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Comment: Re:Google Filter Bubble (Score 1) 205

by Lusa (#40627087) Attached to: UK ISP Asks Religious Groups To Set Parental Controls

That should be, they have home customers needing this? This is almost pointless news, claranet moved away from being a home customer broadband provider years ago. I was a customer for many years and the tech guys were awesome. They would know what you were asking them and I rarely had any problems. The business changed their focus towards business customers and drove a lot of existing customers away with their policies. Just look at their homepage and find the consumer broadband. Even then on the page for home consumers it is talking about business customers.

Comment: Re:Advice (Score 1) 643

by Lusa (#38614800) Attached to: What a Black Box Data Dump Looks Like

I may just be incredibly cynical but I believe this is so joe public is more likely to return the vehicle to the dealer for any and all work. Making it difficult or near impossible to switch out bulbs for example. On my car some people suggest removing the front bumper! The manual isn't too bad though. What bothers me more is the fact the cd/radio manual was thicker than the car one.

Comment: Re:classification (Score 1) 551

by Lusa (#38563856) Attached to: In New Zealand, a System To Watch for Disabled Parking Violators

Can't say for elsewhere but in the UK the permit for parking is assigned to the person not the car so the spots can be used if anyone in the car needs it. However we do have a problem (no idea how large) of friends/family members taking the permit and using it without actually needing it. Spot checks will fail to spot a misused permit. It gets worse because trips with a permit holder may be one way, for example picking up someone from an appointment at the doctors. It's not always feasible to leave them on the pavement whilst a car is fetched. People disabled by choice should have restrictions placed on their use, like mandatory treatment (gym!) or they lose the permit.

Comment: Re:There's no need for that complexity. (Score 1) 551

by Lusa (#38563650) Attached to: In New Zealand, a System To Watch for Disabled Parking Violators

Possibly because disabled spots are regulated with certificates where parent and child are a convenience and are far easier to abuse. All you need is a child seat and any spot check is worthless. I've seen a disturbing number of invisible children here. Mind you, I've also seen parent and 16 year old child using such spots too :(

Comment: Re:The actual damages... (Score 0) 647

by Lusa (#38551712) Attached to: Actual Damages For 1 Download = Cost of a 1 License

Downloading something without paying for a license is taking the same thing you take if you climb a tree and watch a local school football game from outside the fence instead of buying a ticket.

Stop nitpicking on the meaning of a word. Assuming the software is used then a downloaded copy is depriving the vendor of money. Think of it another way then, what if everyone did it? What would happen? Would the software vendor continue to make software? Would they even bother in the first place since the compensation has been removed? Depriving the vendor of money will deprive people of much needed jobs. Like that football game, if everyone watched it from outside would they keep having the games? I'm not from the USA so I don't know what they use the money for but I bet it's not pure profit. Yeah, nothing is taken my arse.

Comment: Re:i wonder (Score 1) 266

by Lusa (#37977690) Attached to: Linux Mint 12 to Blend GNOMEs 2 & 3

The main problem with the Debian edition as it stands is it's a rolling release. Taking updates can be *very* hit or miss as to whether you have a working desktop afterwords. Still, I regularly use two machines with it installed and generally I'm happy. I use one as an experiment to determine if I should update the other :)

Comment: Re:Potential privacy nightmare (Score 1) 249

by Lusa (#37552356) Attached to: Amazon's New Silk Redefines Browser Tech

I'm somewhat confused. Why would they care? You're talking about a small percentage of web browser usage compared with all other browsers and platforms. Not only that but this is just a small percentage of the network traffic. What about instant messages, bittorrent and other formats of communication some of which will be completely bespoke?

No, I call bullshit. Some conspiracy theorists will happily sling around that an agency has their claws on the data but when you realise it is such a small percentage of all the data out there. It's pointless. Besides, they could get more information by hooking into the little facebook Like buttons, google's +1 or other tracking technology already in use. The real winners are the data miners, now amazon has a way to increase this without having to buy so much from other sources.

Comment: Re:Ex news of the world journalists ..... (Score 1) 237

by Lusa (#37458738) Attached to: British Govt Debates Swapping Printers For iPads

My thoughts too, this is not off topic. Like any other computer given to an individual they will be filled with junk very quickly, oh and perhaps some business content. I'm assuming they aren't factoring in the cost of writing secure software so all that tracking information that the device sends back and who knows what from the apps will be very useful to someone. Better yet, how long before one of these is left in a taxi, on a train? Unlike paper these will slowly fill up with all manner of information that is likely not meant to be released.

Comment: Re:LOL, "really inflammatory, inaccurate" messages (Score 1) 369

by Lusa (#37063522) Attached to: UK Police Arrest 12 Over Facebook Use Inciting Riots

I really dislike this sort of opinion. Do you really believe all available police officers are scouring facebook and twitter rather than say a few officers who for various reasons are unfit to participate in riot control but are helping to prevent them spreading. Yes I want police on the streets cracking skulls but that doesn't mean that they stop dealing with all the normal day to day problems either. This is the same as saying you have a bomb when on a plane or in an airport. It's a crime regardless of how stupid the person saying it is or how they say it.

Comment: Re:Do we need this? (Score 1) 354

by Lusa (#35388272) Attached to: Debian Is the Most Important Linux

    The most important due to the number of ISO downloads?

The most important due to the sheer size of the ISO downloads.. stable is 8 dvds or 52 cds? ;)

I have no idea what is on most of those (nor likely care) but I like that someone does care enough to be the package maintainer. I'm sure other distributions also can say the same so I'm not saying Debian is best for that. I'm not even saying it's best, different distro's for different tastes and needs. I personally dislike the sheer number of distributions though. It's almost becoming a fashion statement and what is in this season. I predict a retro comeback in 2012, console only with blingy gold border decorations :D

Comment: Re:Its Winter. (Score 1) 549

by Lusa (#35052382) Attached to: Sensor Measures In Fingertips If Driver Is Drunk

I'm not trying to be funny but I am curious, what rights are you referring to that would be violated by having a test to determine if you are fit to drive a vehicle. Most places consider driving a privilege, not a right. If you abuse that privilege, by drinking, doing drugs, driving stupidly, causing death etc then you lose it. At that point what right do you have to allow you to drive?

I'd rather just believe that it's done by little elves running around.

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