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Submission + - Bug in the GnuTLS Library leaves many OSs and Apps at risk (arstechnica.com)

williamyf writes: According to our friends at ArsTechnica:

"The bug in the GnuTLS library makes it trivial for attackers to bypass secure sockets layer (SSL) and Transport Layer Security (TLS) protections available on websites that depend on the open source package. Initial estimates included in Internet discussions such as this one indicate that more than 200 different operating systems or applications rely on GnuTLS to implement crucial SSL and TLS operations, but it wouldn't be surprising if the actual number is much higher. Web applications, e-mail programs, and other code that use the library are vulnerable to exploits that allow attackers monitoring connections to silently decode encrypted traffic passing between end users and servers."

What's even more, the coding error *may* have been present since 2005, so one has to wander, again, where were those "many eyes that render all bugs shallow" one keeps hearing about...

Submission + - Adobe Compromised; All Your Codes Belong to Us (krebsonsecurity.com)

sl4shd0rk writes: Adobe Systems Inc. is expected to announce today that hackers broke into its network and stole source code for an as-yet undetermined number of software titles, including its ColdFusion Web application platform, and possibly its Acrobat family of products. The company said hackers also accessed nearly three million customer credit card records, and stole login data for an undetermined number of Adobe user accounts.

Submission + - Microsoft Gives Zero-Days to Feds First? (techdirt.com)

ThatsNotPudding writes: Before telling anyone of zero-day exploits they find, Microsoft — allegedly — gives them to the Federales first. Not that the organs of state security would make hay while the sun is up, oh no.

Submission + - CERN's LHC Shut for 2 years (paritynews.com)

hypnosec writes: CERN has announced that the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been shut down as planned and will remain turned off till 2015 so that it can go through repairs and vital maintenance can be performed. The LHC has been operational for three years in a row and has generated huge amounts of research data and has led to ground-breaking discoveries like the Higgs Boson. The planned maintenance will foresee repairs following which the collider will be capable of operating at higher speeds.

Submission + - Adobe trolls slick dealers (forbes.com)

BenJeremy writes: This morning, lots of bargain hunters awoke to great news: Adobe was offering their Creative Suite 2 for free, just for registering an Adobe account! Download links and serial numbers on Adobe's web site seemed to confirm the news, as "hot deal" sites and even Forbes published the news. The plug was pulled a few hours later as horrified Adobe employees discovered they had inadvertently exposed a web page intended to help Adobe customers (who were already licensed) deal with activation servers that Adobe shut down on December 15.

One would hope Adobe would simply say "we meant to do that, here you go, have fun with the old version of Creative Suite and consider purchasing a newer version" but it doesn't look like they will do that.

Submission + - Amazon Debuts Kindle Paperwhite, Kindle Fire HD (slashdot.org)

Nerval's Lobster writes: "Amazon used a Sept. 6 event in California to debut a range of products, including a backlit Kindle e-reader with a higher-resolution screen, an updated Kindle Fire, and the new Kindle Fire HD in two screen sizes.

First, Bezos showed off a new version of the Kindle e-reader, the Kindle Paperwhite, complete with a backlit, higher-resolution screen (221 pixels-per-inch and 25 percent more contrast, according to Amazon). The device weighs 7.5 ounces and is 9.1mm thin; battery life is rated at eight weeks, and the screen brightness is adjustable.

He then showed off the updated Kindle Fire, before moving to the Kindle Fire HD, which features a choice of 7-inch or 8.9-inch screens, dual stereo speakers with Dolby Digital Plus, two antennas for better WiFi pickup, and a Texas Instruments OMAP 4470 processor (which Bezos claimed could out-perform the Tegra 3).

The Kindle Fire HD’s 7-inch version will retail for $199 and ship Sept. 14, while the 8.9-inch version will cost $299 and ship Nov. 20. An 8.9-inch, 4G LTE-enabled version with 32GB storage will be available starting Nov. 20 for $499, paired with a $49.99-a-year data plan."

Submission + - Google's Marissa Mayer becomes Yahoo CEO (nytimes.com)

D H NG writes: Marissa Mayer, Google's employee #20 and Vice President of Local, was appointed CEO of Yahoo. She was Google's public face for years, famously being responsible for the look and feel of Google’s most popular products: the famously unadorned white search homepage, Gmail, Google News and Google Images. Mayer resigned from Google Monday afternoon and will begin her new job on Tuesday.

Submission + - The Physics of Spilled Coffee (sciencemag.org)

sciencehabit writes: Physicists have shown that everyday mug sizes produce natural frequencies that just happen to match those of a person's leg movements during walking. This means that walking alone, without any other interference, is tuned to drive coffee to oscillate in a mug. But the researchers also found that even small irregularities in a person's walking are important: These amplify the wilder oscillations, or sloshing, which bumps up the chance of a spillage.

Submission + - Gunther von Hagens Creates an 'Anatomical Safari' (livescience.com)

Cazekiel writes: Gunther von Hagens, famous for his 'Body Worlds' exhibition has created an 'Anatomical Safari' exhibit for the Museum of Natural History in London. Instead of focusing on the human body as he'd done in 'Body Worlds', he displays what's underneath the skin of animals. From elephants to ostriches, each image featured in livescience.com's image gallery documenting the exhibit is fascinating.

According to the museum's exhibition developer, Georgina Bishop, "At Animal Inside Out, visitors will see animals close up in a whole new way and in the most amazing detail as they get under the skin of some of nature's most incredible creatures."


Submission + - Yahoo Layoffs Begin, CEO Sends Employees Apologetic Letter (ibtimes.com)

redletterdave writes: "As expected, Yahoo began laying off more than 2,000 employees on Wednesday morning — roughly 14 percent of the company's total workforce — in its effort to slim down and pivot its focus in a new direction. The mass layoff marks the sixth time in four years — and under three different CEOs, no less — that Yahoo has dumped employees, but this one will the company's biggest in its 17-year history. Scott Thompson, Yahoo's CEO, sent an apologetic letter to all his employees this morning explaining the changes."

Submission + - Hobbit Pub saved by actors Stephen Fry and Sir Ian McKellen (bbc.co.uk)

Fluffeh writes: "Recently the Hobbit Pub in England was sued for rights infringement which was covered right here, but it seems that Stephen Fry and Sir Ian McKellen are going to pony up the cash to keep the pub alive as reported by the BBC. Landlady Stella Roberts said she had been shocked by the actors' offer. She said: "I had a telephone call on Saturday evening, while we were trading, from Stephen Fry's business partner and manager. That's when he told me. I was very shocked. They've said as soon as they finish filming they would like to come down and visit the pub." However Ms Roberts said she was not celebrating just yet. She added: "Until everything is in black and white, on paper, we're going to be a bit reserved because it could be $100 this year and $20,000 next year.""

"Free markets select for winning solutions." -- Eric S. Raymond