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Submission + - EOMA-PCMCIA modular computer aiming for $15 and Fr ( 3

lkcl writes: "An initiative by a CIC company Rhombus Tech aims to provide Software (Libre) Developers with a PCMCIA-sized modular computer that could end up in mass-volume products. The Reference Design mass-volume pricing guide from the SoC manufacturer, for a device with similar capability to the raspberrypi, is around $15: 40% less than the $25 rbpi but for a device with an ARM Cortex A8 CPU 3x times faster than the 700mhz ARM11 used in the rbpi. GPL Kernel source code is available. A page for community ideas for motherboard designs has also been created. The overall goal is to bring more mass-volume products to market which Software (Libre) Developers have actually been involved in, reversing the trend of endemic GPL violations surrounding ARM-based mass-produced hardware. The Preorder pledge registration is now open (account creation required)."

Submission + - Ammonia to fuel cars for just 27 cents per liter ( 3

LuxuryYacht writes: John Fleming of SilverEagles Energy and Tim Maxwell from Texas Tech University, say they have developed a way to make ammonia that is cheap enough so that it could be used as fuel for cars. The Texas Tech effort seems either based or improved from an electrolyzer Fleming devised for potential use in gas fireplaces. The Fleming designed NH3 processor offers huge cost savings in the production of hydrogen using electricity. The processor is suggested to cost $200 US and is predicted to produce fuel for about 27 a liter, about $1.00 a gallon.

Submission + - Single molecule is tiniest electric motor ever (

An anonymous reader writes: For the first time, an electric motor has been made from a single molecule. At 1 nanometre long, it's the smallest electric motor ever. Its creators plan to submit their design to Guinness World Records, but the teeny motor could have practical applications, such as pushing fluid through narrow pipes in "lab-on-a-chip" devices. E. Charles Sykes at Tufts University in Boston and colleagues anchored lopsided butyl methyl sulphide to a copper surface and flowed current through it.

Submission + - SFPD: We Stood Outside When Apple's Investigators (

An anonymous reader writes: The mysterious case of the second lost iPhone prototype has taken another disturbing twist. San Francisco police have admitted that "three or four" of their officers stood outside a man's house as up to two Apple investigators searched the home...

Submission + - Color Changing Polymer Microspheres

LuxuryYacht writes: A research team led by a chemist at the University of California, Riverside has fabricated microscopic polymer beads that change color instantly and reversibly when external magnetic fields acting upon the microspheres change orientation.

The beads or "magnetochromatic microspheres" have excellent structural stability. They also are highly compatible with various types of dispersion media such as water, alcohol, hexane and even polymer solutions, allowing them to retain magnetically tunable colors in a variety of chemical environments.

Applications of the new material include display type units such as rewritable or reusable signage, posters, papers and labels, and other magnetically activated security features. The new material also can be used to make environmentally friendly pigments for paints and cosmetics, as well as ink materials for color printing. Video of rotating microspheres

Neckties strangle clear thinking. -- Lin Yutang