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Submission + - Future of 5G Technology – What is the Benefits (itechrats.com)

itechrats writes: This is still the age of the 4G revolution, a technology which is providing the super fast mobile data service. It is still good enough in both coverage and speed capabilities. 4G technology is capable of providing internet speed of up to 150Mbps in areas where they are offering double LTE connections.

Submission + - Fatal statistical flaw in premiss renders ACLU racial profiling report invalid (aclu.org) 1

ranavir writes: According to ACLU and their sources in the newly released report on racial profiling in Florida's seatbelt enforcement, the seatbelt use rate is 91.5% among whites, and 85.8% among blacks. ACLU concludes racial profiling by Florida police, and is outraged that blacks get fined 1.9x more often, which is by far not explained by the difference in seatbelt use rate, which they consider negligible. The report further claims that "For differences in seatbelt use to explain the statistically significant racial disparities in citation rates documented by this report, Black people in Florida would have to wear seatbelts at a rate nearly forty-five percentage points lower than white people." This is mathematically false, because they mistake and substitute seatbelt-use rate ratio for not-wearing seatbelt ratio. (According to their numbers, the offense rate among blacks is currently rounded to 1.7x higher, 14.2% vs 8.5%, which is responsible for majority of the extra citations, whereas if blacks wore seatbelts 45pp less often than whites, the offense ratio would be 6.3x higher — 53.5% vs. 8.5%) Such a major flaw in the premiss unfortunately renders the report and its conclusions invalid.

Submission + - DVDFab Meta Info Upload Competition - Sufficient Awards (dvdfab.cn)

lydiawang writes: Users have contributed metadata for more than 5000 Blu-ray discs since DVDFab Meta Info is unveiled. Now, we want more users in, to build and share a huge multimedia library, that's why we roll out DVDFab Meta Info Upload Competition. Everyone as long as you are a DVDFab user can make significant influence on building huge multimedia network, and benefit from it in the later video experience.
You can get more close to DVDFab Meta Info from: http://www.dvdfab.cn/metainfo....

Join in DVDFab Meta Info upload competition, you can get sufficient awards:
1) Amazon Gift Card
The volunteers/contributor will accumulate $1 for uploading the Metadata of a Blu-ray movie disc, $1.5 for a season disc, respectively.

2) Ultimate Award:
The top three contributors accumulating more than $100 will get an extra $500, $300, $100, respectively. And the final winners will be named in the next official newsletter, please keep your eyes on DVDFab.

3) Enjoy 30% Discount on Star Blu-ray Products

For more details, please visit:http://www.dvdfab.cn/promotion.htm

Time: The competition ends on February 20, 2016

Submission + - Britney Spears's Guide to Physics Is Still the Best Science Website (From 1999) (vice.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Motherboard reports, "At the dawn of the millennium, something beautiful and weird emerged from the era’s cultural detritus and made it onto the then-burgeoning internet: Britney Spears’ Guide to Semiconductor Physics, found via the unassuming URL britneyspears.ac. The site featured pages of information on everything from the basics of how semiconductors work—for example, how materials like silicon can be “doped” with impurities to carry an electrical current, and are the basis of modern electronics—to entries on the “finite barrier quantum well” and “photolithography”. All of it is allegedly written by Britney Spears, whom the site casts as being a physics genius as well as a pop star. But in reality, the site was was created by a young theoretical physics post-grad at the University of Essex named Carl Hepburn. It’s sort of like InfoSec Taylor Swift, but for physics instead of cybersecurity, and from a time when we thought wearing neckties like belts was a good idea. ... “I have no regrets about setting up the site,” Hepburn wrote me in an email. “Unless I have some brilliant idea in physics or do something else that becomes as well known it will probably be the only thing that people remember about me.”" — More at BBC

Submission + - More People In Europe Are Dying Than Are Being Born (phys.org)

jones_supa writes: More people in Europe are dying than are being born, according to a new report co-authored by a Texas A&M University demographer. In contrast, births exceed deaths, by significant margins, in Texas and elsewhere in the United States, with few exceptions. The researchers find that in Europe, deaths exceeded births in most of the counties of Germany, Hungary, Croatia, Romania, Bulgaria and the Czech Republic, as well as in Sweden and the Baltic States. Further south, natural decrease is found occurring in the majority of the counties of Greece, Portugal and Italy. More births than deaths (natural increase) is widespread in Ireland, Cyprus, Iceland, Lichtenstein and Luxembourg. "Natural decrease is much more common in Europe than in the U.S because its population is older, fertility rates are lower and there are fewer women of child-bearing age," the researchers explain. "Natural decrease is a major policy concern because it drains the demographic resilience from a region diminishing its economic viability and competitiveness."

Submission + - Could Paris Happen Here?

HughPickens.com writes: National Security experts Steven Simon and Daniel Benjamin write in the NYT that in the aftermath of the terror attacks in Paris, most Americans probably feel despair, and a presentiment that it is only a matter of time before something similar happens here. "But such anxiety is unwarranted. In fact, it’s a mistake to assume that America’s security from terrorism at home is comparable to Europe’s. For many reasons, the United States is a significantly safer place. While vigilance remains essential, no one should panic." According to Simon and Benjamin the slaughter in France depended on four things: easy access to Paris, European citizens happy to massacre their compatriots, a Euro-jihadist infrastructure to supply weapons and security agencies that lacked resources to monitor the individuals involved — problems the United States does not have — at least not nearly to the degree that Europe does, undermining its ability to defend itself.

For example, Europe’s external border controls allow for free border-crossing inside most of the European Union, making it life simple for criminals. But the United States doesn’t have this problem. Pretty much anyone coming to the United States from Middle Eastern war zones or the radical underground of Europe would need to come by plane, and, since 9/11, we have made it tough for such people to fly to the United States. The United States has another advantage: an intelligence, law enforcement and border-control apparatus that has been vastly improved since the cataclysm of 9/11. Post-9/11 visa requirements and no-fly lists weed out most bad actors, and both the Bush and Obama administrations demanded that countries in our visa waiver program provide data on extremists through information-sharing pacts called HSPD-6 agreements. "None of this should lead American authorities, or the American people, to settle into a false sense of security," conclude Simon and Benjamin adding that "what the Paris attacks show is that the world needs America’s intelligence and security resources even more than its military might."

Submission + - Anonymous Vows Revenge for ISIS Paris Attacks (#OpParis)

An anonymous reader writes: As usual, Anonymous members are quicker to respond to threats than investigators and have announced #OpParis as revenge for the Paris attacks. Their action is similar to #OpISIS from this spring, launched after the Charlie Hebdo attacks. Previously Anonymous ousted thousands of ISIS Twitter accounts in #OpISIS.

Submission + - The Sophisticated Business of Today's Most Nasty Phishing Attacks

snydeq writes: Forget Nigerian princes — today’s spearphishing is sophisticated business, fooling even the most seasoned security pros, writes InfoWorld's Roger A. Grimes, in a look at what sets today’s most sophisticated spearphishing attempts apart. 'Most of the time, phishing attempts are a minor menace we solve with a Delete key. Enter spearphishing: a targeted approach to phishing that is proving nefariously effective, even against the most seasoned security pros. Why? Because they are crafted by thoughtful professionals who seem to know your business, your current projects, your interests. They don’t tip their hand by trying to sell you anything or claiming to have money to give away. In fact, today’s spearphishing attempts have far more sinister goals than simple financial theft.'

Submission + - Nvidia's GTX970 has a rather serious memory allocation bug (lazygamer.net)

An anonymous reader writes: NVidia’s GTX 970 is the current price-to-performance darling, offering incredible visual for incredible value. It seems, however, that it’s harbouring a dark secret. It’s a 4GB card, but it looks like a significant chunk of that VRAM doesn’t work.

Submission + - Mini Gaming PCs -- Promising, But Not Ready (arstechnica.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Ars has reviewed an AMD-powered mini gaming rig made by Gigabyte. The box itself is small and solid, and it runs a pretty beefy video card for its size. The manufacturer even claims Linux support, though the device ships with Windows 8.1. Unfortunately, reality lags a bit behind their plans — Ubuntu boots OK, but driver support is a mess. SteamOS won't run at all. The box is also limited by a mediocre CPU, which is itself limited by heat and power constraints. The review says the machine was 'intriguing and frustrating in equal measure' because 'its ambition is rarely matched by its execution.' It concludes: 'With some time and some different components, a little desktop that can deliver a great gaming experience will surely follow.'

Submission + - Sina suspends book site after pornography reported (wfsb.com)

Elizaberp writes: BEIJING (AP) — Sina.com temporarily closed its literature site Friday after being accused of hosting pornography, and authorities confirmed they were revoking two crucial licenses, ensnaring one of China's top web portals in an intensifying online crackdown.

Sina decided to take books off its site while it undergoes "a self-correction action" to screen their content, according to a notice on its reading channel. Book reviews, cultural news, author biographies and interviews were still available.

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