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Comment: Re:People Are Such Babies (Score 1) 203

by Luckyo (#48685683) Attached to: Facebook Apologizes For 'Year In Review' Photos

It's usually best to avoid smugly correcting others when you're clueless on the subject. In adversary justice system like that in US, the scenario #2 will usually warrant a long look from prosecutor to see if the case is worth bringing to court. Most cases of such nature will usually be either settled as is the case in US or straight up dropped with a slap on the wrist like a fine like happens in most of Europe with no going to court unless you contest prosecutor's decision.

In investigatory system like in France, you'll have magistrate look into the case, decide that there is likely no merit and that there is probably merit against the police and let you off with a slap on the wrist.

Comment: Re:Many DDR3 modules? (Score 1) 138

by Luckyo (#48685641) Attached to: Many DDR3 Modules Vulnerable To Bit Rot By a Simple Program

Took me a while to figure out what you're talking about. That's some exotic trolling. Well done. Shame no one cares about it this far down the chain.

Your case was specifically addressed long ago when I mentioned the costs. You've linked to standards table which addresses what kinds of memory are made. It's correct to state that in those standard, CAS latency generally gets net better as frequency goes up. What you are trolling on is costs - subject mentioned at the very beginning.

Comment: Re:People Are Such Babies (Score 2) 203

by Luckyo (#48683775) Attached to: Facebook Apologizes For 'Year In Review' Photos

What on earth are you talking about?

I was talking about specific problem - resisting arrest as a way to protest police action. It's stupid in both potential cases:

1. You're guilty. You just add resisting arrest to the case, making it worse for you in the court.
2. You're innocent. You could have walked, but now you're going to get criminal record for resisting arrest.

You lose in both cases.

Comment: Re:don't fucking post it! (Score 4, Insightful) 203

by Luckyo (#48683303) Attached to: Facebook Apologizes For 'Year In Review' Photos

Let's see.

User's daughter is alive. He takes pictures of her and posts them on facebook like a proud parent.

User's daughter dies. User grieves.

User starts to get over his grief. Facebook tosses the images right in his face.

Reaction of a third party: "well you shouldn't have posted them in the first place!"

Tell me AC. Are you this sociopathic in life outside slashdot too? Because if you are, you should seek psychiatric help.

Comment: Re:Many DDR3 modules? (Score 1) 138

by Luckyo (#48683171) Attached to: Many DDR3 Modules Vulnerable To Bit Rot By a Simple Program

Where did I post anything to suggest what you're suggesting?

It's well known that increasing RAM frequency impacts latency in net negative way. Your suggestion implies that impact is neutral, when it's rarely so unless you buy much more expensive RAM specifically picked and binned for those frequencies and latencies. Typical RAM sold incurs significant net negative impact on latency as frequency increases. Alternative is lower reliability.

Anyone who did any overclocking and worked with RAM memory doing it should be well aware of this issue.

Comment: Re:Many DDR3 modules? (Score 1) 138

by Luckyo (#48674363) Attached to: Many DDR3 Modules Vulnerable To Bit Rot By a Simple Program

Actually that is how it works. Concept of a bottleneck refers to aspect of a pipe+pool system where thickness of the pipe is the limiting factor and increasing width of the pipe offers a comparable increase in flow throughput.

When you double pipe's thickness and get 1-2% more flow, it means that your system's bottleneck is elsewhere.

Comment: Re:duh (Score 1) 361

by Luckyo (#48672581) Attached to: Study: Police Body-Cams Reduce Unacceptable Use of Force

Let me see if I understood your argument correctly. You are genuinely, seriously making an argument that physical assault on a police officer is something that typically starts as a physical assault, with no preamble of any kind? Preamble like mouthing off, threatening, arguing and so on?

Because if you ever even glanced at criminology studies on the topic, you'd know that overwhelming majority of violence against police in modern Western countries, including US (which is a massive outlier in this group to start with, but is similar in this regard) starts with much lesser problem and escalates into a violence. OP clearly shows that camera present deters the beginning of escalation very effectively and provides correlation to match it in that both ends of the abuse are down in the test case.

Comment: Re:duh (Score 1) 361

by Luckyo (#48670915) Attached to: Study: Police Body-Cams Reduce Unacceptable Use of Force

Correct. That is why places like taxis, shopping malls and so on have "this place is being video taped" notices. It's a very well researched and understood deterrent to most forms of anti-social behaviour.

I suspect that police officers' cameras are/will be made to be easily visible for that very reason.

Comment: Re:Many DDR3 modules? (Score 1) 138

by Luckyo (#48670899) Attached to: Many DDR3 Modules Vulnerable To Bit Rot By a Simple Program

This used to be the problem back in the day before DDR3, true. After DD3 got to around 1333-1600MHz, the problem was effectively eliminated in favour of latency being the only reasonable bottleneck. And that actually gets worse rather than better when you increase the frequency

The tests you link show exactly that - no noticeable difference. They're looking at 1-2% difference between 1333 modules and 2400 modules. Because that is not the bottleneck. System is bottlenecked elsewhere, most likely on GPU. If this was a bottleneck, you would see improvements that would match the differential in RAM speed, as happens with most GPU tests for example.

Comment: Re:Many DDR3 modules? (Score 1) 138

by Luckyo (#48670877) Attached to: Many DDR3 Modules Vulnerable To Bit Rot By a Simple Program

That is indeed the problem with many technologies. "If they were standard, their costs would be much cheaper".

At which point the question becomes that of "is this functionality actually needed as a standard in most use scenarios?"

For ECC memory, this question was asked ever since the early 80s and the answer is still "no".

"It's when they say 2 + 2 = 5 that I begin to argue." -- Eric Pepke

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