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Submission + - SF Says AdWare Bundled with Gimp Is Intentional-> 5 5

tresf writes: In response to a Google+ post from the Gimp project claiming that "[Sourceforge] is now distributing an ads-enabled installer of GIMP", Sourceforge had this response:

In cases where a project is no longer actively being maintained, SourceForge has in some cases established a mirror of releases that are hosted elsewhere. This was done for GIMP-Win.

Editor's note: Gimp is actively being maintained and the definition of "mirror" is quite misleading here as a modified binary is no longer a verbatim copy. Download statistics for Gimp on Windows show SourceForge as offering over 1,000 downloads per day of the Gimp software. In an official response to this incident, the official Gimp project team reminds users to use official download methods. Slashdotters may remember the last time news like this surfaced (2013) when the Gimp team decided to move downloads from SourceForge to their own FTP service.

Therefore, we remind you again that GIMP only provides builds for Windows via its official Downloads page.

Note: SourceForge and Slashdot share a corporate parent.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - Sourceforge staff takes over a user's account and wraps their software installer-> 11 11

An anonymous reader writes: Sourceforge staff took over the account of the GIMP-for-Windows maintainer claiming it was abandoned and used this opportunity to wrap the installer in crapware. Quoting Ars:

SourceForge, the code repository site owned by Slashdot Media, has apparently seized control of the account hosting GIMP for Windows on the service, according to e-mails and discussions amongst members of the GIMP community—locking out GIMP's lead Windows developer. And now anyone downloading the Windows version of the open source image editing tool from SourceForge gets the software wrapped in an installer replete with advertisements.


Link to Original Source

Submission + - SourceForge (owned by Slashdot Media) installs ads with GIMP-> 5 5

careysb writes: SourceForge, the code repository site owned by Slashdot Media, has apparently seized control of the account hosting GIMP for Windows on the service, according to e-mails and discussions amongst members of the GIMP community—locking out GIMP's lead Windows developer. And now anyone downloading the Windows version of the open source image editing tool from SourceForge gets the software wrapped in an installer replete with advertisements.
Link to Original Source

Comment Completely out of context, not the intent (Score 1) 303 303

While I wasn't at ChefConf this year, I know several people who attended this discussion. By selective quoting, the 'reporter' has completely misrepresented the statement.

The contextually mangled quote used in the article: "“t’s definitely possible,” Russinovich says. “It’s a new Microsoft.”

THe actual quote as far as I can determine: "You never know, it's definitely possible. Crazy stuff happens."

No OSS was harmed in the making of this post.

Comment Been playing this for decades... (Score 1) 186 186

I never get tired of this game, and I still go through month long stretches of time where wheneve rI have spare time, I start playing it.

Lately I've discovered nethack 4 - it's an unofficially blessed fork of nethack and some fo the same core developers are contributing to it. The game mechanics and strategies are the same, but the user interface (still all character based by default) is a lot nicer. It also is a complete architectural change to a client-server model - and one fo the benefits of that is that save files have gotten a lot more robust & streamlined.

   

Comment Re:The unclassified network? (Score 1) 98 98

I'd say breaking into the whitehouse network is a bit more worrisome than breaking into the whitehouse website. The website is indeed a poster. The network (even unclassified) is still terribly worrisome. You think all secrets we don't want other governments to know are classified?

Comment Re:Obvious (Score 1) 51 51

That's pretty much the definition of what science is. I'm not even clear what they think the alternative might be that would still qualify as science.

Well, there's lost, and then there's LOST. I can get a little in lost my own city for a few moments, then drive around, see a familiar landmark and get my bearings rather quickly. But getting totally lost in somewhere that's completely unexplorered is a very different experience.

The author is talking about the latter experience. Getting a little more concrete, he's talking about going off somewhere where science hasn't mapped any landmarks. The frontier of science is very different from the parts we're more familiar with. When you're in familiar territory people nod and agree with you, and you aren't saying much that's controversial. The frontier is a wild and crazy place where radical new ideas are born (and most of the time horribly wrong, like in his cautionary tales).

The best example I can think of someone that's that's a bit lost in "the woods" happens is physicist Lawrence Kraus and his Universe from nothing, who at times skirts the edge between science and philosophy. Another would be m-theory, and brain-theory, which propose alternate universes. Clearly something really out there and strange and unfamiliar.

You're right, that science is always about the unknown. The author is talking about the comfort level people have with the field they're in. For contrast, an example of in-town, back of your hand science would be something like confirming another aspect of relatviity. Very important work, but still largely familiar.

Comment Re:888 bytes is a pretty fair amount. (Score 1) 142 142

With the exception of the SS#, most of that data is publicly available on the internet for most people. If you know someones name, it's very easy to find someones phone#, address, birth date, relatives, former addresses, etc.

We don't live in as private a world as you're assuming.

Comment Re:No Worries (Score 2) 73 73

Yup, just like adding up all the blood Americans lose to papercuts ever year. Assume 1 drop of blood is lost per papercut, or .06 ml. A highly conservative guess is 1/1000 americans get papercuts in a year. (300,000,000/1000)*.06=18 liters of blood. So obviously it wouldn't hurt you if you suddenly lost 18 liters of blood, since that amount is lost in minor little papercuts every year.

Scale matters, and concentrating a huge amount of oil, (or in the above example blood loss) makes a big difference.

Comment Re:Why is he worried (Score 1) 583 583


He obviously must see and be directly involved in some aspects of AI that are causing him to be concerned.

You're assuming a rational person. The fact that he used the metaphor of freaking demons, pentagrams, and holy water is evidence that's not true. Obviously he doesn't think they're actual demons, but you can see where his mind is when he brings up the horror genre. That doesn't smack of people programming cars to making life/death decisions.

Comment Re:Wow (Score 1) 283 283

Umm.. OK.

Lest you forget, Microsoft was ruled both a monopoly in 2000, and ruled they miss-used their monopoly power. They were going to be split into multiple companies until the 2000 election changed the political landscape and the Federal government dropped the suit.

What makes you think Microsoft STILL doesn't hold monopoly power over the PC business? They don't hold as much of a stranglehold anymore, but I'd say it's still very much a monopoly.

"You're a creature of the night, Michael. Wait'll Mom hears about this." -- from the movie "The Lost Boys"

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