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Comment: Re:I guess that makes sense (Score 2) 203

by Man of E (#40130091) Attached to: The Gamification of Hiring

There is a startup called Hire Art http://www.hireart.com/ that's doing something similar without the "gamification". Instead of playing a game like in the article, or going to the other extreme and requiring full-scale work samples, they have smaller-scale tests related to the required skills, including reading comprehension, basic numeracy/statistics, and more technical tests. An employer can choose modules and put together a short test to identify the skills they're looking for. Some tests can be graded automatically, and others are reviewed by humans.

The method in the article is tricky, because creating games for specific jobs is going to be quite time-consuming and psychologically complex. These games are good for hiring bartenders, but what if you want to hire drivers, or data-entry staff, or IT professionals? All different skills and you can't expect to know every business as well as the hiring manager.

So the HireArt approach seems like a good middle ground me: the tests are a slight barrier to the applicant so they don't send millions of copies of their resume hoping to "get lucky" on a job that isn't a match; anyone qualified shouldn't have trouble passing. Meanwhile, both the employer and applicant get a chance to make a first impression without taking too much of each others' time.

From what I hear, it seems to be working quite well so far. Applicants who get interviews are more likely to be good fits.

Disclosure: I know one of the company's founders

The Courts

Encryption Passphrase Protected by the 5th Amendment 537

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the my-password-is-password dept.
Takichi writes "A federal judge in Vermont has ruled that prosecutors can't force the defendant to divulge his PGP passphrase. The ruling was given on the basis that the passphrase is protected under the 5th amendment to the United States Constitution (protection against self-incrimination)." The question comes down to, is your password the contents of your brain, or the keys to a safe.
The Courts

IFPI Domain Dispute Likely to Go To Court 90

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the big-shock-here dept.
fgaliegue writes "Ars Technica has a follow-up on the ifpi.com domain takeover by The Pirate Bay. The International Federation of the Phonographic Industry, ifpi.org, is quite unhappy that the .com is now a link to the (still not live) International Federation of Pirates Interests. The ifpi.com domain has been free as soon as March of this year, according to WebArchive. Nevertheless, the "real" IFPI wants to take it to the WIPO under the accusation of cybersquatting."
Desktops (Apple)

The Next-Gen iMac With Brushed Aluminum In August? 252

Posted by CowboyNeal
from the new-and-improved dept.
Alfaresy writes "As previously reported by Degadget back on June 19th, the iMac update due this summer and is expected to be available in 20- and 24-inch versions, while the 17-inch version set to be discontinued. Apple's next iMac revision is currently tracking for release in August, and will have a brushed aluminum enclosure with measure just 2-inch thick, according to ThinkSecret's sources. Furthermore, ThinkSecret's sources say, "The elegant new enclosure will somewhat resemble the current white iMac but is said to feature a shorter space below the actual display, where most of the internals are housed." The upcoming iMacs are expected to be based on Intel's Santa Rosa platform with speeds to reach the highest point at 2.4GHz."
Media

+ - Discrimination against atheists on CNN

Submitted by
Anonymous Coward
Anonymous Coward writes "On January 31st, as part of a longer series on discimination, CNN's Paula Zahn show did a topic on discrimination against atheists. After a short prerecorded segment about two families' experiences, the show came back for a live panel discussion where opinions ranged from 'they just need to shut up' to 'they and others just need to shut up.' The bigotry was so bad even Paula Zahn was taken aback — "Are any of you going to defend them here tonight?" The flood of angry emails has prompted CNN to redo the segment on Monday night, 2/12 (Darwin Day !), this time with a balanced panel."

Breakdown Forces New Look At Mars Mission Sexuality 528

Posted by Zonk
from the acting-like-adults-at-nasa dept.
FloatsomNJetsom writes "Popular Mechanics has up an interesting story, discussing what the long-term implications of the Lisa Nowak incident could mean for Mars Mission crew decisions: With a 30-month roundtrip, that isn't the sort of thing you'd want to happen in space. Scientists have been warning about the problems of sex on long-term spaceflight, and experts are divided as to whether you want a crew of older married couples, or asexual unitard-wearing eunuchs. The point the article makes specifically is that NASA's current archetype of highly-driven, task-oriented people might be precisely the wrong type for a Mars expedition. In addition scientists may use genomics or even functional MRI in screening astronauts, in addition to facial-recognition computers to monitor mental health during the mission." Maybe observers could just deploy the brain scanner to keep track of them?
Announcements

+ - Video Games = Good Self Esteem?

Submitted by
njkid1
njkid1 writes "The whole video-games-for-good concept sounds so appealing — especially since most normal people don't want to work in an industry that gets blamed for causing all the ills in modern society. (Granted, most people who say that about video games use it as an easy political platform to gain voter confidence, et al). We've been clinging to Nintendo's Brain Age as official proof that gaming is good — now we can add Mind Habits Booster to our do-gooder list. http://www.gamedailyxl.com/2007/02/08/video-games- good-self-esteem?&ncid=AOLGAM000500000000009"
Music

EMI May Sell Entire Collection as DRM-less MP3s 188

Posted by Zonk
from the and-away-we-go dept.
BobbyJo writes "According to the Chicago Sun-Times, EMI has been pitching the possibility of selling its entire music collection to the public in MP3 form ... without Digital Rights Management protections. According to the article, several other major music companies have considered this same route, but none as far as EMI. The reasons, of course, have nothing to do with taking a moral stand; EMI wants to compete with Apple. 'The London-based EMI is believed to have held talks with a wide range of online retailers that compete with Apple's iTunes. Those competing retailers include RealNetworks Inc., eMusic.com, MusicNet Inc. and Viacom Inc.'s MTV Networks. People familiar with the matter cautioned that EMI could still abandon the proposed strategy before implementing it. A decision about whether to keep pursuing the idea could come as soon as today.'"
Math

Statistical Accuracy of Internet Weather Forecasts 189

Posted by CowboyNeal
from the betting-men dept.
markmcb writes "Brandon Hansen considers the statistical accuracy of popular on-line weather forecast sources and shows who's on target, and on who you probably shouldn't rely. Motivated by a trip to a water park that was spoiled with hail despite a 'clear sky' forecast, he does a nice job of depicting deviations, averages, and overall accuracy in a manner that stats junkies are sure to love."
Windows

Windows Expert Jumps Ship 939

Posted by kdawson
from the hello-apple dept.
An anonymous reader writes to let us know that Scott Finnie, Computerworld's Windows expert, has given the final verdict to Windows after 3 months of using a Mac. And the verdict is: "Sayonara." Finnie is known to readers here for his many reviews of Vista as it progressed to release. Quoting: "If you give the Mac three months, as I did, you won't go back either. The hardest part is paying for it — everything after that gets easier and easier. Perhaps fittingly, it took me the full three-month trial period to pay off my expensive MacBook Pro. But the darn thing is worth every penny."
Security

University Professor Chastised For Using Tor 623

Posted by kdawson
from the control-freaks-ascendent dept.
Irongeek_ADC writes with a first-person account from the The Chronicle of Higher Education by a university professor who was asked to stop using Tor. University IT and campus security staffers came knocking on Paul Cesarini's door asking why he was using the anonymizing network. They requested that he stop and also that he not teach his students about it. The visitors said it was likely against university policy (a policy they probably were not aware that Cesarini had helped to draft). The professor seems genuinely to appreciate the problems that a campus IT department faces; but in the end he took a stand for academic freedom.

Machines certainly can solve problems, store information, correlate, and play games -- but not with pleasure. -- Leo Rosten

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