Follow Slashdot stories on Twitter


Forgot your password?
Back for a limited time - Get 15% off sitewide on Slashdot Deals with coupon code "BLACKFRIDAY" (some exclusions apply)". ×

Submission + - Samsung Galaxy S3 Face Unlock tricked by photograph (

AlistairCharlton writes: Android's Face Unlock security on the Samsung Galaxy S3 can be tricked into unlocking the phone by showing it a photograph of the owner.

In a test carried out by IBTimes UK, we found that the Galaxy S3 cannot distinguish between a photograph and a real person, leading us to suggest users should select a more secure way of locking the phone, such as with a PIN or password.


Submission + - Samsung's super-sized Galaxy Note changed my life (

thetechblock writes: "I can’t tell you how many times I’ve looked at my puny iPhone 4 with disgust, wishing with all my might that it were bigger. It’s too portable, too pint-sized, and those qualities have no place in a society that values 6,000-lb SUVs and 2,000-calorie meals over hatchbacks and sensible portions. I’m tired of misplacing a dainty device that was designed with the average hand in mind, and I’m sick of having a smartphone that’s not interested in being anything else."
The Internet

Submission + - Patent Troll Claims Ownership of Interactive Web (

wiedzmin writes: A low-profile Chicago biologist, Michael Doyle, and his company Eola Technologies, who has once won a $521m patent lawsuit against Microsoft, claim that it was actually he and two co-inventors who invented, and patented, the “interactive web” before anyone else, back in 1993. Doyle argues that a program he created to allow doctors to view embryos over the early Internet, was the first program that allowed users to interact with images inside of a web browser window. He is therefore seeking royalties for the use of just about every modern interactive Internet technology, like watching videos or suggesting instant search results. Dozens of lawyers, representing the world’s biggest internet companies, including Yahoo, Amazon, Google and YouTube are acting as defendants in the case, which has even seen Tim Berners-Lee testify on Tuesday.

The hardest part of climbing the ladder of success is getting through the crowd at the bottom.