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+ - German Intelligence Spying On Allies, Recorded Kerry, Clinton, And Kofi Annan->

Submitted by cold fjord
cold fjord (826450) writes "Foreign Policy reports, "The revelation that Germany spies on Turkey, a NATO member, should dispel any notion that spying on allies violates the unwritten rules of international espionage ... For nearly a year, the extent of NSA surveillance on German leaders ... has drawn stern rebuke from the German political and media establishment. ... Merkel went so far as to publicly oust the CIA station chief in Berlin. "Spying among friends is not at all acceptable," Merkel said ... However, Germany's sanctimony toward "friendly" espionage is now a huge embarrassment ... Over the weekend, Der Spiegel reported ... Germany's foreign intelligence collection agency, was spying on Turkey. It also reported ... calls made by Secretary of State John Kerry and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton were accidentally recorded. ..... Turkey's Foreign Ministry said that if the allegations are true, they are "totally unacceptable." Turkey also summoned German Ambassador ... Pohl ... demanding an explanation. ... Lindsay Moran, a former CIA ... officer, doesn't believe that the German spying on American officials was an accident. "I find the notion that [Clinton and Kerry] were accidentally overheard preposterous," ... "It's a kind of delightful revelation given the fact that the Germans have been on their high horse." Christian Whiton, a former ... State Department senior advisor, added that the report on German spying is a perfect example of why rifts over intelligence among allies should be handled quietly and privately." — The Wall Street Journal reports, "Cem Özdemir, the head of the Green party and a leading German politician of Turkish descent, told Spiegel Online it would be "irresponsible" for German spies not to target Turkey given its location as a transit country for Islamic State militants from Europe." More at Spiegel Online and The Wall Street Journal."
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+ - Our Sinking World->

Submitted by Maddie Kahn
Maddie Kahn (3542515) writes "If you want to preserve a fish you've caught on Kulinus, a tiny island in the Tigak region of Papua New Guinea, your best bet is to smoke it. Ice, available from the store an hour and a half away if you’re lucky enough to own a boat with a motor, is a foreign concept here. But when Brooke Jarvis meet Ramis Thomas, an elder in the village, ice is on his mind. The night before, most of the island was swamped by high tides, with residents staying up most of the night to keep their belongings from floating away. Thomas says that Kulenus now has perhaps a quarter of the land area he remembers from childhood, and though his concept of natural ice is from a vaguely remembered movie scene (you’re thinking of Titanic, another man offers), he’s heard that melting ice far away is the reason his island is disappearing. He wants to know how much ice has yet to melt—if it’s all already gone, perhaps his people can stay here, holding onto the edge of a tenuous situation. I tell him there’s a lot more. “Then we will have to move,” he says. “I’m sorry about our island, but life is important.”"
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+ - Systemd: Harbinger of the Linux Apocalypse->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "It might not be the end of the world, but the design of systemd and the attitudes of its developers have been counterproductive

Now that Red Hat has released RHEL 7 with systemd in place of the erstwhile SysVinit, it appears that the end of the world is indeed approaching. A schism and war of egos is unfolding within the Linux community right now, and it is drawing blood on both sides. Ultimately, no matter who "wins," Linux looks to lose this one"

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+ - Why Chinese Hackers Would Want US Hospital Patient Data->

Submitted by itwbennett
itwbennett (1594911) writes "In a follow-up to yesterday's story about the Chinese hackers who stole hospital data of 4.5 million patients, IDG News Service's Martyn Williams set out to learn why the data, which didn't include credit card information was so valuable. The answer is depressingly simple: people without health insurance can potentially get treatment by using medical data of one of the hacking victims. John Halamka, chief information officer of the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and chairman of the New England Healthcare Exchange Network, said a medical record can be worth between $50 and $250 to the right customer — many times more than the amount typically paid for a credit card number, or the cents paid for a user name and password. 'If I am one of the 50 million Americans who are uninsured ... and I need a million-dollar heart transplant, for $250 I can get a complete medical record including insurance company details,' he said."
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Comment: Why are Librarians taking chances with Mein Kampf? (Score 1) 190

It is stupid to think destroying lab stocks removes the 'problem'.

The 'problem' is not these stocks but undiscovered natural reservoirs of diseases.

Destroying the stock reduces capability of the biomedical community to respond to fresh out breaks.

+ - Cosmologists Prove Negative Mass Can Exist In Our Universe

Submitted by KentuckyFC
KentuckyFC (1144503) writes "The idea of negative mass has fascinated scientists since it was first used in the 16th century to explain why metals gain weight when they are oxidised. Since then, theoretical physicists have shown how it could be used to create exotic objects such as wormholes and the Alcubierre warp drive. But cosmologists' attempts to include negative matter in any reasonable model of the cosmos have always run into trouble because negative mass violates the energy conditions required to make realistic universes with Einstein's theory of general relativity. Now a pair of cosmologists have round a way round this. By treating negative mass as a perfect fluid rather than a solid point-like object, they've shown that negative mass does not violate the energy conditions as had been thought and so must be allowed in our universe. That has important consequences. If positive and negative mass particles were created in the early universe, they would form a kind of plasma that absorbs gravitational waves. Having built a number of gravitational wave observatories that have to see a single gravitational wave, astronomers might soon need to explain the absence of observations. Negative mass would then come in extremely handy."

+ - Scientists Unveil Aircraft Technologies of The Future

Submitted by stephendavion
stephendavion (2872091) writes "Scientists and engineers at BAE Systems have lifted the lid on some futuristic technologies that could be incorporated in military and civil aircraft of 2040 or even earlier.

The four technologies unveiled are: 3D printers so advanced they could print UAVs during a mission; aircraft parts that can heal themselves in minutes; a new type of long range aircraft which divides into a number of smaller aircraft when it reaches its destination, and a directed energy weapon that could engage missiles at the speed of light, destroy them and protect the people below.

"

+ - UK government to rush in emergency surveillance laws-> 2

Submitted by beaker_72
beaker_72 (1845996) writes "The Guardian reports that the UK government has unveiled plans to introduce emergency surveillance laws into the UK parliament at the beginning of next week. These are aimed at reinforcing the powers of security services in the UK to force service providers to retain records of their customers phone calls and emails. The laws, which have been introduced after the European Court of Justice (ECJ) ruled that existing laws invaded individual privacy, will receive cross-party support and so will not be subjected to scrutiny or challenged in Parliament before entering the statute books. But as Tom Watson (Labour backbench MP and one of few dissenting voices) has pointed out, the ECJ ruling was six weeks ago, so why has the government waited until now to railroad something through. Unless of course they don't want it scrutinised too closely."
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+ - 4G 'inherently less secure' than 3G->

Submitted by sweetpea86
sweetpea86 (2546266) writes "4G mobile networks are inherently less secure than 3G networks and other mobile protocols, security experts have warned. Before 4G, all voice and data traffic between the user’s device and the core of the network was encrypted and tightly-controlled by the mobile operator. Now, with 4G technology, encryption is only mandatory over the main Radio Access Network (RAN). The 'backhaul' portion of the network is unencrypted by default, leaving it potentially vulnerable to hackers. Some operators do encrypt the backhaul traffic on their networks, using a technology called IPsec, but many operators around the world, including some in Europe, have chosen to deploy 4G leaving the traffic between the core network and some or all of their cell sites vulnerable to attack."
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