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+ - Dark Energy a Misinterpretation of Supernovae Data-> 2

Submitted by
ned14
ned14 writes "Can it be that dark energy only came about due to misinterpretation of the data?

"Using Maupertuis' form of the principle of least action, Annila has calculated that the brightness of light from Type 1a supernovae after travelling many millions of light-years to Earth agrees well with observations of the known amount of energy in the universe, and doesn't require dark energy or any other additional driving force."

The full paper is available without paying from http://www.helsinki.fi/~aannila/arto/light.pdf. Me personally, unless my eyes are wonky, in the graph plotting distance against redshift the least-time path doesn't sit in the middle of the data points at the top, and I can't find a R squared goodness of fit in the paper. Nevertheless, there is still remarkable agreement without needing to add mass.

It's good to see a testable theory eliminating the need for dark energy — the article suggests that new data from Gravity Probe B should be enough to test this approach. Another testable result using the same least action approach is Mercury's precession where it varies very slightly from GR (http://arxiv.org/abs/1009.1571)."

Link to Original Source

Microsoft

+ - Nokia' s First "REAL" Windows Phone ->

Submitted by mikejuk
mikejuk (1801200) writes "And so it begins.
There is a very real sense in which Windows Phone 7 has been on hold since the deal between Microsoft and Nokia for it to switch from Symbian to Windows Phone 7. Nokia has just launched the Lumia 800, its first Windows 7 phone, and it is basically a modified N9. CEO Stephen Elop said:
"It's a new dawn for Nokia"
he also called it
"the first real Windows Phone"
and
"We believe it is the first ever instantiation of the Windows Phone platform that properly embodies, complements and amplifies the design sensibilities of Windows Phone"

This certainly confirms the reason why developers might have been holding off creating apps for earlier devices. The bad news is that it is being launched in Europe now but the US wont see one until early 2012 so missing the holiday season.
Now we have to see if Nokia's hardware can make a sucess of Microsoft's software."

Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Give VirtualBox a try! (Score 2, Informative) 384

by Mark_Uplanguage (#33987000) Attached to: Recommendations For Home Virtualization?
I've set up all of my kids with Ubuntu Linux boxes running VirtualBox for Windows. Things to note, reverting to a saved state will lose ALL saved documents, files, etc. You need a link from Windows to a folder on Linux for your users so that important files aren't lost. There's another option to set up a 2nd HDD, which would be unaffected by reverting states, but I haven't done that - although the documentation is there. Because Photoshop and Lightroom are memory / performance hogs I'd set up a test linux partition and try it all out before committing. Depending on your needs for Linux a nice lightweight desktop instead of Gnome or KDE would be a smart move for the box running Photoshop. Good luck.

Comment: Re:Your math is wrong, or you are a driving hazard (Score 1) 206

by Mark_Uplanguage (#33779004) Attached to: EVs In the Spotlight At West Coast Green Conference
I can and have done the drive from NJ to FL many times - 900 miles in 14-15 hours (no big deal when you have 2 drivers). In any event, the problem statement was that the recharge time is currently so long that you need a place to sleep so that there's actually enough time to charge the car. People make trips like this all the time, not 10 times a year, but a ton of people drive to college or home, go to visit family, etc. So it's either I need 2 cars, or I have to rent a car for the long trip because I spent all of my money on an EV i.e. they aren't cheap.

In any event, there's no need to think these hurdles won't be overcome, it's just a problem right now. Early adopters are what makes things affordable for the rest of us down the line.

Timmy O'Riley By L. Hadron and the Colliders 62

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the shameless-self-promotion dept.
Making music has never been quite this awesome! Using only ThinkGeek products (Bliptronic 5000, Guitar Shirt, Drumkit Shirt, Stylophone, and Otamatone Electronic Instrument) the ultra-geeks over at ThinkGeek have created this ultra-cool cover of The Who's Baba O'Reilly. This also qualifies as a full blown shameless plug since ThinkGeek shares a corporate overlord with Slashdot.
Science

Aussie Scientists Find Coconut-Carrying Octopus 205

Posted by timothy
from the concealed-carry-in-australian-waters dept.
An anonymous reader writes with this excerpt from an AP report: "Australian scientists have discovered an octopus in Indonesia that collects coconut shells for shelter — unusually sophisticated behavior that the researchers believe is the first evidence of tool use in an invertebrate animal. The scientists filmed the veined octopus, Amphioctopus marginatus, selecting halved coconut shells from the sea floor, emptying them out, carrying them under their bodies up to 65 feet (20 meters), and assembling two shells together to make a spherical hiding spot. ... 'I was gobsmacked,' said Finn, a research biologist at the museum who specializes in cephalopods. 'I mean, I've seen a lot of octopuses hiding in shells, but I've never seen one that grabs it up and jogs across the sea floor. I was trying hard not to laugh.'"
Music

Student Orchestra Performs Music With iPhones 65

Posted by samzenpus
from the there's-a-symphonic-app-for-that dept.
A course at the University of Michigan ends with a live concert featuring students using iPhones as instruments. “Building a Mobile Phone Ensemble“ teaches students to code musical instruments for the iPhone, using the Apple-provided software-development kit. Georg Essl, assistant professor of computer science and music, says, "What’s interesting is we blend the whole process. We start from nothing. We teach the programming of iPhones for multimedia stuff, and then we teach students to build their own instruments.”
Image

Inventor Builds Robot Wife 469

Posted by samzenpus
from the you-lonely-lonely-man dept.
Inventor Le Trung must really like the book "The Stepford Wives," because he has built the dream of every lonely man without hope, a robot wife. Le's wife, Aiko, starts the day by reading him the newspaper headlines and they go for a drives in the countryside. Le says his relationship with Aiko hasn't strayed into the bedroom, but a few tweaks could turn her into a sexual partner, even redesigning her to have a simulated orgasm. *Shudder*
Books

Reading Guide To AI Design & Neural Networks? 266

Posted by kdawson
from the open-the-library-doors-hal dept.
Raistlin84 writes "I'm a PhD student in theoretical physics who's recently gotten quite interested in AI design. During my high school days, I spent most of my spare time coding various stuff, so I have a good working knowledge of some application programming languages (C/C++, Pascal/Delphi, Assembler) and how a computer works internally. Recently, I was given the book On Intelligence, where Jeff Hawkins describes numerous interesting ideas on how one would actually design a brain. As I have no formal background in computer science, I would like to broaden my knowledge in the direction of neural networks, pattern recognition, etc., but don't really know where to start reading. Due to my background, I figure that the 'abstract' theory would be mostly suited for me, so I would like to ask for a few book suggestions or other directions."

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