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Journal: Systemd - Efficiency and Pike's Rules of Programming 1

Journal by phantomfive

(DISCLAIMER: These are my notes and might be wrong.)

Lennart Poettering has never heard of Rob Pike's rules of programming. Let's examine why:

He said, "On my system the scripts in /etc/init.d call grep at least 77 times.... that has to be incredibly slow...., and should be rewritten in C."

You can time it yourself, with this command:

time for i in {1..77}; do grep user /etc/passwd > /dev/null; done

On my machine it takes 0.229 seconds.

Lennart didn't get the speed increase he wanted. From his benchmark report, "booting up with Upstart takes 27s, with systemd we reach 24s." This result isn't too bad: when I've made a similar mistake of writing code before timing anything, ignoring Pike's rules for programming, once I actually slowed the system down.

If you don't measure, you can't optimize.

For entertainment and enlightenment, here is a quote by Ken Thompson talking vaguely about Pike's rules for programming:

Early Unix programmers became good at modularity because they had to be. An OS is one of the most complicated pieces of code around. If it is not well structured, it will fall apart. There were a couple of early failures at building Unix that were scrapped. One can blame the early (structureless) C for this, but basically it was because the OS was too complicated to write. We needed both refinements in tools (like C structures) and good practice in using them (like Rob Pike's rules for programming) before we could tame that complexity.

User Journal

Journal: SystemD: The Beginning 7

Journal by phantomfive

DISCLAIMER: THIS CODE REVIEW IS A LONG WORK IN PROGRESS, I COULD BE COMPLETELY WRONG IN ANYTHING I SAY.

To do a proper code review, you need to understand the purpose of the code, what all the stakeholders want. From my own perspective, init scripts work fine, but since Unix companies keep trying to create new init systems, they must have different needs than I do.

Here's a list of the stakeholders. I need to figure out what their goals are.
1) System admins.
2) Desktop users.
3) Distro builders.
5) Android (if systemd turns out to be good enough).
4) Programmers

My suspicion is that systemd has taken over because it makes things easier for 3.

At its core, Unix is a system for programmers. What other system comes with a compiler and multiple interpreters by default? Bash is so much more useable than DOS, or even powershell (yeah, go ahead and flame me but I'm right, Powershell doesn't even have < working). Unix was designed by programmers and for programmers.

The reason I'm talking about it is the traditional init process is incredibly discoverable. All you have to do is look in the /etc/rc directories, and you can figure out how your system boots. You can see it all. For a programmer it's easy. Poking around in the system to understand it is one thing that makes Unix great (and what I like about Slackware: the whole thing is lovingly crafted).

So that describes the approach I am taking to code review, and to the init process. Hopefully Systemd is an improvement.

I go on working for the same reason a hen goes on laying eggs. -- H.L. Mencken

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