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Your Rights Online

Submission + - 150 copyright notices for Mega (

Master Moose writes: Kim Dotcom's Mega file sharing site has been stung with 150 copyright warnings, according to an international report.

Dotcom launched the new fire-sharing website on January 20 in a blaze of fireworks and publicity.

Less than two weeks later and is reporting the company removed content after receiving 150 copyright infringement notices.

United States

Submission + - DotCom offers the DoJ a Deal (

Master Moose writes: Kim Dotcom claims the United States criminal case against him is collapsing but he is offering to go there without extradition provided federal authorities unfreeze his millions of dollars.

In a now hallmark style, he made the offer on Twitter.

"Hey DOJ, we will go to the US," he tweeted, "No need for extradition. We want bail, funds unfrozen for lawyers & living expenses."

In an interview with The Hollywood Reporter Dotcom says the department knows it does not have a case.

"If they are forced to provide discovery, then there will be no extradition. That's why they don't want to provide discovery. If they had a case, they would not need to hide what they have."

Your Rights Online

Submission + - Kim Dotcom Trial may not occur (

Master Moose writes: The criminal charges against Kim Dotcom in the United States may never get to trial, the judge overseeing the case has told the FBI.

United States district court judge Liam O'Grady said he didn't know if "we are ever going to have a trial in this matter" after being told Dotcom's file-sharing company had never been formally served with criminal papers by the US.

The comment has been seized on by Dotcom's lawyers, who say it could lead to the extradition case in New Zealand being tossed out.

Your Rights Online

Submission + - Studios want reduced fees to go after "Pirates" (

Master Moose writes: Movie studios are about to push the New Zealand Government to lower the fees they have to pay internet providers to out copyright pirates under the so-called "Skynet" law that took effect last year.

The Economic Development Ministry has kicked off a promised review of the $25 fee that rights holders must pay internet providers to send infringement notices to customers accused of piracy under the "three strikes regime"

New Zealand seems to be building a history of bending to US the mostly US based recording and Movie industry. See Kim Dotcom and Warner Brothers filming of the Hobbit as recent examples.

Would the reduction of this fee lead to abuses where infringements are spammed to "suspects" as seen around the world, or with less of their cost being covered, are the ISPs less likely to co-operate?

After getting such controversial bills passed, is this further proof that these industries will never be satisfied?

Lord of the Rings

Submission + - Hollywood Bullys British Pub (

Master Moose writes: British actor Stephen Fry says he is ''ashamed'' of the film industry following news a popular English pub called The Hobbit is being threatened with legal action.

Fry, who is in Wellington, New Zealand filming Sir Peter Jackson's The Hobbit, this morning tweeted: "Honestly, @savethehobbit, sometimes I'm ashamed of the business I'm in. What pointless, self-defeating bullying".

The popular Southampton music venue has traded with the name for more than 20 years, the Mail Online reported.

Submission + - 1st stikes in New Zealand Anti Piracy Laws ( 1

Master Moose writes: New Zealand's Largest ISPs confirmed yesterday that they had received their first notices under the Government's new copyright regime, which came into effect on September 1.

All the notices received so far appear to be from the Recording Industry Association of New Zealand (Rianz).

Telecom received 42 notices — 35 for alleged download of songs by R&B star Rihanna, six for Lady Gaga tunes and one for British recording artist Taio Cruz.

Curiously the music rather than the movie industry has fired the first shot as it was believed the Motion Picture Association was keen to go after copyright infringers.

All programmers are playwrights and all computers are lousy actors.