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Comment: Re:Dial up can still access gmail (Score 5, Informative) 317

... most viruses require a constant high speed connection...

You must be new here - I'm young in internet years, but even I remember the number of viruses flying around in the days of floppy disks and dial-up modems, long before constant high speed connections...

+ - Apple Outrages Users by "Automatically" Installing U2's Album on their Devices 3

Submitted by Zanadou
Zanadou (1043400) writes "Apple may have succeeded at breaking two records at once with the free release of U2’s latest album, titled Songs of Innocence, via iTunes. But now, it looks like it’s also on track to become one of the worst music publicity stunts of all time.

Users who have opted to download new purchases to their iPhones automatically have found the new U2 album sitting on their phones. But even if iTunes users hadn’t chosen automatic downloads, Songs of Innocence will still be displayed as an “iTunes in the Cloud” purchase. That means it will still be shown as part of your music library, even if you delete all the tracks. The only way to make the U2 album go away is to go to your Mac or PC and hide all of your “iTunes in the Cloud” purchases, or to use iTunes to manually hide each track from your purchased items list.

Other reactions include rapper, Tyler, The Creator, saying that having the new U2 album automatically downloaded on his iPhone was 'like waking up with herpes', while Twitter user Mez pondered 'If Apple can forcefully download a U2 album onto everyone's phone, imagine what else they can do.. and see.'"

+ - Hewlett-Packard pleads guilty to Bribery->

Submitted by Charliemopps
Charliemopps (1157495) writes "Hewlett-Packard and three subsidiaries pleaded guilty Thursday to paying bribes to foreign officials in Russia, Mexico and Poland and agreed to pay $108 million in criminal and regulatory penalties. For over 10 years Hewlett-Packard kept 2 sets of books to track slush-funds they used to bribe government officials for favorable contracts."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:SSDs will outpace platter drives (Score 4, Interesting) 296

by Mad Merlin (#47867269) Attached to: WD Announces 8TB, 10TB Helium Hard Drives

With a fraction of the energy usage, densities increasing, and hopefully a reversal in the recent trend towards less durability, SSDs will probably also overtake platter drives in price per terabyte within 5 years.

It's not so much a trend as it is an unavoidable problem with increasing densities of SSDs. As you shrink the process size to fit more stuff in the same space, the durability goes down. As you change from SLC to MLC to TLC to fit more stuff in the same space, durability goes down. Substantial technological advances will be required to produce a 20T SSD with both acceptable durability and cost.

In comparison, shortscreen monitors (often mislabeled as widescreen) are a trend which has no logical or technical underpinning.

+ - E-Books on a $20 cell phone->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Moon+ Pro Reader, FBReader, Kindle, you name it--many popular Android e-book apps can run on a smartphone available for $20 and shipping.

The trick is to respect the device’s limits and keep down the number of apps you install. This fun isn't for eager multitaskers.

On the bright side, the $20 phone can do Acapela TTS, includes a 4GB memory card and works with cards of up to 32GB--easily enough for scads of pre-loaded books. Plus, the WiFi is great. And the screen of 3.2 inches isn’t that much smaller than the 3.5 inchers on the older iPads.

What could cell phone e-reading mean in the many "book deserts" of the U.S.? And how about the U.K. where miserly pols are closing libraries even though the Guardian says "a third of UK children do not own a single book and three-quarters claim never to read outside school"?

The smartphone post on the LibraryCity site tells how librarians and others could start "cell phone book clubs" to promote the discovery and absorption of books as well as smarter use of technology."

Link to Original Source

+ - Law Enforcement Tool Used to Hack Apple's iCloud

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "A Wired article published on Tuesday reports that the software used by hackers to recently obtain nude photographs of female celebrities was actually developed for law enforcement and government agencies. The source of the revelation is the web forum Anon-IB, where "hackers openly discuss using a piece of software called EPPB or Elcomsoft Phone Password Breaker to download their victims' data from iCloud backups." EPPB is sold by forensics firm Elcomsoft with no requirement for "proof of law enforcement or other government credentials." The software does not utilize a backdoor but was instead developed through Elcomsoft fully reverse engineering "Apple's protocol for communicating between iCloud and its iOS devices.""

+ - Firefox 32 Arrives With New HTTP Cache, Public Key Pinning Support

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Mozilla today officially launched Firefox 32 for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Android. Additions include a new HTTP cache for improved performance, public key pinning support, and easy language switching on Android. Firefox 32 has been released over on Firefox.com and all existing users should be able to upgrade to it automatically. As always, the Android version is trickling out slowly on Google Play. Changelogs are here: desktop and mobile."

+ - Limiting the teaching of the scientific process in Ohio->

Submitted by frdmfghtr
frdmfghtr (603968) writes "Over at Ars Technica, there's a story about a bill in the Ohio legislature that wants to downplay the teaching of the scientific process. From the article:
"Specifically prohibiting a discussion of the scientific process is a recipe for educational chaos. To begin with, it leaves the knowledge the kids will still receive—the things we have learned through science—completely unmoored from any indication of how that knowledge was generated or whether it's likely to be reliable. The scientific process is also useful in that it can help people understand the world around them and the information they're bombarded with; it can also help people assess the reliability of various sources of information.""

Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:I'm open to it (Score 1) 826

by stoborrobots (#47755147) Attached to: Choose Your Side On the Linux Divide

Monolithic?

Postgresql runs a database server. That's it. Postgresql doesn't include a mailserver just because it needs to send alerts.

Apache runs an HTTP server. That's it. Apache doesn't include DNS and OCSP servers just because sites hosted on it will need name resolution and certificates.

OpenOffice, I'll give you that one. It combines multiple applications into one for historical reasons. I don't like it, but I don't use it so I don't have a dog in that fight.

Monolithic (in the sense used here) implies the combination of multiple essentially independent functions into a single application. Just because Apache and Postgresql are big applications doesn't make them monolithic.

+ - UPS: We've Been Hacked->

Submitted by paysonwelch
paysonwelch (2505012) writes "The United Parcel Service announced Wednesday that customersâ(TM) credit and debit card information at 51 franchises in 24 states may have been compromised. There are 4,470 franchised center locations throughout the U.S., according to UPS.

The malware began to infiltrate the system as early as January 20, but the majority of the attacks began after March 26. UPS says the threat was eliminated as of August 11 and that customers can shop safely at all locations."

Link to Original Source

"Who cares if it doesn't do anything? It was made with our new Triple-Iso-Bifurcated-Krypton-Gate-MOS process ..."

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