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Comment: Re:I seem to remember... (Score 1) 272

by MMC Monster (#47746277) Attached to: Dropbox Caught Between Warring Giants Amazon and Google

- Automatic full resolution photo uploading from mobile
- Sync that just works

These are the reasons I use DropBox for my family. It's great to have it installed on their smart phones and not have to worry about them losing their phone photos. (That's about the only thing of value not synced to an otherwise easy-to-get-to-cloud.)

Now if they could only offer reasonable pricing alternatives. How about $5/month for every doubling over whatever amount you have in free?

Comment: Re:As a non-fanboy I like the Cook Apple better. (Score 1) 89

by MMC Monster (#47744075) Attached to: 3 Years In, a "B" For Tim Cook's Performance at Apple

Drop the artificial restrictions on OS updates "when it was manufactured" isn't a good yard-stick for install eligibility and everyone knows it. Those Mac Pros that are six months too old to run Mavericks are more than capable of doing so and everyone knows it, it just makes you look like a bunch of pricks by barring install.

I don't know about MBPros too old to run Mavericks. I do have a MacBook that runs Mavericks. In fact, I have one of the (very) short run of Aluminum MacBooks that was created in late 2008. Pretty much the oldest MacBooks that runs Mavericks. And the OS is slow as all heck. The system limps by, but I really need to get new hardware to make much use of it.

I can't imagine a hardware version older than that that's capable but Apple won't allow. Likely more pain than it's worth unless you're running only text-mode or headless apps.

Comment: Re:Not this again. (Score 1) 637

by MMC Monster (#47616911) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: "Real" Computer Scientists vs. Modern Curriculum?

No, undergraduate CS is to allow students to learn the algorithms and mathematics behind them. Languages should be an afterthought at that level. It's all big O notation and knowing which algorithm to pick.

Or at least that's what it was when I did undergrad CS 20 years ago. Now get off my lawn!

Comment: Re:Yes! Copyright terrorism must be stopped! (Score 2) 207

You seriously want to put this to jail time?

Two million people jailed a year for downloading Expendables 3? Who's going to man these jails? Who's going to pay for them.

Let's be fucking realistic please. Make it 10 times the retail cost of the copyright infringed item plus court costs and call it a day. But the person sueing has to prove that you're the one that infringed copyright. Not just a blind IP address.

Comment: Re:this is great news! (Score 2) 94

by MMC Monster (#47516423) Attached to: Open-Source Blu-Ray Library Now Supports BD-J Java

I stream from my basement. Buy the discs (or, more recently, rent them from Redbox or borrow them from the library) and rip them. A NAS in the basement holds everything, and xbmc on computers in the livingroom and bedroom for the streaming.

Total cost $1000. Being able to stream whatever movie I own within 15 seconds of turning the TV on? Priceless.

Best part? The NAS accepts ssh connections from outside the home. I have a similar setup in a friend's house and my parents, both of which do a 'rsync over ssh' every time they turn the system on (with logs stored on my NAS so I know the syncs are occurring). Now I get distributed remote mirrors and they get streaming from their basements.

Comment: Re:Reasons why I don't like the Internet of Things (Score 3, Insightful) 63

by MMC Monster (#47387553) Attached to: Hacking Internet Connected Light Bulbs

#1 - You're not that interesting.

#2 - Connected devices can have interesting power management solutions. It's not just adjusting the home temperature when it figures out no one's going to be home for 8 hours. What about adjusting when the fridge uses the most power during times when electricity is the cheapest? Or sending you a text message if the motion detectors go off but your car is not in the driveway/garage? Or have lights go on just after dusk (regardless of time of year) and go out at a random time between 10 and 11pm (unless motion suggests people are home)?

The upfront cost of these devices are a bit more. To be absorbed by early adopters, of course. But when the prices come down and the kinks straightened out, they can be quite useful.

OnTopic: My neighbor showed me the app he had on his phone to monitor his pool. It allowed him to monitor temperature, pH, turn the filter and heater on, etc. The installer gave it a default 4 digit passcode, which was apparently the same four digit passcode that every other installation had. Since the ID number of the pool was adjustable, my neighbor joked that he would sometimes log into random people's pools and flash their pool lights (and had others do it to him as well). Fortunately no one's raised the pool temperature to 90 degrees or something like that (yet).

Comment: Re:Not subtle at all (Score 4, Interesting) 289

It's a scam and they're liars. It's really as clear and un-subtle as that. When they deliver a review unit, the expectation is that it will be representative of the products that end users will by buying.

More and more I only believe Consumer Reports. They don't accept donated items for review. They purchase their own from a normal middleman to make sure what they get is what a normal person would get.

That being said, it's remarkable they're still in business.

You can not win the game, and you are not allowed to stop playing. -- The Third Law Of Thermodynamics

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