Slashdot is powered by your submissions, so send in your scoop


Forgot your password?
Slashdot Deals: Deal of the Day - Pay What You Want for the Learn to Code Bundle, includes AngularJS, Python, HTML5, Ruby, and more. ×

Submission + - T-Mobile USA IPv6 Beta is launched! (

An anonymous reader writes: As we all know, IPv4 is running out quick. Comcast and Google have dipped their toes in the vast ocean of IPv6 and now T-Mobile is testing the water as well. I do believe 2010 represents s change in the winds, and IPv6 is now serious business since IPv4 is seriously running out.

Submission + - Oregon Tea Party steals Anonymous slogan

An anonymous reader writes: As many web blogs and sites have pointed out, the Tea Party has stirred up the anger of the 4chan group Anonymous. In response, Anonymous began flooding the Oregon Tea Party's facebook page and various other related sites.

Submission + - Wikileaks posts mysterious "insurance" file

betterunixthanunix writes: Wikileaks has posted a mysterious "insurance" file, which has no description but is encrypted with AES256. Cryptome has posted some speculation that this file may have been posted in case something happens to the Wikileaks website, in which case the passphrase would be divulged by Wikileaks staff.

Submission + - Windows 7 trounces Windows XP at green computing (

Arnie writes: Mindteck, a company that offers embedded software development and consultancy services, has released power consumption data after testing sleep, idle, low-use, and high-use scenarios of various Windows PCs. The researchers also built a model to estimate cost savings by using a centralized power management policy. What really piqued our interest, though, was that Mindteck looked at the effect of processor chipset drivers on the power consumption (in watts) of Windows XP and Windows 7 with varying driver configurations and older hardware.

Submission + - Buzzing About Comic-Con, Digital Comics, E-Books (

sperlingreich writes: Geoff Boucher of the Los Angeles Times, Alex Billington of First Showing and Anne Thompson of indieWIRE discuss all the movies and TV shows that created buzz at this year's Comic-Con. Alex Pham of the L.A. Times talks about digital comics and e-books. Rachel Deahl of Publisher's weekly details a controversy brewing in the publishing industry.

Submission + - how intellectual property (IP) stifles innovation

freeasinrealale writes: This paper provides empirical evidence on how intellectual property (IP) on a given technology affects subsequent innovation. To shed light on this question, I analyze the sequencing of the human genome by the public Human Genome Project and the private firm Celera, and estimate the impact of Celera's gene-level IP on subsequent scientific research and product development outcomes. Celera's IP applied to genes sequenced first by Celera, and was removed when the public effort re-sequenced those genes. I test whether genes that ever had Celera's IP differ in subsequent innovation, as of 2009, from genes sequenced by the public effort over the same time period, a comparison group that appears balanced on ex ante gene-level observables. A complementary panel analysis traces the effects of removal of Celera's IP on within-gene flow measures of subsequent innovation. Both analyses suggest Celera's IP led to reductions in subsequent scientific research and product development outcomes on the order of 30 percent. Celera's short-term IP thus appears to have had persistent negative effects on subsequent innovation relative to a counterfactual of Celera genes having always been in the public domain.
Internet Explorer

Submission + - UK Government Browser Modernisation Attitude Fail 1

Tetch writes: The UK Government has now responded to the e-petition calling on it to upgrade its web services so as to enable staff and citizens to use a better browser than Internet Explorer 6.

Unfortunately the response leaves a lot to be desired — here's a precis :

"In response to the concerns of many people regarding the security of Internet Explorer 6 and the use of this software by Government Departments the Cabinet Office can confirm that the Government takes internet security very seriously.
It is not straightforward for HMG departments to upgrade IE versions on their systems. Upgrading these systems to IE8 can be a very large operation, taking weeks to test and roll out to all users. To test all the web applications currently used by HMG departments can take months at significant potential cost to the taxpayer. It is therefore more cost effective in many cases to continue to use IE6 and rely on other measures, such as firewalls and malware scanning software, to further protect public sector internet users."

Sounds more like MBA spin than a professional and responsible attitude .. sigh

Submission + - Dawkins to arrest Pope Benedict ( 3

xavieramont writes: From TimesOnline UK: "RICHARD DAWKINS, the atheist campaigner, is planning a legal ambush to have the Pope arrested during his state visit to Britain “for crimes against humanity”. Dawkins and Christopher Hitchens, the atheist author, have asked human rights lawyers to produce a case for charging Pope Benedict XVI over his alleged cover-up of sexual abuse in the Catholic church. The pair believe they can exploit the same legal principle used to arrest Augusto Pinochet, the late Chilean dictator, when he visited Britain in 1998." If this doesn't kickstart the Apocalypse, I don't know what will.

Submission + - What Chernobyl Looks Like In 2010 (

An anonymous reader writes: The editor of has toured Chernobyl's Zone of Alienation (the 30km zone surrounding the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant) to see what the area still looks like 24 years after the world's largest nuclear disaster. Many photographs from touring Chernobyl in 2010 have now been published and some related text, showing off the power plant and its RBMK reactors, the town of Pripyat, the town of Chernobyl, and the Red Forest. The 24th anniversary of this deadly nuclear disaster will be on April 26.

Submission + - SETI turns 50: special series of online reports (

An anonymous reader writes: On 8 April 1960, Frank Drake aimed a radio telescope in West Virginia at two nearby stars in the first modern search for extraterrestrial intelligence. Fifty years later, the science of SETI has come a long way – challenging stereotypes and technological limits along the way. But it has also just begun.

Submission + - Pirate Party teach Aussie seniors to hack filter (

ChiefMonkeyGrinder writes: Computerworld UK reports that pro-euthanasia group Exit International is holding national hacking courses, to teach people how to bypass the Federal Government's planned ISP-level Internet content filter with help from the Australian Pirate Party. Exit International director and controversial Australian physician, Philip Nitschke, created the class to help the elderly access euthanasia-assistance material online, following fears that the Internet filter will block access to the information.

Submission + - Google gives the US Government access to Gmail (

schliz writes: Google condemns the Chinese Government for censoring its results, and Australia for planning to do the same. Meanwhile, its lawyers and security experts have told employees to "be intentionally vague about whether or not we've given access to end-user accounts", according to engineer James Tarquin, hinting that Google may be sharing its data with the US Government. Perhaps Australia's most hated communications minister Steven Conroy could be right in his criticism of Google's privacy record after all.

Submission + - iPad Sales Fall Short Of Estimates 1

sopssa writes: "Despite the hype around iPad, its first-day sales didn't manage to live up to expectations. Apple shares fell slightly after the company released its first-day iPad sales. "While there was some of the usual hysteria, the numbers of actual bodies in queues outside Apple stores were significantly low. Over the weekend we saw some footage of empty queue stalls which was vaguely like when we popped into Disneyland Florida in November." Today the Wall Street Journal published a statement from Apple which said that more than 300,000 Ipads were sold on day one. "This would be considered great, but if you take into account the fact the figure included all the pre-sales and the hype that said a million would be flogged on Day One that number is dismal." According to the WSJ, Wall Street took a deep breath when analysts heard the figures."

I have a theory that it's impossible to prove anything, but I can't prove it.