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Comment Re:Cheap you say? (Score 1) 153

My machine came with 16GB. A year ago one of the 4GB DIMMs died on me. I pulled it out and chucked it. I was planning on replacing it, but never got around to it.

I occasionally look at my memory usage. with 12GB ram and a 5GB swap, I almost never use more than 4GB of the ram and 3% of swap space.

tl;dr : Memory might be cheap, but we need less than we think we do.

Comment Re:We have to redefine "malicious" (Score 0) 57

"Claiming to âoeprotect your phone from malware and theftâ, this malicious app runs in the background of victimsâ(TM) devices once downloaded and collects their data and location."

If I was that crapware maker, I would feel quite comfortable marketing my app as a "Windows 10 security doubler". After all, if Windows 10 logs your data and sends it to a site on the internet, it must be doubly secure to send the data to a second site.

Comment Ask the state! (Score 4, Funny) 115

It needs to have an iPad app that is simple enough for a three-year-old to use with help and for a five-year-old to use without help;

Ask the state to help. After all, if you're leaving a three year old with a five year old, the state will get involved at some point soon.

Or, if I misinterpreted and there's some sort of adult supervision, have the adult press the damn icon on your iPad.

Comment Re:Yawn (Score 1) 105

I don't see it, either.

But I know several guys who want to get rid of their wallets. So they get phone cases which have an extra compartment. They keep their driver's license, a credit card, and a $20 bill in the compartment and everything else is digital.

It's interesting and none of them mention being hacked (yet). But I certainly don't have enough trust in a phone manufacturer to do this.

Comment Re:Poor example (Score 1) 451

This is complicated by the fact that some human drivers do not even know themselves, what they intend to do. So how should a computer control system be able to anticipate what a human driver intends to do, when the human drivers don't even know themselves?

This is Google we're talking about. If anyone can do it, it's them.

First thought: use facial recognition against their Google Street View database to positively identify the individual. Then pull up all their online activities and generate a psychological profile of how aggressive a driver they are. Then compare that profile to others in the past as well as that individual in the past to predict what they are going to do next.

Comment Re:Business and Bitcoin? What could go wrong? (Score 1) 68

I have some US dollars. Let's say $100,000.

If I wanted to hold that much in Bitcoins, what is the recommended way? Not in a central bank, because I need to control my wallet.

But on my computer? How do I prove that a virus in a flash add on a website doesn't break in and start reading local data looking for a bitcoin wallet?

Offline, burnt on a CD/DVD? Do I need to worry about bitrot? How do I prevent that?

Comment Re:I'd choose billing. (Score 2) 311

The problem of billing is multi-factorial.

1 - The hospital has to spread out the cost of the device, upkeep, and personnel over all patients that use the device.
2 - The hospital negotiates a payment with insurance companies. This has to be lower or the same as for uninsured patients. If the hospital low-balls what they charge uninsured patients, all insurance companies will get the lower rate.
3 - The hospital negotiates with the insurance companies every year or so. If they don't come up with an agreement, the hospital becomes "out of network" and a higher percentage of the bill goes to the patient.

This leads to hospitals charging 3-5x for uninsured patients what they charge to insurance companies. As a patient, you can call up the hospital billing and see if the charge can be lowered or waived. They are surprisingly negotiable at times.

This is the theory that Jack built. This is the flaw that lay in the theory that Jack built. This is the palpable verbal haze that hid the flaw that lay in...