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Comment: Re:Spectrum is measured in Hz? (Score 1) 91

by MagicM (#48941367) Attached to: US Wireless Spectrum Auction Raises $44.9 Billion

This threw me off too, because "65 million cycles per minute of spectrum" hurts my brain.

However, "spectrum" is defined as "frequency range", similarly to how you can talk about "temperature range". If today's high temperature is 70F (20C) degrees and the low temperature is 50F (10C) degrees, then today's temperature-range is 20F degrees or 10C degrees. To define the range you need to include the unit in which the end points of the range are measured.

I still want to call the temperature range "20 F-temperature-points" and the spectrum "65 Mhz-frequency-points", but maybe that's because I skipped lunch. I shouldn't skip lunch.

Technology

Four Facepalm Bugs In USPS Label-Printing Site 182

Posted by timothy
from the will-immediately-sell-my-stock-in-usps dept.
"The United States Postal Service "Click-N-Ship" site suffered no outages or slowdowns during Christmas rush," writes Bennett Haselton. "It just has bugs that make the process more annoying than just standing in line at the post office, which defeats the purpose. The most frustrating part is that most of these bugs could have been fixed, just by having some testers run through the ordering process and make a note of anything that seems confusing or wrong. (Although I've included notes on how to work around all the bugs, so you really can print your own labels and skip the line.)" Read on for the rest; what other gripes do you have about the current package delivery regime, and how would you resolve them?
Bitcoin

Bitstamp Bitcoin Exchange Suspended Due To "Compromised Wallet" 161

Posted by samzenpus
from the that-old-familiar-story dept.
twitnutttt writes Customers of Bistamp, the successor (until recently) to MtGox as the highest-volume dollar-denominated Bitcoin exchange, and still the preferred source of trading data for many technical analysts, sent an email at about 4:00 UTC today warning that, "Today our transaction processing server detected problems with our hot wallet and stopped processing withdrawals." They also instructed users to stop sending any deposits immediately or they may be lost. The Bitstamp website has now also suspended all exchange/trading services, and the homepage contains only a maintenance message warning users of a "compromised" wallet. Numerous references to security imply that this is a hacking attack, but Bitstamp reassures that they maintain "more than enough offline reserves to cover the compromised bitcoins."
Transportation

Why Didn't Sidecar's Flex Pricing Work? 190

Posted by samzenpus
from the you-get-what-you-pay-for dept.
Bennett Haselton writes Sidecar is a little-known alternative to Lyft and Uber, deployed in only ten cities so far, which lets drivers set their own prices to undercut other ride-sharing services. Given that most amateur drivers would be willing to give someone a ride for far less than the rider would be willing to pay, why didn't the flex-pricing option take off? Keep reading to see what Bennet has to say.
Twitter

Twitter Should Use Random Sample Voting For Abuse Reports 132

Posted by samzenpus
from the tell-us-everything dept.
Bennett Haselton writes: Twitter has announced new protocols for filing and handling abuse reports, making it easier to flag specific types of content (e.g. violence or suicide threats). But with the volume of abusive tweets being reported to the company every day, the internal review process will always be a bottleneck. The company could handle more abuse reports properly by recruiting public volunteers. Read what Bennett thinks below.
Cloud

Clarificiation on the IP Address Security in Dropbox Case 152

Posted by samzenpus
from the read-all-about-it dept.
Bennett Haselton writes A judge rules that a county has to turn over the IP addresses that were used to access a county mayor's Dropbox account, stating that there is no valid security-related reason why the IP addresses should be exempt from a public records request. I think the judge's conclusion about IP addresses was right, but the reasoning was flawed; here is a technically more correct argument that would have led to the same answer. Keep Reading to see what Bennett has to say about the case.
Math

Big Talk About Small Samples 246

Posted by samzenpus
from the read-all-about-it dept.
Bennett Haselton writes: My last article garnered some objections from readers saying that the sample sizes were too small to draw meaningful conclusions. (36 out of 47 survey-takers, or 77%, said that a picture of a black woman breast-feeding was inappropriate; while in a different group, 38 out of 54 survey-takers, or 70%, said that a picture of a white woman breast-feeding was inappropriate in the same context.) My conclusion was that, even on the basis of a relatively small sample, the evidence was strongly against a "huge" gap in the rates at which the surveyed population would consider the two pictures to be inappropriate. I stand by that, but it's worth presenting the math to support that conclusion, because I think the surveys are valuable tools when you understand what you can and cannot demonstrate with a small sample. (Basically, a small sample can present only weak evidence as to what the population average is, but you can confidently demonstrate what it is not.) Keep reading to see what Bennett has to say.

Comment: It's not Bennett Haselton (Score 1, Troll) 928

by MagicM (#48278743) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Can You Say Something Nice About Systemd?

I love systemd because it doesn't continuously spout inane drivel to my favorite news aggregator. When systemd has something to say, it does so in its own log separate file which I can read at my leisure (or ignore completely if I so choose). As far as I'm concerned, systemd is the model that should be followed by everyone.

This is now. Later is later.

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