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Comment: Re:Sadly, I don't see an "out" for AMD (Score 1) 125

by hairyfeet (#49505815) Attached to: AMD Withdraws From High-Density Server Business

Show me a hardware site where over 80% (Tom's over 90%, Anand over 95%) of their advert budget isn't paid for by Intel? You could have all you wanted. the bias is so bad on tom's now that for their "best gaming" CPU lineup the writer admitted that most new games require at least a quad core to run and then scored the Pentium dual and i3 (which even Intel fans make fun of) higher than an FX6 that was cheaper!

But since your lousy net connection can't run video (and you obviously missed TFL) I'll be happy to provide a source that nobody would accuse of bias provided by another in this thread..here you go, enjoy. And wadda ya know, when compiled with GCC instead of ICC or MCC (they call it "Wintel" for a reason guys) the exact same chips that sites like Tom's were saying get "curbstomped" by an i3 or low end i5 are trading blows with the i7....is it magic? Is the coders of GCC just soooo fucking good that they can squeeze an extra 40% performance out of an AMD chip with only a compiler? Nope its what happens when you take market rigging out of the equation.

Again I don't give a fuck if you are a raging Intel fanboi, this ought to PISS YOU OFF as market rigging ONLY benefits the company doing the rigging, it leads to higher prices, less competition, and worse selection. If the market rigging were removed from the equation Intel's scores would go down, people would see a 5-10% difference costing 200%+ in cost and not buy Intel, then Intel would have to lower their prices to make their chips a better value for the consumer...a win for the market, a win for the consumer, and a win for YOU as your new Intel chip would be much cheaper than what you are paying now.

Or are you such an Intel fanboy you consider it a tithe to pay more than a market fair price for your processors?

Comment: Re:Photo realistic? (Score 2) 79

I would say even the scorpion king looked better than rubber neo vs plastic smith clones in Matrix II, that wasn't even cartoon, it looked like something off of robot chicken lol.

As for the trailer? Everybody just has to face reality and reality is 1.- The 2 new "next gen" consoles are AMD netbook APUs with GPUs that would run around $130-$150 USD, the fanboys can scream and gnash their teeth but anybody that looks at the AMD whitepapers on the jaguar arch will see its not even on the level of the Athlon wrt most functions, much less an FX or i5/i7, 2.- The Steam hardware survey gives those designing on the PC side a good idea where the "sweet spot" to get the most customers will be and last I checked that is GPUs in the $100-$150 range and quad core CPUs, and 3.- With current technology the only way you would even get close to that is a pair of XFire or SLI'd top o' the line cards and even then I doubt you'd even hit 30 fps.

So unless they come up with a way to make technology such as ray tracing and the rendering of tens of millions to hundreds of millions of polygons a LOT cheaper? Yeah you aren't gonna see anything like that, I don't care if your PC cost more than a new car. It certainly isn't gonna even be in the same ballpark with a PS4 or XB1 which is the platform that will be the primary focus of the devs, no way in hell.

Comment: Re: "Surge Pricing" (Score 1) 42

by swillden (#49505663) Attached to: How Uber Surge Pricing Really Works

If I own a store and there's a civil emergency, I won't even open my store. I would use the products for the safety/survival of my family.

On the other hand if there aren't any silly laws in place preventing your from selling your goods at 10X the normal price, maybe you will only keep aside what your family really needs and sell the rest, thus making important goods available to the public when they're really needed. But if that's illegal, yeah, might as well keep them for yourself. When things get back to normal you can continue selling whatever you didn't use at the normal price -- same as you were able to sell it for during the emergency, but without taking the risk of selling something you might need.

Restrictions on scarcity pricing are a bad idea and serve only to create even more scarcity.

Comment: Re:Copyrighting History (Score 1) 220

by swillden (#49504945) Attached to: Joseph Goebbels' Estate Sues Publisher Over Diary Excerpt Royalties

It seems that the bigger problem here is that modern copyright is so unreasonably long, historical documents are still under copyright. Anything over the original 28 year copyright term is really robbing the next generation of history.

While I know al copyright issues are sensitive on /. and hate going against the stream here, note that the next generation is not really robbed from history. They just have to pay for it.

Assuming the copyright owner can be found, and is willing to sell.

The basis for Eldred v Ashcroft was that the celluloid of many old films is rapidly degrading but because the copyright ownership is muddled it's impossible to find anyone from which the right to republish the films can be purchased, so the films are being lost forever.

Comment: Re:Ok.... Here's the thing, though ..... (Score 5, Insightful) 182

by swillden (#49504883) Attached to: Utilities Battle Homeowners Over Solar Power

The power companies are all moving towards "smart meter" technologies anyway. Why not make sure they've put one in that can monitor the output of a PV solar (or even a wind turbine) installation while they're at it?

For that matter, it seems perfectly reasonable to require the homeowner to install such a meter as part of a solar installation, as a condition of being able to sell power to the utility -- or even to push power into the grid at all.

Comment: Look at previous disasters (Score 2, Insightful) 228

Just look at previous desasters and see who was saved by having a cellphone with FM and who dies because they did not have FM on their cellphones.

You should also take into account who dies becase of FM and who lived because they did NOT have when no disaster was going on.

And how often do emergencies happen? In all my life I have NEVER been in a situation where my life depended om having an FM radio.
And those people who are worried about some major collaps (people who burried themselves in 2000, you can come out now.) will have HAM radio licences and what not.

Comment: Re:About half (Score 2) 223

by ultranova (#49503647) Attached to: Norway Will Switch Off FM Radio In 2017

Meh. Didn't we hear the same argument when color TV was introduced? Or CDs, Digital TV, Digital cameras, Fly by wire, the Internet etc etc every other technology implementation ever?

Cassettes and analog cameras weren't banned. They simply fell out of favor because CDs and digital cameras were way superior as far as the end user was concerned. By contrast, digital tv and digital radio don't benefit the end user, they'll simply let parts of the spectrum be auctioned off; so they require legislation to force the end users to pay the costs for the transition so someone else can profit.

Comment: Re:Scientific American begs to differ (Score 1) 318

by ultranova (#49503611) Attached to: Can High Intelligence Be a Burden Rather Than a Boon?

What is 'general intelligence'? (Anything like Colonel Panic?)

Self-metaprogramming, basically. You are smart if you can repurpose existing neural circuits to handle new problems (because that way your consciousness is freed to consider things like consequences, and specialized circuit is of course faster than general-purpose one), you learn fast if you can build such circuits fast, and you are insightful if you can examine your own mental subroutines and how they work - if you actually learn to reprogram them consciously you'll likely find a new religion or something.

It does not follow that being able to understand calculus gives you peace, happiness and longevity.

70 years is equivalent to 411,222,120,000,000 miles. It might not actually be longer, but it sure sounds bigger :).

Comment: Re:Read "Outliers" (Score 1) 318

by ultranova (#49503573) Attached to: Can High Intelligence Be a Burden Rather Than a Boon?

It's not a debate that I mean to stir up 3-deep in a Slashdot thread, but just to say that the vast majority of people at most places on the political spectrum agree: Those that have the ability to succeed, should have the opportunity to. It's just the mechanics they disagree on that are sometimes, sadly, mutually exclusive.

The disagreement is about what happens to those who won't succeed, to Joe Average and Joe Hobo. Currently, Joe Average's position is getting worse and worse, which is a huge problem because modern economy can't actually work without them having money to act as consumers. And as the economy stalls and enters a tailspin, Joe Succesful shifts the blame to Joe Hobo, closing his eyes from the approaching ground because doing something about it would require taking a break from his personal interests to visit the cockpit, and getting Joe Average to get along with it because pretending bad things only happen to deserving people is a pleasant fantasy.

Of course such situations are always rectified eventually, the only question remains whether it's by recycling the wreckage.

"You must have an IQ of at least half a million." -- Popeye

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