't impress me much. Or at all. I suspect its at least an order of magnitude higher than their estimate.

Comment Right, so... (Score 2) 213

"Apple is also claiming a level of gaming performance on par with dedicated game consoles"

Which is just one more reason I can't understand why they didn't put this in the new Apple TV, and instead put in the older A8.

The resolution of the iPhone is basically 1080p, and according to the benches, the A9 can drive it to (as they put it) "console level performance".

The A8 can't. And since that's what's going into the ATV, that means the games on the new ATV will *not* have "console level performance".


No, don't say it's production quantities. Apple will sell 20x iPhones and iPads as ATVs (or more), this is a rounding error.

Form factor changed too, so if you needed more room for heat or power, that's not an issue either.

Comment What school is she talking about? (Score 1) 246

"NASA astronaut Mae Jemison schools treat science like the class where fun goes to die. "Kids come out of the chute liking science. They ask, 'How come? Why? What's this?' They pick up stuff to examine it. We might not call that science, but it's discovering the world around us," says Jemison. "Once we get them in school, we turn science from discovery and hands-on to something you're supposed to do through rote memorization"

That doesn't describe any school I've ever been to.

It certainly doesn't describe my high school, which was mostly experiment based.

And it certainly doesn't describe my daughter's high school, which is pretty much entirely experiment based.

As far as my limited sample goes (which included a number of high schools in the area) the curriculum is much more experimental than when I was in school, and I wouldn't call my classes anything remotely like rote memorization.

Maybe she should do some more experiments on schooling.

Comment Re: Its all in the taxes and incentives. (Score 1) 211

> Not really impressive if you consider what it cost to accomplish.

Two statements here:

"Not really impressive"

If you think supplying power at lower end-user prices than in the 1980s is not impressive, you've allowed your politics to ruin your brain.

" if you consider what it cost to accomplish."

What it cost to accomplish was "install the lowest cost form of power ever" and "make a grid to interconnect it".

The ultimate proof is on the bill. If power is selling for less now than it did in the past, it succeeded. End of story.

Comment Re:Its all in the taxes and incentives. (Score 1) 211

Actually electric cars will add very little to the grid load.

I did a similar calculation for the UK, where it appears the slack in existing generation assets will cover all the driven miles.

Comment Re:Its all in the taxes and incentives. (Score 1) 211

> Apply this to any generation technology and the result would be pretty much the same.

They did, since the grid really became interconnected and deregulated.

Ontario's been selling off excess nuclear at below-zero for years. They can't throttle it, someone has to take it, so they pay New York and Michigan to throttle down their coal and gas plants.

This has been happening for decades, except now we conflate it with renewables because there's millions of dollars in ad buys being spent to tell you how bad all of this is.

The trouble with doing something right the first time is that nobody appreciates how difficult it was.