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Comment: Re:Won't work for long... (Score 1) 62

by Mal-2 (#49598847) Attached to: Game:ref's Hardware Solution To Cheating In eSports

Depends on the game. For some games, the skill is all about quickly executing certain key combinations, for others it involves elements of timing. For others, that include a lot of scripting hooks just so you can make common things easier, they don't want you going overboard and writing complex interactions that do conditionally respond to stuff.

That still won't stop anyone. Write a macro that gets you to a conditional branch, then two or three or however many more you need based on the situation faced. "Oh, it's going THAT way, better use the Blue layer."

I'm not an elite gamer, and I never will be, but I do like my particular flavor of hardware. If you as an organizer were to tell me I had to use the same Razer Black Widow as you're saddling everyone else with, I'd be saying "no thanks, can I get my entry fee back?" because I don't even use QWERTY, or a staggered layout for that matter. I use a tweaked Dvorak layout in a rectilinear matrix, with my cursor pad on the left. It also happens to have 32 leftover keys for programming (41 if I want to fill every available space at the cost of comfort). I can add another 30 macros in the form of the Xkeys 16 strip I paid way too much for a few years back. Telling me I can't use these would be very similar to saying I couldn't use a mouse with twelve thumb buttons – which can also be used for macros. (I don't, I actually have just a six-button mouse and use the thumb buttons as modifiers, but I wouldn't complain about someone who did.)

Comment: Re:Won't work for long... (Score 1) 62

by Mal-2 (#49597965) Attached to: Game:ref's Hardware Solution To Cheating In eSports

However, keyboards and keyboard converters are easily available which can do macros in the hardware.

Soarer's. Blue Cube. Tipro. Cherry G86 (and even some G80 and G81). Xkeys. All hardware-programmable (and that's just off the top of my head). Even if you can detect the use of "illegal macro software", what about the hardware options?

Which makes me ask, what the hell is an "illegal macro" anyhow? If something is so predictable that it can be scripted and bound to a single key, then it shouldn't really take multiple presses of a key to do it in the first place. This is not just limited to games, it extends to all software where I want to do a single, moderately tortuous task efficiently and often.

Comment: Re:That escalated quickly (Score 1) 102

by Mal-2 (#49595793) Attached to: Climatologist Speaks On the Effects of Geoengineering

I would agree that particular scenario is unlikely. I was just making the point that there may be a conflict between what is best on a local scale and what is best on a global scale, and there may even be severally equally flawed proposals which apportion the damage differently. The ones taking the brunt of the pain aren't going to be overly sympathetic, even if it needs doing.

Comment: Re:That escalated quickly (Score 4, Insightful) 102

by Mal-2 (#49595715) Attached to: Climatologist Speaks On the Effects of Geoengineering

The two of you hopefully agree that your interests are aligned, however.

What happens if the Russian plan for reducing temperature means a return of Dust Bowl conditions in the Great Plains of North America, and they start doing it unilaterally? You don't see how that could lead to a rapid escalation with Mr. "I'll nuke before I give Crimea back" Putin?

Comment: Relying on MS for core functions? (Score 1) 208

by Mal-2 (#49581013) Attached to: IBM CIO Thinks Agile Development Might Save Company

Is it really so smart to rely on Skype, a Microsoft holding, for internal operations? I would assume they have the capability to listen in to whatever they like, and would certainly not want to use Skype to transact business that is in direct competition to another one of their divisions. This is above and beyond the fact that the Feds will be able to listen in, since there is only so much they can do to avoid that anyhow.

Comment: Re:7.7 mohs hardness? (Score 1) 245

by Mal-2 (#49579473) Attached to: Breakthough Makes Transparent Aluminum Affordable

Version numbers are arbitrary, I never said they weren't. Yes, the decimal is a divider and not a mathematical decimal, so 5.10 comes after 5.9 where it can't in the hardness scale. I never said anything about "half the new features". In fact I'd a expect large gap between the last 5.x and 6.0 and not assume the version numbers meant anything in regards to the actual quantity of features, only about their timing. That is, if a feature is introduced in 5.2, it's probably still going to be there in 5.5 (unless it was fundamentally broken and had to be yanked).

The decimals on the Mohs scale seem arbitrary as well, but that does not make them meaningless. If you have just one substance between 7 and 8, you could justifiably call it 7.5, but what do you do if it turns out that everything else between 7 and 8 scratches it? You downgrade it to 7.1, that's what. These are like old BASIC line numbers where you assign them in the hopes that you don't have to change any later because of things you plug in, but sometimes you're wrong.

Comment: Re:7.7 mohs hardness? (Score 1) 245

by Mal-2 (#49577577) Attached to: Breakthough Makes Transparent Aluminum Affordable

It is also comparing things to OTHER things that fall between the two points. Something is not just "between 7 and 8", it is also harder than some other materials "between 7 and 8" and softer than others. The number after the decimal allows for them to be rankedrelative to one another. What you're saying is that just because the code base of Software 5.0 and 5.1 are largely the same there is no way to distinguish between them, and that everything in the 5.x line except 5.0 itself is merely "between 5 and 6".

Comment: Child car seats. (Score 1) 140

by Mal-2 (#49568741) Attached to: New Privacy Threat: Automated Vehicle Occupancy Detection

One potential problem I see (it happens already) is people being ticketed for driving solo, when in fact they have a baby in the car with them. You might not feel they should be in the HOV lane because that baby would never be out driving by itself, therefore they aren't saving any congestion, but it does meet the letter of the law. It also isn't going to be easily picked up on a camera. These people already get pulled over (and released) by cops who can't see the passenger in back. What is going to happen when an automated ticket shows up in the mail? You don't think the system is going to give them the benefit of the doubt, do you? If you do, please pass me some of what you're smoking, Pollyanna.

Comment: Re:Money (Score 1) 140

by Mal-2 (#49568663) Attached to: New Privacy Threat: Automated Vehicle Occupancy Detection

In reality they just eat up a lane of traffic that could otherwise be used to alleviate rush hour congestion. It might be different if they actually ADDED HOV lanes instead of taking one of the normal lanes and rebranding it.

Uh, in many places they have done just that. I don't know how common it is, but I've been to a number of places in the US where the HOV lanes are even added as completely separate lanes from the rest of traffic, and I recall when one was constructed as such -- added into what was previously the wide median area of a highway.

That's how it often is around here, although they did have to shift (and in some cases narrow) the other lanes a bit to make what used to be the shoulder wide enough for a lane. Part of the result is that you end up with two wheels constantly floating across the seams in the construction that were designed to be hidden between lanes rather than within them. They should have shifted things over a full half-lane so at least we'd be completely straddling the breaks.

Comment: Re:Since when (Score 5, Informative) 629

by Mal-2 (#49561223) Attached to: Pepsi To Stop Using Aspartame

Since when is Sucralose better than Aspartame?

Ask someone with phenylketonuria. I once went to a restaurant with a group, one of whom has this disorder. When he ordered a drink, he specifically said "NOT diet, I can't have phenylalanine". They brought him Diet Coke. He drank enough that some time (maybe twenty minutes) later, he had a freak-out and would have gotten all of us tossed out if he hadn't had enough sense to explain to us what he thought was about to happen. The restaurant quickly reversed tack to make sure they weren't going to get sued, while one of the people in the group had to drive him to a hospital to make sure he'd be OK.

Comment: Re:That's a...polite...way to put it. (Score 1) 173

by Mal-2 (#49504241) Attached to: FBI Overstated Forensic Hair Matches In Nearly All Trials Before 2000

Again, misleading does not necessarily mean they knew it to be untrue. They could have bought into the propaganda themselves.

Agent Smith sets up misleading guidelines setting a particularly low bar for matches on fingerprints, knowing what he's doing could net the wrong people. Agent Jones follows those guidelines and testifies on the assumption that they are sound. Both the court and Agent Jones have been misled, and Jones is not guilty of perjury. Smith did not testify, thus is not guilty of perjury either. A crime has probably been committed, it's just not perjury.

Comment: Re:That's a...polite...way to put it. (Score 1) 173

by Mal-2 (#49503589) Attached to: FBI Overstated Forensic Hair Matches In Nearly All Trials Before 2000

It's not perjury if you really believe it to be true. Merely being wrong is not enough. Being shown to be wrong may discredit a witness, but it does not in and of itself demonstrate perjury. Perjury requires intent.

If you were told that a match to a certain level of confidence is sufficient to make a case, and you testify that your samples matched to that level (because it turns out that's a very low bar), how is that perjury? Even if your initial assumption is wrong, you are reporting what you believe to be true.

Comment: Re:Would the abandoned spectrum be useful for data (Score 1) 293

by Mal-2 (#49503165) Attached to: Norway Will Switch Off FM Radio In 2017

There's nothing fundamentally different about the 88-108 MHz band compared to the 2 meter band (144-148) except that it has four times the bandwidth. Any transmission mode that works well at 2 meters will also work well in the FM band, as the propagation characteristics are substantially the same.

Disraeli was pretty close: actually, there are Lies, Damn lies, Statistics, Benchmarks, and Delivery dates.

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