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Classic Games (Games)

GOG.com Not Really Gone 276

Posted by samzenpus
from the stepped-out-for-a-minute dept.
gspr writes "On Sunday, Slashdot and many others reported that DRM-free games site GOG.com was shutting down. Now the site is back, revealing that it was all a hoax. According to the site: 'Now it's time we put an end to all the speculations once and for all. It's true that we decided that we couldn't keep GOG.com the way it was so we won't. As you probably know by now, GOG.com is entering its new era with an end of the two-years beta stage and we're launching a brand new GOG.com with new, huge releases.' So it was all an advertising stunt."

Comment: Oh I I feel so sorry for them (Score 5, Insightful) 137

by Mag7 (#31269962) Attached to: Aussie Film Industry Appeals ISP Copyright Case

an unworkable online environment for content creators and content providers

Boohoo. They wanted someone else to do their dirty work for them, but now they have to actually use the legal system as intended which requires a great deal more effort. Cry me a river that they don't get a short cut to justice.

Comment: Re:This will never happen. (Score 1) 183

by Mag7 (#29063307) Attached to: Australian ISPs Soon To Become Copyright Cops

Please lets vote Turnbull in, enough is enough (already)

If a Double Dissolution happens Turnbull (or another Lib, I doubt Turnbull could run) that might just happen, so long as no-one utters the words "work choices" they should get in.

You assume the majority of voters are concerned about this single issue. Most wouldn't even know there is an issue. Others honestly think filtering and stopping "pirates" (who fund terrorism, didn't you know) is a good idea that must be done by the government (think of the children!).

Nope, unfortunately the people who understand the pitfalls of both are vastly in the minority.

Comment: A little refreshing (Score 1) 142

by Mag7 (#29049571) Attached to: EA Looking Into Reviving Classic Games?

I have to say that's a refreshingly astute observation coming from a large entertainment corp, one that like so many entertainment companies so often takes the safe option of flogging a concept, genre or property to death.

In my experience he's right about revisiting old games. I've fired up a few of my old favourites, and still play some arcade games with MAME, but the memories and feelings of nostalgia almost always are far better than playing the actual game. Among other things, taste changes with age.

If they were to do this right, you could mix the nostalgia of your experience playing the old version with some of the best things of today's consoles or PCs, like new inputdev (wii anyone). Throw in some astute in jokes and tributes to elements of the original (remember how Day of the Tentacle had the full version of Maniac Mansion as an in game surprise) and you could have a winner.

Of course, we're all a bit jaded by bad experiences with remakes and sequels (and those god-awful prequels- you know the ones...)

Comment: Re:Green is Population Control (Score 1) 223

by Mag7 (#29006629) Attached to: Rival Green Groups Bid To Snatch .eco Domain

We have too many people on this planet as it is, and there's no good way to get them off the planet, the energy requirements are simply too great ...

Oh come on moderators! There isn't even a link in support of this wild claim (not even a lame one to a wikipedia article).

+1 insightful != +1 agree

At least attempt to unsure make claims based on some facts.

Yeah everybody, I know, this is slashdot. What a shame.

Power

Measuring the User For CPU Frequency Scaling 190

Posted by timothy
from the no-this-one-goes-in-your-mouth dept.
An anonymous reader writes "The Empathic Systems Project a Northwestern University demonstrate up to 50% power savings by controlling CPU frequency scaling based upon the end user. They measure the user with eye trackers, galvanic skin response, and force sensors to find a CPU frequency that the user is satisfied with. They are currently studying user activity and system performance on mobile architectures, specifically the Android G1 phone."
Security

A Cyber-Attack On an American City 461

Posted by timothy
from the if-by-one-day-you-mean-already dept.
Bruce Perens writes "Just after midnight on Thursday, April 9, unidentified attackers climbed down four manholes in the Northern California city of Morgan Hill and cut eight fiber cables in what appears to have been an organized attack on the electronic infrastructure of an American city. Its implications, though startling, have gone almost un-reported. So I decided to change that."
Transportation

Cornell Grad Students Go Ballooning (Again) 58

Posted by timothy
from the ithaca-is-gorges dept.
ballooner writes "A group of Cornell University graduate students are attempting to break the Amateur Radio Ballooning duration record this weekend. The project is a continuation from last year when some other Cornell grad students broke the altitude record. The progress of the team can be tracked via their Twitter feed or by monitoring their APRS beacons. For all the HAMs out there, downlinks are available on a 30m wavelength, too."
Science

Unzipping Nanotubes Makes Superfast Electronics 64

Posted by samzenpus
from the greased-lightning dept.
Al writes "Two research groups have found a way to unzip carbon nanotubes to create nanoribbons of graphene — a material that has shown great promise for use as nanoscale transistors, but which has proven difficult to manufacture previously. A team led by James Tour, a professor of chemistry and computer science at Rice University, and another led by Hongjie Dai, a professor of chemistry at Stanford University, both figured out ways to slice carbon nanotubes open to create the nanoribbons. The Stanford team was funded by Intel, and the Rice group is in talks with several companies about commercializing their approach."
Encryption

Build an Open Source SSL Accelerator 136

Posted by timothy
from the macguyver-it-up dept.
Amin Zelfani writes "SSL accelerators like Big-IP 6900 from F5 Networks typically carry a $50k or more price tag. An article over at o3magazine.com shows you how to build an SSL accelerator that's on par with the commercial solutions, using Open Source projects. SSL Accelerators offload the encryption / decryption process from web servers, reducing load and reducing the number of certificates needed."

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