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Comment: PlumpyNut (Score 4, Interesting) 239

by Major Blud (#49121467) Attached to: Study: Peanut Consumption In Infancy Helps Prevent Peanut Allergy

Back in 2007, Anderson Cooper asked a pediatrician if PlumpyNut (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plumpy%27nut) was affecting people in developing countries suffering from malnutrition with peanut allergies. The Dr. said "We just don't see it. In developing countries food allergy is not nearly the problem that it is in industrialized countries." Sounds like this study backs up that claim.

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/a-...

Comment: Re:Sigh. (Score 2) 125

by Major Blud (#49021225) Attached to: Netflix Now Available In Cuba

"The fact that you have talked about dissemination of culture in terms of 'doing business'"

The whole point of the embargo was to prevent US businesses from doing trade with Cuba. So the solution is to maintain it so that Cuban culture can be protected?

How has opening a Ford dealership in France or an Apple Store in Italy stifled their culture? Not much based off of the last visit I had. Do you expect this to be different for Cuba?

Besides, free speech and personal freedom are cultural attributes worth sharing, is it not? The implementation of this in the USA is debatable, but the best way to share those attributes is through exchange of ideas enabled through international trade and openness. The only other way is through armed conflict, and we can see how well that worked out in their past conflicts.

Comment: Re:Qualifications (Score 2) 479

by Major Blud (#48832729) Attached to: Fighting Tech's Diversity Issues Without Burning Down the System

"This is about RECRUITERS. They go out and find candidates."

This doesn't change what I said. In this case the recruiter is passing on qualified people just so they can hit a %20 quota. It's not like they have infinite candidates to begin with.....they may be limited to 100, or 50, or whatever. If there aren't enough qualified people to fill the candidate quota to begin with, they'll have to start reaching out to unqualified female candidates to fill that 20%.

And I did read the article thanks.

Comment: Re:Why didn't they take them alive? (Score 1) 490

by Major Blud (#48775797) Attached to: In Paris, Terrorists Kill 2 More, Take At Least 7 Hostages

Seems too risky. Non-lethal weapons aren't always reliable in these types of situations.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M...

If you wanted to hit someone with a "sleep dart" over 100 yards away, such a weapon would most certainly be no different than a bullet at closer range, making it potentially lethal anyways.

Not to mention that these guys were known to be heavily-armed, wore body armor, and had hostages. Better to take them out quickly than risk any more lives.

Byte your tongue.

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